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I have been searching the Internet and my hard-drive trying to see if Python3 has an equivalent to BASH's ~/.bashrc file. The reason I need one is so I can have certain functions be defined as soon as I open Guake which I configured to use Python3.

For example, with such a file, I can add this function

def CLEAR(): os.system(['clear','cls'][os.name == 'nt'])

to such a file. Then, when I open Guake, I can use Python and type CLEAR() when I want to clear the terminal. Otherwise, I need to make the function every time I use it the first time in a Guake session and I am very lazy on some days (^u^).

So, the question is what goes in this blank:

BASH is to ~/.bashrc or /etc/bashrc as Python3 is to __

sh - ~/.bashrc = Python3 - ? def CLEAR(): os.system(['clear','cls'][os.name == 'nt'])

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1  
Do you want CLEAR function is defined for Python interactive session? –  falsetru Aug 19 '13 at 13:15
    
@falsetru, yes I want CLEAR() to be defined in the interactive session. I also have other functions and variables that I want pre-set in the interactive session. –  Devyn Collier Johnson Aug 19 '13 at 13:20
    
No up-votes? I thought this was a very clever question. Does it need improvements? –  Devyn Collier Johnson Aug 19 '13 at 13:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Make a file (for example ~/.pythonstartup)

import os

def CLEAR():
    os.system(['clear', 'cls'][os.name == 'nt')

Set the environmental variable PYTHONSTARTUP to reference above file. Put that into ~/.bashrc

export PYTHONSTARTUP=$HOME/.pythonstartup

See The Interactive Startup File in Python tutorial

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Python is more flexible, you want to set the $PYTHONSTARTUP variable to the pathname of your start up file

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