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I am novice in regex. Like to know the below date pattern.

(\\d{2}(0[1-9]|1[012]|[0]{2}))

I just know,

  • 0[1-9] is 01 or 12 or.... 19
  • 1[012] is 10 or 11 or 12
  • [0]{2} is 0000 ?
  • \\d{2} is ?
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0[1-9] is not 01 or 12 or 19, it is either 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08 or 09. You really should read about regex, head on to regular expressions info. – Ibrahim R. Najjar Aug 19 '13 at 13:33
    
@Sniffer Notice the "...". – arshajii Aug 19 '13 at 13:34
1  
@arshajii I noticed it but nevertheless 0[1-9] is never a 12. – Ibrahim R. Najjar Aug 19 '13 at 13:38
    
@Sniffer Oh, I misread that myself. – arshajii Aug 19 '13 at 13:38
    
@ arshajii / Sniffer - sorry for the typo and thanks for the info. – RedGuts Aug 19 '13 at 13:41

\d is a predefined character class that is generally equivalent to [0-9] (sometimes it also includes unicode digits, depending on the regex engine). Moreover, {n} is a quantifier, and X{n} matches X exactly n times. Therefore, \d{2} matches 2 consecutive digits.

Also, [0]{2} is 2 consecutive 0s: 00 (not 0000).

You're also slightly off about 0[1-9]: it matches any of 01, 02, ..., 09 (1 can't be at the start). You're correct about 1[012].

Overall, this is what your regex looks like:

Regular expression visualization

If you want to read more about them, a great online reference regarding regular expressions is regular-expressions.info.


Note that in the above answer I've assumed you mean \d by \\d, and have used the latter because you're representing the regex in a string format that requires \s to be escaped. When representing generic regexes, however, it's best to leave \s unescaped. In other words, \\d might be interpreted as a literal backslash followed by a d, so \\d{4} would match \dddd. Presumably this isn't what you mean;

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Awesome Tool :) +1 for that ^^ – dognose Aug 19 '13 at 14:37

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