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This is slightly different to finding all the positions of a substring inside a string because I want it to work with words which may be followed by a space, comma, semi-colon, colon, fullstop, exclamation mark and other punctuation.

I have the following function to find all the positions of a substring:

function strallpos($haystack,$needle,$offset = 0){ 
    $result = array(); 
    for($i = $offset; $i<strlen($haystack); $i++){ 
        $pos = strpos($haystack,$needle,$i); 
        if($pos !== FALSE){ 
            $offset =  $pos; 
            if($offset >= $i){ 
                $i = $offset; 
                $result[] = $offset; 
            } 
        } 
    } 
    return $result; 
}

Problem is, if I try to find all positions of the substring "us", it will return positions of the occurrence in "prospectus" or "inclusive" etc..

Is there any way to prevent this? Possibly using regular expressions?

Thanks. Stefan

share|improve this question
    
Try this php.net/manual/de/function.preg-match-all.php –  Jurik Aug 19 '13 at 13:52
    
It doesn't return the positions of the found matches. –  Stefan Dunn Aug 19 '13 at 13:55
    
str_word_count() with a format argument of 2; followed by an array_filter() on the word you want to check would be an alternative to regexp –  Mark Baker Aug 19 '13 at 13:58
    
@StefanDunn, so you say your $needle should be something like "' ' . $needle . ' '" - no need to say that a pregmatch in combination with strpos would be better, thought. –  Jurik Aug 19 '13 at 14:02
    
It would probably be easier to just do what you were planning do with the positions, rather than trying to find those positions. For example, if you were planning to insert a tag there, just replace $needle with <tag>$needle</tag>. That could be easily done with regex. Of course, I don't know what you're trying to do, but it's worth mentioning. –  ironcito Aug 19 '13 at 14:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Just to demonstrate a non regexp alternative

$string = "It behooves us all to offer the prospectus for our inclusive syllabus";
$filterword = 'us';

$filtered = array_filter(
    str_word_count($string,2),
    function($word) use($filterword) {
        return $word == $filterword;
    }
);
var_dump($filtered);

where the keys of $filtered are the offset position

If you want case-insensitive, replace

return $word == $filterword;

with

return strtolower($word) == strtolower($filterword);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much. That worked a charm. –  Stefan Dunn Aug 19 '13 at 14:37

You can capture offset with preg_match_all:

$str = "Problem is, if I try to find all positions of the substring us, it will return positions of the occurrence in prospectus or inclusive us us";
preg_match_all('/\bus\b/', $str, $m, PREG_OFFSET_CAPTURE);
print_r($m);

output:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => Array
                (
                    [0] => us
                    [1] => 60
                )
            [1] => Array
                (
                    [0] => us
                    [1] => 134
                )
            [2] => Array
                (
                    [0] => us
                    [1] => 137
                )
        )
)
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