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I recently came across the following piece of code to display 2 decimal digits.

val = ((int)(val*100.0))/100.0

The result was as told, but I don't get the logic behind the functioning of it. Can anyone please explain. Thank you.

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closed as off-topic by Mark, Antti Haapala, Sergio, MikO, Soner Gönül Aug 20 '13 at 12:45

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions concerning problems with code you've written must describe the specific problem — and include valid code to reproduce it — in the question itself. See SSCCE.org for guidance." – Mark, Antti Haapala, Sergio, MikO, Soner Gönül
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1  
Is this the exact code? I'd expect a cast to integral type between the multiplication and division. –  Angew Aug 19 '13 at 14:22
1  
Are you sure it wasn't more like val = round(val*100)/100? The code you've posted will leave the value (more or less) unchanged, unless it overflows. –  Mike Seymour Aug 19 '13 at 14:22
    
You are using float constants everywhere, so I don't see how this would accomplish anything. –  OldProgrammer Aug 19 '13 at 14:23
    
This isn't rounding anything. And unless a non-float conversion is in the original code, it is hardly doing anything. If there is such a conversion, both answers below accurately describe what is happening (but is isn't rounding). –  WhozCraig Aug 19 '13 at 14:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If the actual code looked something like this:

float val = 3.141592654;
val = ((int)(val * 100.0)) / 100.0; // result would be 3.14

Then the logic behind it is that the cast to an integer truncates the decimal. So multiplying by 10^n (where n is the number of digits you want in the decimal) and then casting it would move the decimal to the right n places, and then drop the remaining decimal. Then, you cast it back to a float and divide by 10^n to get the desired result.

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I think you are missing some essential details of the code - i do not think this code displayed by you would do anything, especially not rounding. Seems like this code is attempting to just truncate everything after the second digit.

Assuming it is a float datatype, the following is what you are looking for (for truncating). I splitted it up for (more) simplicity:

float val = 42.1234;
int helpVal = val *100;       //produces 4212, the rest will simply be cut off
float roundedVal = helpVal/100.0;  //produces 42.12

To make it shorter you could also go with:

float val = 42.1234;
float roundedVal = ((int) (val*100))/100.0;
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1  
For the OP's info, this will truncate, not round, to the last two digits. Try it with 42.9876, which should round to 42.99. The description is accurate. nice (+1) –  WhozCraig Aug 19 '13 at 14:35
    
Well, my fault. Was responding to the question text (which says nothing about rounding) but somehow managed to ignore the title... –  The13thToast Aug 19 '13 at 14:40
    
Your answer is accurate (and in fact your comment "...will simply be cut off..." is correct). That was for the OP's benefit, not yours. I up-voted your answer. (poor choice of variable names, heh, but the description of the algorithm is good). –  WhozCraig Aug 19 '13 at 14:42

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