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Lets say I have a MultiIndex Series s:

>>> s
     values
a b
1 2  0.1 
3 6  0.3
4 4  0.7

and I want to apply a function which uses the index of the row:

def f(x):
   # conditions or computations using the indexes
   if x.index[0] and ...: 
   other = sum(x.index) + ...
   return something

How can I do s.apply(f) for such a function? What is the recommended way to make this kind of operations? I expect to obtain a new Series with the values resulting from this function applied on each row and the same MultiIndex.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I don't believe apply has access to the index; it treats each row as a numpy object, not a Series, as you can see:

In [27]: s.apply(lambda x: type(x))
Out[27]: 
a  b
1  2    <type 'numpy.float64'>
3  6    <type 'numpy.float64'>
4  4    <type 'numpy.float64'>

To get around this limitation, promote the indexes to columns, apply your function, and recreate a Series with the original index.

Series(s.reset_index().apply(f, axis=1).values, index=s.index)

Other approaches might use s.get_level_values, which often gets a little ugly in my opinion, or s.iterrows(), which is likely to be slower -- perhaps depending on exactly what f does.

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Also worth noting that vectorising f, and using & | etc., may also be faster. –  Andy Hayden Aug 19 '13 at 14:54
    
Currently I use the reset_index approach, will hold a little to see if someone proposes a cleaner solution. –  elyase Aug 19 '13 at 14:54
2  
+1 For getting rid of the MultiIndex. While these are occasionally useful, more and more I find myself turning my indices into columns. –  Phillip Cloud Aug 19 '13 at 15:50

Make it a frame, return scalars if you want (so the result is a series)

Setup

In [11]: s = Series([1,2,3],dtype='float64',index=['a','b','c'])

In [12]: s
Out[12]: 
a    1
b    2
c    3
dtype: float64

Printing function

In [13]: def f(x):
    print type(x), x
    return x
   ....: 

In [14]: pd.DataFrame(s).apply(f)
<class 'pandas.core.series.Series'> a    1
b    2
c    3
Name: 0, dtype: float64
<class 'pandas.core.series.Series'> a    1
b    2
c    3
Name: 0, dtype: float64
Out[14]: 
   0
a  1
b  2
c  3

Since you can return anything here, just return the scalars (access the index via the name attribute)

In [15]: pd.DataFrame(s).apply(lambda x: 5 if x.name == 'a' else x[0] ,1)
Out[15]: 
a    5
b    2
c    3
dtype: float64
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You may find it faster to use where rather than apply here:

In [11]: s = pd.Series([1., 2., 3.], index=['a' ,'b', 'c'])

In [12]: s.where(s.index != 'a', 5)
Out[12]: 
a    5
b    2
c    3
dtype: float64

Also you can use numpy-style logic/functions to any of the parts:

In [13]: (2 * s + 1).where((s.index == 'b') | (s.index == 'c'), -s)
Out[13]: 
a   -1
b    5
c    7
dtype: float64

In [14]: (2 * s + 1).where(s.index != 'a', -s)
Out[14]: 
a   -1
b    5
c    7
dtype: float64

I recommend testing for speed (as efficiency against apply will depend on the function). Although, I find that applys are more readable...

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1  
Hm. Now I wonder if there should be a Series.eval/query method...I'll bring this up over at pandas. –  Phillip Cloud Aug 19 '13 at 15:54
    
@PhillipCloud, +1, I need to use indices a lot(add/subs, aligns and missing data) and this would be great to have. –  elyase Aug 19 '13 at 16:38
    
I'm finding increasingly more often that if I convert my MultiIndexes to columns I'm much happier and life is easier. There's so much more you can do with columns in a DataFrame than a Series with a MultiIndex, in fact they are essentially the same thing, except queries will be faster in the DataFrame columns than in the Series-with-MultiIndex. –  Phillip Cloud Aug 19 '13 at 16:50
    
@PhillipCloud I'm the same, they should really be first class citizens (rather than the opposite). –  Andy Hayden Aug 19 '13 at 17:13

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