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My application has a requirement for users to log into different accounts in separate tabs in their browser (we target Chrome specifically). Because Rails uses cookies to store session info, when the user is logged in, they are logged in on all tabs in the browser. I'm using the ActiveRecord session store method, but even the ID for the session is saved as a cookie.

It seems there's a solution in using HTML5's sessionStorage mechanism, which is limited in scope to the tab or window that the user is logged into. It seems all I have to do is direct Rails to save the session info into the sessionStorage rather than cookies. But I can find no information on this at all.

Assuming there's no way to configure the session store to do this in Rails, is it possible to override the ActiveRecord session saving mechanism? Any pointers on where to look for info about how to go about this?

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Did you find an answer to this question? –  Marklar May 15 at 0:32

1 Answer 1

You now configure the Cookie-based session store through an initializer, probably in config/initializers/session_store.rb. In Rails 3 the session store is a piece of middleware, and the configuration options are passed in with a single call to config.session_store:

Your::Application.config.session_store :cookie_store, :key => '_session'

You can put any extra options you want in the hash with :key, e.g.

Your::Application.config.session_store :cookie_store, {
  :key =>           '_session_id',
  :path =>          '/',
  :domain =>        nil,
  :expire_after =>  nil,
  :secure =>        false,
  :httponly =>      true,
  :cookie_only =>   true
}
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I am configuring the session store here and using the ActiveRecord session store. How would I manage this to save in the HTML5 sessionStorage instead of a cookie though? –  Aaron Vegh Aug 20 '13 at 15:15

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