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I am trying to model a domain as records and discriminated unions, i.e. immutable. I noticed, that I have a m:n relationship, say authors and books. And now I'm looking for a good way of expressing it, such that:

  • ideally immutable
  • changing a property on a book is easy, that is, if I want to create a copy, I don't have to iterate over all the authors
  • access is straightforward; ideally somehow an author has a books list

So far, i didn't find any solution fulfilling all of the criteria. What I found was:

  • Each author has a list of books (I don't really need the opposite direction). This allow for easy access and is immutable, however changing a property on a book entails changing every autor
  • Hold an immutable list of ref cells of books and each author has an immutable list of ref cells. This makes changing a property easy and access is easy, however this is not actually immutable, since the ref cell is not immutable.
  • Hold an immutable list of books and each author has an immutable list of IDs. This is immutable and makes changes to the books easy, however the access is more difficult because you need to do a lookup and you might have a non-existing ID.

Are there any solutions that fulfil all of the above, maybe something like an immutable ref cell? And if so, what do they look like.

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It seems straightforward if you make the change-able properties on Book mutable. Any reason not to? –  Daniel Aug 19 '13 at 16:30
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Note that if you have an immutable list of authors and map over it, you do not actually end up copying all authors. The authors who do not change will just be pointing to the same instance (so the overhead of immutable solution is not that big). –  Tomas Petricek Aug 19 '13 at 19:27
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I'm not afraid of run-time overhead, actually, I was more like wondering, how one can make something like aliasing in a functional manner. So far, I think just making it mutable would be simplest. The point being like this: Say you wrote 3 books, each book as you as author and now you change your address. Do I now have to actually change your address in every book? If you were mutable, by changing your address, I implicitly update all books. But how can you achieve the same in a functional manner? –  Daniel Fabian Aug 19 '13 at 19:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As I mentioned in the comments, if you have an immutable list of authors and map over it, you do not actually end up copying all the authors. The authors who do not change will just be pointing to the same instance (so the overhead of immutable solution is not that big).

However, it is true that if you have multiple books with the same author, there is no aliasing and so the authors will all be separate values (and you will have to map over all books).

I think a reasonable representation in this case would be to keep the authors and books separate and link them via a key (such as author name - in the example below - or some other ID):

type Author = { Name : string; Address : string }
type Book = { Title : string; Author : string }

// For efficient lookup, create a hashtable with authors 
let authors = dict [ "Tomas", { Name = "Tomas"; Address = "Cambridge" } ]
// Books are stored simply as a list
let books = [ { Title = "Real World FP"; Author = "Tomas" } ]

// To get nice access, add AuthorDetails property to the Author record
type Book with 
  member x.AuthorDetails = authors.[x.Author]

for book in books do 
  printfn "%s (%s, %s)" book.Title book.Author book.AuthorDetails.Address

This does not let you mutate the collection authors. If you were writing this in a purely functional way, you would probably have some recursive function that keeps current authors as argument and so you would not need mutation (just build a new dictionary).

But I think it is reasonable to have a ref value holding the dictionary, or even keep a mutable dictionary (but I would do that only if you do not have concurrency; in fact, in presence of concurrency, Map might be safer choice).

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thx for the idea of augmenting the book. In our case, we really only want to edit the details in the GUI, so no concurrency is involved at all. –  Daniel Fabian Aug 19 '13 at 20:55

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