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What is the correct pattern, when coding with promises, to access data coming from long before in a chain of promises?

For example:

do_A.then(do_B).then(do_C).then(do_D).then(do_E_WithTheDataComingFrom_A_And_C_OnlyWhen_D_IsSuccesfullyCompleted)

My current solution: passing along a single JSON structure through the chain, and let each step populate it. Any opinion about that?

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I forgot to mention that steps B, C and D all require the data from the step before in order to run properly. Sorry if that point was not clearly stated. –  lOlive Aug 19 '13 at 16:39
    
What you are doing sounds about right. That's exactly what I would do. The only thing I would offer is a correction to the question, "... passing along a single javascript object through the chain ...". The object may have started out its (client-side) life as JSON but (in all likelihood) has been json-decoded. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Aug 20 '13 at 22:23

1 Answer 1

Yes, this is the correct way to chain state with actions.

Chaining .then statements is very common and is usually our building block when piping things around. It's at the very core of promises.

What you're doing is both correct and idiomatic.


For the curious spirit let's show this.

In order to verify this - we can check the promises specification.

We want to verify that:

  1. It chains
  2. In the case of a rejection, it doesn't call the handler in the chained then
  3. It rejects the next promise returned from then with the same reason
  4. It executes in sequence passing return value.

Let's verify these in order, using the specification - in particular .then:

1. It chains

7.1 then must return a promise [3.3].

Great, let's verify that it also chains on fullfillment

If either onFulfilled or onRejected returns a value x, run the Promise Resolution Procedure >[[Resolve]](promise2, x).

Great, so we know that when our promise resolves or rejects then our then handler is called with the appropriate parameter. So .then(do_A).then(do_B) will always work assuming do_A resolves.

2. In the case of a rejection, it doesn't call the handler in the chained then

7.iv. If onRejected is not a function and promise1 is rejected, promise2 must be rejected with the same reason.

Great, so it rejects and calls onRejected if it's there, if it doesn't it chains.

3. It rejects the next promise returned from then with the same reason

We just covered that in 2.

4. It executes in sequence passing return value.

That is again

If either onFulfilled or onRejected returns a value x, run the Promise Resolution Procedure [[Resolve]](promise2, x).

So, if you set onFulfilled it'll run the resolution process. The resolution process itself dictates:

The promise resolution procedure is an abstract operation taking as input a promise and a value, which we denote as [[Resolve]](promise, x). If x is a thenable, it attempts to make promise adopt the state of x, under the assumption that x behaves at least somewhat like a promise. Otherwise, it fulfills promise with the value x.

If/when resolvePromise is called with a value y, run [[Resolve]](promise, y).

Where y is the return value of x.

Great! so it works.

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