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I have been experimenting with C++11 again recently, after some absence, and after reading many articles on the internet I am now thoroughly confused about what is the most efficient way to return large objects from factory functions (basically, data analysis from a database).

I have become a fan of unique_ptr, but I read in several articles that because of the new move-constructors it is now perfectly possible to return a big vector say by value and because of these new semantics it should be as fast as copying one pointer.

To try this out, I wrote a small test program with outputs in the various constructors:

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

using namespace std;


class C {
public:
    C( string n ) : _name{n} { cout << "Constructing a C named '" << _name << "'\n"; };

    C() : _name( "EMPTY" ) { cout << "Default-constructing a C named '" << _name << "'\n"; } ;     // default-ctor

    C( const C& c ) : _name{c._name} {
        _name += " [copied]";
        cout << "Copy-constructing a C named '" << _name << "'\n";
    };

    C( C&& c )
        : _name{c._name} {
        _name += " [moved]";
        cout << "Move-constructing a C named '" << _name << "'\n";
    };

    ~C() { cout << "Destructing a C named '" << _name << "'\n"; };

    string getName() { return _name; };

private:
    string _name;
};

and tested with

C fooVal() {    
    cout << "In fooVal\n";
    string str = "value return";
    C c(str);
    return c;
}

C& fooRef() {
    cout << "In fooRef\n";
    string str = "reference return";
    C* pC = new C( str );
    return *pC;
}

C* fooPtr() {
    cout << "In fooPtr\n";
    string str = "classical pointer return";
    C* pC = new C( str );
    return pC;
}

unique_ptr<C> fooUPtr() {
    cout << "In fooUPtr\n";
    string str = "unique_ptr return";
    return unique_ptr<C>(new C(str));
}

shared_ptr<C> fooSPtr() {
    cout << "In fooSPtr\n";
    string str = "shared_ptr return";
    return shared_ptr<C>(new C(str));
}

// IMPORTANT: THIS NEEDS TO BE COMPILED WITH FLAG -fno-elide-constructors
int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    C cv(fooVal());        
    cout << "cv constructed\n";    
    C& cr = fooRef();        
    cout << "cr constructed\n";        
    C* pC = fooPtr();        
    cout << "*pC constructed\n";        
    unique_ptr<C> upC = fooUPtr();        
    cout << "*upC constructed\n";        
    shared_ptr<C> spC = fooSPtr();        
    cout << "*spC constructed\n";        
    cout << "Alive: " << cv.getName() << ", " << cr.getName() << ", " << pC->getName() << ", " << upC->getName() << ".\n";
}

Now, if I just compile this as-is, the compiler optimizes away ("elides") various constructor calls and I get the output:

In fooVal
Constructing a C named 'value return'
cv constructed
In fooRef
Constructing a C named 'reference return'
cr constructed
In fooPtr
Constructing a C named 'classical pointer return'
*pC constructed
In fooUPtr
Constructing a C named 'unique_ptr return'
*upC constructed
In fooSPtr
Constructing a C named 'shared_ptr return'
*spC constructed
Alive: value return, reference return, classical pointer return, unique_ptr return.
Destructing a C named 'shared_ptr return'
Destructing a C named 'unique_ptr return'
Destructing a C named 'value return'

OK, but you can see how much copying has been optimized away. To see what is the "specified" behaviour, I compiled this with the flag -fno-elide-constructors (I'm using Apple LLVM version 4.2 (clang-425.0.28)). But then I get the following output:

In fooVal
Constructing a C named 'value return'
Destructing a C named 'value return'
Move-constructing a C named ' [moved]'
Destructing a C named ''
cv constructed
In fooRef
Constructing a C named 'reference return'
cr constructed
In fooPtr
Constructing a C named 'classical pointer return'
*pC constructed
In fooUPtr
Constructing a C named 'unique_ptr return'
*upC constructed
In fooSPtr
Constructing a C named 'shared_ptr return'
*spC constructed
Alive:  [moved], reference return, classical pointer return, unique_ptr return.
Destructing a C named 'shared_ptr return'
Destructing a C named 'unique_ptr return'
Destructing a C named ' [moved]'

So, clearly, something fishy is going on with the value-returned object. Obviously, this is more than just a small problem, because I would have expected -fno-elide-constructors not to change semantics, only the amount of constructors involved.

Thus I ask:

  1. What is going on? Why does the value object "lose" its string parameter? And where?
  2. It looks like value returns have problems whereas the other ones work just fine. So why are people recommending nowadays that we return by value and "the system takes care of the rest"?
  3. What is a good way to return large objects?
  4. Am I making a mistake somewhere that I am not seeing?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
I think the standard library will only optimize some cases depending on noexcept status of the special members. Just a random thought, really –  sehe Aug 19 '13 at 16:59
2  
GCC doesn't do this, it's possible (A) you made an error you didn't tell us, or (B) you found a compiler bug. Since B is unlikely and A is likely... –  Mooing Duck Aug 19 '13 at 17:04
    
I am not sure but if you are compiling your foo* functions without -fno-elide-constructors and main with that flag this may be causing you problems. Have you tried to compile everything with the same options? –  Tomek Aug 19 '13 at 17:06
3  
"To see what is the "specified" behaviour, I compiled this with the flag -fno-elide-constructors"- er, copy elision is specified in the Standard. Constructor eliding is part of the specification. –  Puppy Aug 19 '13 at 17:50
1  
Just return things by value. It's not that big a deal. Until you have actual timing measurements, you don't have a performance problem. –  GManNickG Aug 19 '13 at 18:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks like it's this clang bug: http://llvm.org/bugs/show_bug.cgi?id=12208 which while simplified is string concatenation related and apparently still not fixed.

share|improve this answer
1  
The comments imply that it happens with all unnamed temporaries that have destructors that are returned by value. –  Mooing Duck Aug 19 '13 at 18:26
    
I think something else is going on. See how the 'value return' object is destroyed before being moved! That is clearly not right. This looks like I cannot return anything by value with -fno-elide-constructors. –  oxfordatnight Aug 20 '13 at 13:11

To be honest, I don't think -fno-elide-constructors results in a valid program.

As it will immediately crash on my system, and valgrind was quick to point out major errors:

==6098== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==6098== Copyright (C) 2002-2011, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==6098== Using Valgrind-3.7.0 and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==6098== Command: ./test
==6098== 
In fooVal
Constructing a C named 'value return'
Destructing a C named 'value return'
==6098== Use of uninitialised value of size 8
==6098==    at 0x4EEF83B: std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::basic_string(std::string const&) (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6.0.17)
==6098==    by 0x40297C: C::C(C&&) (test.cpp:19)
==6098==    by 0x401C0C: C::C(C&&) (test.cpp:22)
==6098==    by 0x40165D: main (test.cpp:69)
==6098== 
==6098== Conditional jump or move depends on uninitialised value(s)
==6098==    at 0x4EEF84D: std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::basic_string(std::string const&) (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6.0.17)
==6098==    by 0x40297C: C::C(C&&) (test.cpp:19)
==6098==    by 0x401C0C: C::C(C&&) (test.cpp:22)
==6098==    by 0x40165D: main (test.cpp:69)

This is using

Ubuntu clang version 3.2-9 (tags/RELEASE_32/final) (based on LLVM 3.2)
Target: x86_64-pc-linux-gnu
Thread model: posix

This might be a compiler bug, or it might be a case of "Read The Documentation" regarding -fno-elide-constructors. I haven't checked.

share|improve this answer
4  
It should result in a valid program, I'd call this a compiler bug! –  Mooing Duck Aug 19 '13 at 17:06
1  
@MooingDuck well, compiler switches are by their very definition implementation defined, right. It could have been an alias for -fanything-goes - I haven't checked the docs :) –  sehe Aug 19 '13 at 19:36
    
That's a very interesting point! Honestly, since the _name string is empty (which according to the program it should never be!) - I expected this to crash. I would say that the fact that it doesn't crash on my clang/Mac system is probably just "luck". –  oxfordatnight Aug 19 '13 at 20:51

This is how I'd write fooVal:

C fooVal() 
{    
    cout << "In fooVal\n";
    return C("value return");
}

.. and this is how I'd write C::C(C&&) - although it should be generated automatically in this case...

C( C&& c ) : _name{std::move(c._name)} //  note the "std::move"
{
    _name += " [moved]";
    cout << "Move-constructing a C named '" << _name << "'\n";
};
share|improve this answer

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