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I have a command that I'm executing using OPEN with pipe, and I want to set a timeout of 10 seconds and have the sub process aborted if the execution time exceeds this. However, my code just causes the program to hang- Why is my ALARM not getting delivered properly?

my $pid = 0;
my $cmd = "someCommand";
print "Running Command # $num";
eval {
    local $SIG{ALRM} = sub {                    
        print "alarm \n";
        kill 9, $pid;
    };              
    alarm 10;
    pid = open(my $fh, "$cmd|");
    alarm 0;
};
if($@) {
    die unless $@ eq "alarm \n";
} else {
    print $_ while(<$fh>);
}

EDIT:

So From the answers below, This is what I have:

my $pid = open(my $fh, qq(perl -e 'alarm 10; exec \@ARGV; die "exec: $!\n" ' $cmd |));
print $_ while(<$fh>);

But this print ALARM CLOCK to the console when the alarm times out...whereas I dont specify this anywhere in the code...how can I get rid of this, and where would I put the custom alarm event handler?

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I want to set a timeout of 10seconds and have the sub process aborted if the execution time exceeds this

A different approach is to set the alarm on the subprocess itself, with a handy scripting language you already have:

my $cmd = "someCommand";
my $pid = open(my $child_stdout, '-|',
   'perl', '-e', 'alarm 10; exec @ARGV; die "exec: $!"', $cmd);
...

Your child process will initially be perl (well, the shell and then perl), which will set an alarm on itself and then exec (replace itself with) $someCommand. Pending alarms, however, are inherited across exec()s.

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Thanks for that. Is there anything I can do to reset the alarm for each exec? How would I handle the case that the alarm is raised? As in, where would I put the handling code? –  Madhumitha Harishankar Aug 19 '13 at 17:54
    
Thanks, @ikegami. I resisted that because I suspect "someCommand" might actually be "someCommand --with=blank-separated args". –  pilcrow Aug 19 '13 at 18:58
    
@user6561, the alarm is reset for each exec(). It's unique to each spawned process. Regarding error handling, you'd notice signal death in $? after the spawned process terminates. On my system that's $? & 127 == 14 (14 is SIGALRM). See the docs for system for more detail. –  pilcrow Aug 19 '13 at 19:01
    
ok I understand, thanks a lot! 2 more questions: 1. On Perldoc, it says that exec does not return..so in this case, how are we able to put an alarm above exec and wait for it? and 2. When the alarm timesout, does the exec-ed process die? –  Madhumitha Harishankar Aug 19 '13 at 19:11
    
@user6561, your perl script will spawn a child. That child is initially a new perl process. This second perl process sets an alarm on itself. It then replaces its process image (exec()) with that of your "someCommand". This new process image is a different program, but retains some attributes of the now-gone second perl process: PID, parent (that is, we're still a child of your top perl script), process group, session, permissions (usually), pending kernel alarms, and more. –  pilcrow Aug 19 '13 at 19:20

All your code is doing is setting a 10 second timeout on the open call, not on the whole external program. You want to bring the rest of your interaction with the external command into the eval block:

eval {
    local $SIG{ALRM} = sub {                    
        print "alarm \n";
        kill 9, $pid;
    };              
    alarm 10;
    $pid = open(my $fh, "$cmd|");
    print while <$fh>;
    close $fh;
    alarm 0;
};
if($@) {
    die unless $@ eq "alarm \n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
This delivers the ALARM CLOCK signal, but kills the entire program at alarm signal...Might you know why that happens? –  Madhumitha Harishankar Aug 19 '13 at 19:17
    
Er, ..., no. Does it execute the die function in your if($@){...} block? What are the contents of $@? –  mob Aug 19 '13 at 19:30

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