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Convert the following hash to another hash.

{["2013-08-15", "123", "user1"]=>1, ["2013-08-15", "456", "user1"]=>1, ["2013-08-09", "789", "user1"]=>5} 

Convert the above hash to

{["2013-08-15", "user1"]=>2, ["2013-08-09", "user1"]=>1} 

As you can see the first and second key, value pairs in the hash have same date, different account, and same user, in this case i need to count the total number of user posts as two {["2013-08-15", "user1"]=>2}

in the last key, value pair, the count should be one because the user posted to only one account ("789") even though there are 5 posts {["2013-08-09", "user1"]=>1}.

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@mbratch Sure you can. IIRC any object can be be used as a hash key if it responds to hash and eql?. –  Abe Voelker Aug 19 '13 at 17:51
    
@mbratch Sure you can. {[1] => 'foo'}[[1]] returns foo. –  CodeGnome Aug 19 '13 at 17:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
h = {["2013-08-15", "123", "user1"]=>1, ["2013-08-15", "456", "user1"]=>1, ["2013-08-09", "789","user1"]=>5} 
Hash[h.group_by{|k,v| k[0]}.map{|_,v| [v.flatten.values_at(0,2),v.size]}]
# => {["2013-08-15", "user1"]=>2, ["2013-08-09", "user1"]=>1}

Or,

h = {["2013-08-15", "123", "user1"]=>1, ["2013-08-15", "456", "user1"]=>1, ["2013-08-09", "789","user1"]=>5} 
h.each_with_object(Hash.new(0)){|((d,_,u),_),hsh| hsh[[d,u]] +=1 }
# => {["2013-08-15", "user1"]=>2, ["2013-08-09", "user1"]=>1}
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It worked perfectly. –  Kumar Aug 19 '13 at 18:31

Using Facets' Enumerable#frequency you can write this clean and modular one-liner:

require 'facets'
hash1 = {["2013-08-15", "123", "user1"] => 1, ...}
hash2 = hash1.keys.map { |date, code, user| [date, user] }.frequency
#=> {["2013-08-15", "user1"] => 2, ["2013-08-09", "user1"] => 1}

Note that unpacking the values of the array makes easier to see what's going on. Also, note that you don't need to depend on Facets, just add Enumerable#frequency to your extensions library, it's a very common abstraction.

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I got this error hash1.keys.map { |date, code, user| [date, user] }.frequency NoMethodError: undefined method `frequency' for #<Array:0x007fdc2e813208> –  Kumar Aug 19 '13 at 18:20
1  
well, of course, you need to install facets: gem install facets. –  tokland Aug 19 '13 at 18:45

Not super elegant but works. Also, using arrays as hash keys is kinda weird.

h = {["2013-08-15", "123", "user1"]=>1, ["2013-08-15", "456", "user1"]=>1, ["2013-08-09", "789", "user1"]=>5}
h.inject(Hash.new(0)){|a,((date,post,user),v)| a[[date,user]] +=1; a } # => {["2013-08-15", "user1"]=>2, ["2013-08-09", "user1"]=>1}
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Thanks Abe. It worked. –  Kumar Aug 19 '13 at 18:31
  hash1 = {["2013-08-15", "123", "user1"]=>1, ["2013-08-15", "456", "user1"]=>1, ["2013-08-09", "789", "user1"]=>5} 

  hash2 = Hash.new
  hash1.each do |x,y|
      hash2[ [x[0],x[2]] ] = hash2[ [x[0],x[2]] ].to_i + 1
  end
  puts hash2

Note that you need to use the .to_i method for first-time initialization, else we'd be adding with nil, but this makes it 0.

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This can be done with group_by and map:

h = {["2013-08-15", "123", "user1"]=>1, ["2013-08-15", "456", "user1"]=>1, ["2013-08-09", "789", "user1"]=>5}

Hash[h.group_by { |(u, _, d), _| [u, d] }.map { |u, d| [u, d.size] }]
#=> {["2013-08-15", "user1"]=>2, ["2013-08-09", "user1"]=>1}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Note: as much as I like FP, where the use of _ to mean "whatever" is a common idiom, I prefer to give names to unused variables, it's more clear. In Ruby at least it looks weird. –  tokland Aug 20 '13 at 10:11

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