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I love the Unity and Ninject framework with dependency injection for C#.NET into the controllers with repository interfaces etc, but I am trying to think up an alternative in PHP and am struggling.

I have:

class User
{
    //..
}

interface IUserRepository
{
    public function Repository(); // This can't work as a variable, should I abstract?
}

class UserRepository implements IUserRepository
{
    public function Repository()
    {
        $users = // DAO gets users and returns them..
        // But how does the IUserRepository help me at all? Even if I had ninject or 
        // Unity creating some new link between the UserRepo and IUserRepo?
        return $users;
    }

    public function GetAllUsers()
    {
        // errr.. I'm confused
    }
}

// Something has to say if the AdminController is called, 
// inject into its construct, a new IUserRepository

class AdminController extends Controller
{
    private $repository;
    public function __Construct( $repository )
    {
        $this->repository = $repository;
    }

    public function ActionResult_ListUsers()
    {
        $users = $repository->GetAllUsers();
        // Do some clever View method thing with $users as the model
    }
}

The real question is PHP and repository approach. How does that work? You can see I'm blotching this a bit and really want to get it right!

EDIT::

Even more simple question. What is the benefit of the interface keyword? How does declaring an interface with some methods undefined and then making a new class that implements those methods to extend them, help when you cannot create a new interface like a class that then is filled in with the proper class that defines them?

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Kind of a broad question but I'll take a shot. Symfony 2 is a modern php framework built around an excellent dependency injection container. Symfony 2 supports Doctrine 2 which is a modern orm persistence layer in which repositories are supported.

Skim through here: http://symfony.com/doc/current/book/doctrine.html

Skip all the details on setting things up and instead look for:

Creating an Entity Class

Persisting Objects to the Database

Fetching Objects from the Database

The fetching section is where repositories come into play. This gives you a broad overview of one way to implement repositories on php. You might decide to research more on Symfony 2/Doctrine 2 or you may go another route entirely. But this will give you a starting point.

As far as interfaces go, I hate to say it but that is a real real real basic question. Might want to go through some OOP tutorials? A one or two sentence explanation is probably not going to make much sense.

====================================================

This may help a bit:

class User
{
    //..
}

interface IUserRepository
{
    public function getAllUsers();
}

class UserRepository extends DoctrineRepository implements IUserRepository
{
    public function getAllUsers()
    {
        return $this->findAll();
    }
}

class AdminController extends Controller
{
    private $repository;
    public function __Construct(IUserRepository $repository )
    {
        $this->repository = $repository;
    }
    public function ActionResult_ListUsers()
    {
        $users = $this->repository->getAllUsers();
        // Do some clever View method thing with $users as the model
    }

Your User and IUserRepository would reside in what is known as a domain layer.

The actual UserRepository implementation would be in a service layer. You might have multiple implementations. One talking to a sql database. Perhaps another talking to MongoDB or maybe just a file.

You controller lives in yet another layer. It expects to receive an object the implements an IUserRepository and thus has a getAllUsers method. Your controller does not care how the repository is actually implemented. All it knows is what is exposed via the interface.

It's up to your application to wire things up using dependency injection such that the controller gets the correct repository.

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So a repository may have GetUserById, GetAllUsers, GetUserByFirstName... and in the IRepository, you would also declare these functions right (like in C++ header files, you declare the structure first and then implement the actual codeblocks in the repository)? –  Jimmyt1988 Aug 19 '13 at 21:42
    
Yep. Fixed it. You will find that most Repository patterns use find instead of get. get tends to be used more on individual entity objects i.e. getters/setters. So for a repository you might have find,findAll,findBy etc. Your getAllUsers is somewhat redundant. You know that your dealing with a user repository so $userRepo->findAll() would naturally return all the users. –  Cerad Aug 19 '13 at 21:44
    
Yep again. Interfaces in one file. Implementations in another. In PHP you generally have one repository or class per file. Makes autoloading easy. –  Cerad Aug 19 '13 at 21:46
    
with the construct, have you written pseudo code there? I didn't know a type declaration could be made? or is this for interfaces only? that you can actually declare the type of the variable? –  Jimmyt1988 Aug 19 '13 at 21:50
1  
In php it's called type hinting. If you try to send in anything but an object that implements IUserInterface then a error will occur. Not mandatory but as you can imagine it can prevent many errors from slipping through. Consider reading: php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.php –  Cerad Aug 19 '13 at 21:53
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