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This question already has an answer here:

I have a class like this:

class Foo {
private:
    int a,b,c,d;
    char bar;
    double m,n
public:
    //constructors here
};

I wanna allow range-for loop on my class, e.g.

Foo foo {/*...*/};
for(auto& f : foo) {
  //f will be a specific order such as c,b,d,(int)m,(int)bar,a,(int)n
}

How can I achieve this? I was looking at iterator but don't know what are the requirements for a range-for loop. (Please don't ask me to use array or STL type)

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marked as duplicate by tuple_cat c++ Feb 15 at 19:48

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
You need an iterator type with begin() and end() exposure from your object class to enumerate the values in your (admittedly unusual) container. Perhaps an std::array<int,4> would better suit your needs. – WhozCraig Aug 19 '13 at 19:01
3  
You need a begin and end member function. – Rapptz Aug 19 '13 at 19:01
    
@Rapptz Is there any way to define how to iterate? begin and end in this case do not really apply... – texasbruce Aug 19 '13 at 19:04
    
@texasbruce Since you're opting for not using an array type it'll be difficult to. – Rapptz Aug 19 '13 at 19:08
    
@Rapptz I can use an array, but the data types are not the same in the class... Plus I need a specific order to iterate, not just from beginning to end. If I use an array, I might need to re-arrange the array and construct a temporary array and output, which will reduce the performance.. – texasbruce Aug 19 '13 at 19:10
up vote 9 down vote accepted

The loop is defined to be equivalent to:

for ( auto __begin = <begin-expr>,
           __end = <end-expr>;
      __begin != __end;
      ++__begin ) {
    auto& f = *__begin;
    // loop body
}

where <begin-expr> is foo.begin(), or begin(foo) if there isn't a suitable member function, and likewise for <end-expr>. (This is a simplification of the specification in C++11 6.5.4, for this particular case where the range is a lvalue of class type).

So you need to define an iterator type that supports pre-increment ++it, dereference *it and comparison i1 != i2; and either

  • give foo public member functions begin() and end(); or
  • define non-member functions begin(foo) and end(foo), in the same namespace as foo so that they can be found by argument-dependent lookup.
share|improve this answer
    
So an iterator type with begin(), end(), ++, * and != ? – texasbruce Aug 19 '13 at 19:13
    
@texasbruce: Yes. – Mike Seymour Aug 19 '13 at 19:16
    
Thanks.. lemme try it. Will post the final answer when it works – texasbruce Aug 19 '13 at 19:18
2  
@TemplateRex: It seems you're right. I'd assumed the lookup would include the global namespace, but I guess it means stictly ADL only. – Mike Seymour Aug 19 '13 at 19:29
1  
I wrote iterators coliru.stacked-crooked.com/… – Mooing Duck Aug 19 '13 at 19:29

This seems fairly un-C++-like, and rather prone to breakage. What if the iteration order is changed (accidentally or not) during some update in the future? Clients relying on a specific order will break.

All that said if you wish to support this all you have to do is implement your own iterator and provide begin/end methods (or free functions with those names) to provide access. Then the iterator takes care of remembering which attribute it's currently looking at and provides it when dereferenced.

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Here is a basic framework I came up with:

#include <iterator>

struct Foo;

template<typename Type>
struct MemberPtrBase {
    virtual ~MemberPtrBase() { }

    virtual Type get() const = 0;
    virtual MemberPtrBase & set(Type const &) = 0;
};

template<typename Class, typename RealType, typename CommonType>
struct MemberPtr : MemberPtrBase<CommonType> {
public:
    MemberPtr(Class * object, RealType(Class::*member))
    : m_object(object), m_ptr(member)
    { }

    CommonType get() const {
        return m_object->*m_ptr;
    }

    MemberPtr & set(CommonType const & val) {
        m_object->*m_ptr = val;
        return *this;
    }

    MemberPtr & operator=(RealType const & val) {
        return set(val);
    }

    operator CommonType() const {
        return get();
    }
private:
    Class * m_object;
    RealType (Class::*m_ptr);
};

template<typename Class, typename... Types>
struct MemberIterator {
public:
    using CommonType = typename std::common_type<Types...>::type;
public:
    MemberIterator(Class & obj, std::size_t idx, Types(Class::*...member))
    : m_object(obj), m_index(idx), m_members { new MemberPtr<Class, Types, CommonType>(&obj, member)... }
    { }

    MemberPtrBase<CommonType> & operator*() const {
        return *m_members[m_index];
    }

    bool operator==(MemberIterator const & it) const {
        return (&m_object == &it.m_object) && (m_index == it.m_index);
    }

    bool operator!=(MemberIterator const & it) const {
        return (&m_object != &it.m_object) || (m_index != it.m_index);
    }

    MemberIterator & operator++() {
        ++m_index;
        return *this;
    }
private:
    Class & m_object;
    std::size_t m_index;
    MemberPtrBase<CommonType> * m_members[sizeof...(Types)];
};

struct Foo {
public:
    using iterator = MemberIterator<Foo, int, int, int, int>;
public:
    Foo(int a, int b, int c, int d)
    : m_a(a), m_b(b), m_c(c), m_d(d)
    { }

    iterator begin() {
        return iterator(*this, 0, &Foo::m_b, &Foo::m_d, &Foo::m_c, &Foo::m_a);
    }

    iterator end() {
        return iterator(*this, 4, &Foo::m_b, &Foo::m_d, &Foo::m_c, &Foo::m_a);
    }
private:
    int m_a, m_b, m_c, m_d;
};

If you have a basic understanding of variadic templates, I think the code is self-explanatory.

Usage is simple:

#include <iostream>
int main(int argc, char ** argv) {
    Foo foo { 1, 2, 3, 4 };

    for(auto & mem : foo) {
        std::cout << mem.get() << std::endl;
        mem.set(3);
    }

    for(auto & mem : foo) {
        std::cout << mem.get() << std::endl;
    }
}

A POC can be found on ideone

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