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I'm wanting to drill down through a plist using uitableviews to get the a specific school. The drill down goes state->district->school. I've created a plist, but am not 100% sure that the structure is the best. Also, I can get the first set of information active on the first tableview, but am not sure how to proceed from there. Will I need to create a tableview for each drill down(stateview, districtview, schoolview) or can I reuse a generic tableview since they will simple be lists? Below is what I have so far. Thanks for your help.

PLIST
<plist version="1.0">
<array>
<dict>
    <key>districts</key>
    <dict>
        <key>District 1</key>
        <array>
            <string>School 2</string>
            <string>School 1</string>
        </array>
        <key>District 2</key>
        <array>
            <string>School 3</string>
            <string>School 4</string>
        </array>
    </dict>
    <key>state</key>
    <string>South Dakota</string>
</dict>
<dict>
    <key>districts</key>
    <array>
        <string>District 1</string>
        <string>District 2</string>
    </array>
    <key>state</key>
    <string>Arkansas</string>
</dict>
<dict>
    <key>districts</key>
    <array>
        <string>District 3</string>
        <string>District 4</string>
    </array>
    <key>state</key>
    <string>New York</string>
</dict>
</array>
</plist>

And here is my viewcontroller

#import "plistViewController.h"

@interface plistViewController ()

@end

@implementation plistViewController

- (id)initWithStyle:(UITableViewStyle)style
{
self = [super initWithStyle:style];
if (self) {

}
return self;
}

@synthesize content = _content;

-(NSArray *)content
{
if (!_content) {
    _content = [[NSArray alloc] initWithContentsOfFile:[[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"Data" ofType:@"plist"]];
}
return _content;
}

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
[super viewDidLoad];

}

- (void)didReceiveMemoryWarning
{
[super didReceiveMemoryWarning];

}

#pragma mark - Table view data source

- (NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView numberOfRowsInSection:(NSInteger)section
{

return [self.content count];
}

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"Cell";
UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier forIndexPath:indexPath];

cell.textLabel.text = [[self.content objectAtIndex:indexPath.row] valueForKey:@"state"];
return cell;
 }


#pragma mark - Table view delegate

- (void)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView didSelectRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
// Navigation logic may go here. Create and push another view controller.
}

@end
share|improve this question
    
I noticed that your class is missing its numberOfSections method. Is this indeed a copy and paste or did you just miss that? –  Justin Amberson Aug 19 '13 at 20:32
    
No, I haven't built that into the class. –  Tyrel Denison Aug 19 '13 at 20:43
    
The table won't know what to do if you don't add that method to the class. It's a required method. Other methods, like ones that can display a section header, or how tall to make the cells, are optional. –  Justin Amberson Aug 19 '13 at 20:45
    
Thanks for the heads up. I'll be sure to add that. –  Tyrel Denison Aug 19 '13 at 20:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The best thing about UITableView is that it doesn't care what data it displays. It just asks its delegate a few different questions:

  1. How many sections should I have?
  2. How many rows will be in each section?
  3. May I have a UITableViewCell for this _ Index Path?

So, you have to focus on making your delegate responses provide the correct data.

So, first split your plist up into manageable chunks. The UITableView prima-donna dataSource is an NSArray. Neatly maps to tableViews because of indexing logic.

That said, your first tableViewController plistViewController has good logic for displaying info. Specifically, you are querying the NSDictionary at array position x and asking for it to return its state object. 3 Dictionary objects, 3 strings returned. Nice.

So how do you go to the next level? Your tableView will help you here. It asks a specific question of its delegate:

  1. What do I do when user touches Section Y Row X?

You're going to need to set up another UITableViewController subclass called DistrictViewController. In the header .h file, you are going to need to make a strong property to an NSDictionary object. like so:

//DistrictViewController.h
@interface DistrictViewController : UITableViewController
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSDictionary *districtDictionary;
@end

//DistrictViewController.m
@implementation DistrictViewController
@synthesize districtDictionary;

And there we have it. This class is now set up to keep track of 1 NSDictionary object. Now you just have to configure your table delegate methods to show you the data you want.

The first example, what would be in the top Row (index:0) of the NSArray, you have a dictionary that has 2 keys: District 1 and District 2. But this is a problem. NSDictionary doesn't map to TableViews quite as easily, because NSDictionary objects don't use indexes to work. Don't fret. NSDictionary has a method called allKeys, which will give you an array of each key in the dictionary. This is useful for when you will be receiving an NSDictionary from somewhere but not know what keys it contains beforehand.

So, the questions your tableView asks, let's answer them:

//How many sections will be in me: Let's just say 1 for now.
//How many rows will be in this section:

//Ask the NSDictionary how many keys it has:
NSArray *keyArray = [self.districtDictionary allKeys];
return [keyArray count];

//Give me a tableCell for index path X,Y


//First, get your array of keys back:
NSArray *keyArray = [self.districtDictionary allKeys];
//Next, find the key for the given table index:
NSString *myKey = [keyArray objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];
//Finally, display this string in your cell:
cell.textLabel.text = myKey;

After this, you'd do the same thing for the final view. Set up a viewController for schools and call it SchoolViewController and make set it up to be in charge of an NSArray. Just like before:

@interface SchoolViewController : UITableViewController
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSArray *schoolArray;
@end

@implementation SchoolViewController
@synthesize schoolArray;

In this view, it will be a lot like the first. You just have this viewController answer the table's questions like before:

  1. How many sections? We need 1
  2. How many rows? We need as many as in the array return [schoolArray count];
  3. Give me a cell: cell.textLabel.text = [schoolArray objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];

The final piece that puts this all together is in the final question the table asks.

  1. What do I do when a user touches a row?

In each view, look at this method signature:

-(void)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView didSelectRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {

This is where you add your logic to hook things up. In the first view plistViewController, do this:

NSDictionary *topLevelDictionary = [self.content objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];
NSDictionary *allDistricts = [topLevelDictionary objectForKey:@"districts"];
DistrictViewController *dView = [[DistrictViewController alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewStylePlain];
dView.districtDictionary = allDistricts;
[self.navigationController pushViewController:dView animated:YES];

In the second view, DistrictViewController do this:

NSArray *keyArray = [self.districtDictionary allKeys];
NSString *myKey = [keyArray objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];
NSArray *schoolArray = [self.districtDictionary objectForKey:myKey];
SchoolViewController *sView = [[SchoolViewController alloc]initWithStyle:UITableViewStylePlain];
sView.schoolArray = schoolArray;
[self.navigationController pushViewController:sView animated:YES];

I hope this helps you. I typed this all in a plain text editor. Hopefully there's no misspellings. You'll need to #import the associated viewControllers in each one! Good luck.

share|improve this answer
    
I had to edit this. I saw after posting that the plist had a structure of NSArray->NSDictionary->NSDictionary. –  Justin Amberson Aug 19 '13 at 20:22
    
Thanks so much. There is plenty of information here to get me moving in the right direction again. Based on the information I am trying to navigate through, do you think my plist structure is the best suited, or do you recommend something else? If it is helpful to know, the end result is to pass an id associated with the school of choice, to an api that will return data about the school selected. –  Tyrel Denison Aug 19 '13 at 20:32
    
Hope this helps. Pro-tip: If it does help, you should upvote the answer with the little arrows. The checkmark is what marks the answer as "accepted". As far as your question, you may not always know what the data in any plist is going to contain. If you know up front, you can create views to address specific dictionary keys and such. But, more in line with the second view for districts, you don't know what the keys are going to be. If you can follow along and learn how to extract keys and objects dynamically, you'll be all set. –  Justin Amberson Aug 19 '13 at 20:56
    
Great. I'll crack into XCode in a few hours and see what color the smoke is now. Check marks will be showered upon you at that time. It always helps to have thorough explanations like yours rather than simply cut and paste code answers, though I have been saved by a good ole cut-n-pasted a few times ;) –  Tyrel Denison Aug 19 '13 at 21:56
    
The code looks fine and I have no errors or warnings, but I cannot get the transition to the districtViewController to take place. I set a breakpoint in the didSelect.. method and the information is being set (districtDictionary has the info). It is just not pushing the new table view. Any ideas? –  Tyrel Denison Aug 20 '13 at 18:22

To create drill down tables:

Boys and Girls example

you can do:

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
[super viewDidLoad];


NSArray *districts = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"district1", @"district2", @"district3", nil];
NSArray *states = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"NY", @"NJ", @"NO", @"StateOther1", @"StateOther2", nil];
NSArray *schools = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"", @"school1", @"school2", @"school3", @"school4", nil];

NSMutableDictionary *schoolSection = [NSMutableDictionary dictionary];
[schoolSection schools forKey:@"items"];
[schoolSection setObject:@"Shools" forKey:@"title"];

NSMutableDictionary *districtSection = [NSMutableDictionary dictionary];
[districtSection setObject:districts forKey:@"items"];
[districtSection setObject:@"Section" forKey:@"title"];

NSMutableDictionary *stateSection = [NSMutableDictionary dictionary];
[districtSection setObject:states forKey:@"items"];
[districtSection setObject:@"State" forKey:@"title"];

self.adresses = @[schoolSection, districtSection,stateSection];
}

Next:

- (NSInteger)numberOfSectionsInTableView:(UITableView *)tableView
{
return self.adresses.count;
}

- (NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView numberOfRowsInSection:(NSInteger)section
{
NSDictionary *currentSection = [self.adresses objectAtIndex:section];
if ([[currentSection objectForKey:@"isOpen"] boolValue]) {
    NSArray *items = [currentSection objectForKey:@"items"];
    return items.count;
}
return 0;
}

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"Cell";

UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
if (cell == nil) {
    cell = [[UITableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault
                                  reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
}

NSDictionary *currentSection = [self.adresses objectAtIndex:indexPath.section];
NSArray *items = [currentSection objectForKey:@"items"];
NSString *currentItem = [items objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];
cell.textLabel.text = currentItem;

return cell;
}

Next:

- (UIView *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView viewForHeaderInSection:(NSInteger)section
{
NSDictionary *currentSection = [self.adresses objectAtIndex:section];
NSString *sectionTitle = [currentSection objectForKey:@"title"];
BOOL isOpen = [[currentSection objectForKey:@"isOpen"] boolValue];
NSString *arrowNmae = isOpen? @"arrowUp":@"arrowDown";

UIButton *button = [UIButton buttonWithType:UIButtonTypeCustom];
button.frame = CGRectMake(0.0f, 0.0f, 320.0f, 50.0f);
button.tag = section;
button.backgroundColor = [UIColor brownColor];
[button setTitle:sectionTitle forState:UIControlStateNormal];
[button addTarget:self action:@selector(didSelectSection:)
 forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];
[button setImage:[UIImage imageNamed:arrowNmae] forState:UIControlStateNormal];
return button;
}

Next:

- (void)didSelectSection:(UIButton*)sender {
//get current section
NSMutableDictionary *currentSection = [self.adresses objectAtIndex:sender.tag];

//get elements of section
NSArray *items = [currentSection objectForKey:@"items"];

//create array of indexes
NSMutableArray *indexPaths = [NSMutableArray array];
for (int i=0; i<items.count; i++) {
    [indexPaths addObject:[NSIndexPath indexPathForRow:i inSection:sender.tag]];
}

//get current state  of section is opened
BOOL isOpen = [[currentSection objectForKey:@"isOpen"] boolValue];

//set new state
[currentSection setObject:[NSNumber numberWithBool:!isOpen] forKey:@"isOpen"];

//animate of adding and deleting of cells
if (isOpen) {
    [self.tableView deleteRowsAtIndexPaths:indexPaths withRowAnimation:UITableViewRowAnimationTop];
} else {
    [self.tableView insertRowsAtIndexPaths:indexPaths withRowAnimation:UITableViewRowAnimationTop];
}

//reload button image
NSString *arrowNmae = isOpen? @"arrowDown.png":@"arrowUp.png";
[sender setImage:[UIImage imageNamed:arrowNmae] forState:UIControlStateNormal];
}

And you can customize this table, like you need. Example of drill down tables you can download here (click "Скачать" button)

share|improve this answer
2  
This is very complex, and I'd be wary of downloading something from a Russian site :-) –  Justin Amberson Aug 19 '13 at 20:36
    
Sorry for Russian. It'll be so long to register on english) Is it help? –  Kirill Aug 20 '13 at 6:19
    
While this info is good for drill down menus, I'm needing to drill down through a plist specifically, so id doesn't help much in my case. –  Tyrel Denison Aug 20 '13 at 19:25

You should pass the array of districts to a new view controller that can display them. The new view controller should have a property called districts, I would also recommend creating an initializer that accepts an array of districts which sets this property.

- (void)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView didSelectRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    NSArray *districts = [[self.content objectAtIndex:indexPath.row] valueForKey:@"districts"];
    DistrictsViewController *districtsvc =  
     [[DistrictsViewController alloc] initWithNibName:nil 
                                               bundle:nil 
                                            districts:districts];
    [self.navigationController pushViewController:districtsvc];
}

From your example I'm not sure where the school info would come from so if it is difficult to say if you would be able to easily create a single generic view controller to drill down from state to school.

share|improve this answer

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