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I'm getting a Call to a member function prepare() on a non-object error in my PHP when using PDO to select data that was sent via an AJAX call.

Searching around on StackOverflow I've found many answers to this error, but none work to fix my problem.

The weird part is that the other PHP files use the same PDO calls and work successfully, but this one is giving me the non-object error only.

To note, the PDO connection is identical to the other pages where it works, so I know that's not causing the problem.

Also, I have tested that the AJAX data sent is being received, and that is working too.

PHP Code

$mysql_user = "NotTelling";
$mysql_password = "DefinatelyNotThis";
try
{
    $dbh = new PDO("mysql:host=somehost;dbname=somename", $mysql_user, $mysql_password);
    $dbh->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);

    $username = $_POST['username'];
    $inPword = $_POST['password'];
    $lat =  $_POST['lat'];
    $lon =  $_POST['lon'];

    $loggedin = "";
    $password_hash = "";
    $loggedinstatus = "";
    $pts = "";

    function getLoginInfo()
    {
        $sth = $dbh -> prepare('SELECT pword, loggedin, points FROM login WHERE uname = :uname');
        $sth->bindParam(':uname', $username, PDO::PARAM_STR);
        while($row = $sth->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC))
        {
            echo $row['pword'];
            echo $row['loggedin'];
            echo $row['points'];
        }
        $password_hash = $fetch['pword'];
        $loggedinstatus = $fetch['loggedin'];
        $pts = $fetch["points"];

        if($password_hash === null || $loggedinstatus === null || $pts === null)
        {
            die(json_encode(array("message" => "none")));
        }
        else
        {           
            return "more";
        }
    }

    function checkLoginCreds()
    {
        if(crypt($inPword, $password_hash) === $password_hash)
        {
            switch($loggedinstatus)
            {
                case  "no":         
                    $sel = $dbh->prepare("UPDATE login SET loggedin='yes' WHERE uname = ?");
                    $sel->execute(array($username));
                    return "AllGood";
                    break;

                defaut:
                    return "alreadyin";
                    break;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            return "BadLogin";
        }
    }

    if(getLoginInfo() === "more")
    {
        echo json_encode(array("message" => checkLoginCreds()));
    }

    getLoginInfo();
}
catch(PDOException $e)
{
    echo $e->getMessage();
    file_put_contents('PDOErrors.txt', $e->getMessage(), FILE_APPEND);
}

Finally, here's the output when I var_dump() the PDO connection.

object(PDO)#1 (0) {}

share|improve this question
1  
$dbh isn't defined in your function. –  andrewsi Aug 19 '13 at 19:24
    
fixed the formatting @andrewsi –  copilot0910 Aug 19 '13 at 19:25
    
You should either define the whole thing in a class or connect to db in every function which requires db connection.. –  blo Aug 19 '13 at 19:26
    
@copilot0910 - that still doesn't solve the problem. $dbh is out of scope - either pass it into the function as a parameter, or declare it as a global. –  andrewsi Aug 19 '13 at 19:26
    
@blo I've seen the class approach yet don't know how do do it. Also, why does it not work in this file yet works in all the others? –  copilot0910 Aug 19 '13 at 19:27
show 2 more comments

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For this to work, you need to use the global variable scope, explained here: http://php.net/manual/en/language.variables.scope.php

$mysql_user = "NotTelling";
$mysql_password = "DefinatelyNotThis";
try
{
    $dbh = new PDO("mysql:host=somehost;dbname=somename", $mysql_user, $mysql_password);
    $dbh->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);

    $username = $_POST['username'];
    $inPword = $_POST['password'];
    $lat =  $_POST['lat'];
    $lon =  $_POST['lon'];

    $loggedin = "";
    $password_hash = "";
    $loggedinstatus = "";
    $pts = "";

    function getLoginInfo()
    {
        global $dbh, $username, $password_hash, $loggedinstatus, $pts;

        $sth = $dbh -> prepare('SELECT pword, loggedin, points FROM login WHERE uname = :uname');
        $sth->bindParam(':uname', $username, PDO::PARAM_STR);
        while($row = $sth->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC))
        {
            echo $row['pword'];
            echo $row['loggedin'];
            echo $row['points'];
        }
        $password_hash = $fetch['pword'];
        $loggedinstatus = $fetch['loggedin'];
        $pts = $fetch["points"];

        if($password_hash === null || $loggedinstatus === null || $pts === null)
        {
            die(json_encode(array("message" => "none")));
        }
        else
        {           
            return "more";
        }
    }

    function checkLoginCreds()
    {
        global $dbh, $inPword, $password_hash, $loggedinstatus, $username;

        if(crypt($inPword, $password_hash) === $password_hash)
        {
            switch($loggedinstatus)
            {
                case  "no":         
                    $sel = $dbh->prepare("UPDATE login SET loggedin='yes' WHERE uname = ?");
                    $sel->execute(array($username));
                    return "AllGood";
                    break;

                defaut:
                    return "alreadyin";
                    break;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            return "BadLogin";
        }
    }

    if(getLoginInfo() === "more")
    {
        echo json_encode(array("message" => checkLoginCreds()));
    }

    getLoginInfo();
}
catch(PDOException $e)
{
    echo $e->getMessage();
    file_put_contents('PDOErrors.txt', $e->getMessage(), FILE_APPEND);
}

But this can get messy very quickly.

I suggest you put the variables in an array or using OOP for a more robust solution: http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.php

share|improve this answer
add comment

This is how you can define it in a class..

class someClass {

  private $db;

  public function __construct(){


            $this->dbconnect();

    }

    private function dbconnect() {

      try { //try connection

        $dbh = new PDO('mysql:host=localhost;dbname=somenane', 'usernane', 'pass');

        $dbh->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_EMULATE_PREPARES, false); 
        $dbh->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);

        $this->dbh = $dbh;

      } catch (Exception $e) { //connection failed

        die("Oh no! It seems we took too long to respond");

      }

    }

    public function getLoginInfo() { 

      $sth = $this->dbh->prepare('SELECT pword, loggedin, points FROM login WHERE uname = :uname'); 
      $sth->bindParam(':uname', $username, PDO::PARAM_STR); 

      //cont the code

    }

}

Not sure if it's good enough..but it will work..

share|improve this answer
    
Connection in the every class is as bad as in every function. –  Your Common Sense Aug 19 '13 at 19:37
    
@YourCommonSense If you have the "Correct" solution, why don't you just share it? Wait, you DONT because there are many ways to approach this. –  copilot0910 Aug 19 '13 at 19:39
1  
All his function requires connection, what's the harm? –  blo Aug 19 '13 at 19:39
    
as well as all classes. which have to share a single connection, not create their own ones. which will result in as many connections as many objects they have. –  Your Common Sense Aug 19 '13 at 19:41
    
@copilot0910 , Your Common Sense is pretty good with codes.. –  blo Aug 19 '13 at 19:41
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