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I have several tables that have a UDID (unique ID) and some other information. I am trying to combine these tables such that every UDID appears once in the final table. The data in all of my input tables looks correct and makes good theoretical sense. However, when I look at output table I'm seeing the same data over and over.

Here is the query:

create table roi_wide_ss_gen_all as
select a.udid, a.src, a.tm8,a.tm7,a.tm6,a.tm5,a.tm4,a.tm3,a.tm2,a.tm1, a.t1, a.t2, a.t3, a.t4, a.t5,a.t6,a.t7,a.t8 
       , pf_m, female, asam, pf_50, pf_150, pf_250, pf_251 
from roi_wide_ss_gen a
    left outer join roi_wide_ss_gen_m b on (a.udid = b.udid)
    left outer join roi_wide_ss_gen_f c on (a.udid = c.udid)
    left outer join roi_wide_ss_gen_k d on (a.udid = d.udid) 
    left outer join roi_wide_ss_gen_50 e on (a.udid = e.udid)  
    left outer join roi_wide_ss_gen_150 f on (a.udid = f.udid) 
    left outer join roi_wide_ss_gen_250 g on (a.udid = g.udid)  
    left outer join roi_wide_ss_gen_251 h on (a.udid = h.udid)
    left outer join roi_wide_ss_gen_as i on (a.udid = i.udid)
;

Here are the first few rows of the output table:

             udid src tm8 tm7 tm6 tm5 tm4 tm3 tm2 tm1 t1 t2 t3 t4 t5 t6 t7 t8 pf_m female asam pf_50 pf_150 pf_250 pf_251
 2b4821ecf223b1f6   1   0   0   0   0   4   6   2   0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    0      1       1     0      0      0      0
 2b4821ecf223b1f6   1   0   0   0   0   4   6   2   0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    0      1       1     0      0      0      0
 2b4821ecf223b1f6   1   0   0   0   0   4   6   2   0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    0      1       1     0      0      0      0
 2b4821ecf223b1f6   1   0   0   0   0   4   6   2   0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    0      1       1     0      0      0      0
 2b4821ecf223b1f6   1   0   0   0   0   4   6   2   0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    0      1       1     0      0      0      0

if I let this continue for 100 rows then the data does eventually change a bit, like this

2b4821ecf223b1f6   1   0   0   0   0   4   6   2   0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    0      1       1     0      0      0      0         
2b4821ecf223b1f6   1   0   0   0   0   4   6   2   0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    0      1       1     0      0      0      0                         
a6ce599b8344bb4c   1   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    1      1       0     0      0      0      0
3f1448b00f8d8031   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1  0  1  1  1  0  0  0  0    1      1       0     0      0      0      0
fca0bd81bdc66de5   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  1    1      1       0     0      0      0      0
fca0bd81bdc66de5   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  1    1      1       0     0      0      0      0

but it's still not 1 row per UDID like it should be for most UDID's. I could've sworn I had this working correctly in the past, and yet...

share|improve this question
2  
Does any table has duplicate udid ? –  Igor Romanchenko Aug 19 '13 at 19:44
2  
Cheapest way to find out: comment them out one-by-one (or half of them) –  wildplasser Aug 19 '13 at 19:46
    
@wildplasser this exactly my way of finding such a things –  Roman Pekar Aug 19 '13 at 19:47
1  
and makes good theoretical sense In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice they are not. @Roman that is my way of building the query in the first place: start with the skeleton, add the meat later. –  wildplasser Aug 19 '13 at 19:49
2  
@a_horse_with_no_name I think he should find a cause of duplication before hiding it with distinct –  Roman Pekar Aug 19 '13 at 19:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There're should be a duplicate udid in one of your tables - if you have no unique constraint on udid, check result of

select udid from ... group by udid having count(*) > 1

on your tables to find out

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks again. Just to be 100% accurate -- I added the group by.... having count(*) > 1 ; to the final query, but the results are beautiful and this is exactly what I needed. –  Jason Aug 19 '13 at 20:09
1  
hmm.. What I've meant is try to FIND duplicate udid in your table by grouping and selecting data where count(*) > 1, not to add group by to your final query... –  Roman Pekar Aug 19 '13 at 20:10
    
I noticed that after the fact and I can go back and look for a duplicate in an input table... I guess I'll do that as soon as I get time... but the results look beautiful if I just add that to the final query... –  Jason Aug 19 '13 at 20:13
    
ok, but I've warned you :) it's better to do it earler than later, because it looks like there're duplicates in your table and you're thinking that there're not, and it could lead to some unexpected results sometimes –  Roman Pekar Aug 19 '13 at 20:17
    
thanks :) you're absolutely right and i will backtrack –  Jason Aug 19 '13 at 20:18

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