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I've got some javascript for {} loops which I use repeatedly throughout the project, they are all similar to this:

for (var i = 0; i < things.length; i++) {
    console.log(things[i]);
    // This may be different in different areas of the project
}

I minified the code, but the loops take up a lot of the minified code. Is there a way to shorten the above code to something like this:

loop {
    console.log(things[i]);
    // This may be different in different areas of the project
}

Probably not the above, but you get the idea. Any help would be much appreciated :)

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1  
It's not possible to modify the language itself, but you might consider using an iterator: forEach(). –  Jonathan Lonowski Aug 19 '13 at 21:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A jQuery-ish way to do that:

function each(arr, func) {
  for ( var i = 0; i < arr.length; ++i ) {
    func(arr[i]);
  }
}

can be called like:

each( things, function(thing) { console.log(thing); } );

or

each( things, function(thing) { console.log(thing); alert(thing); } );

etc.

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Or you know... each(things, console.log) –  Andrew Clark Aug 19 '13 at 21:20
1  
True, as long as you're only ever calling a single, predefined function. –  Paul Roub Aug 19 '13 at 21:21
    
This looks good –  aNewStart847 Aug 19 '13 at 21:22

If you are repeatedly printing different arrays, you could make a function for it to cut your repetition down:

function printArray(arr) {
    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        console.log(arr[i]);
    }
}

then call like:

printArray(things);

If you are doing more than just printing and want it to be more universal, you should use a callback, like this:

function loopArr(arr, cb) {
    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        cb(arr[i]);
    }
}

and this could be called like:

loopArr(thing, function (i) {
    console.log(i);
});

Fiddle


Also there are tools that can already do this for you, for instance if you are using (or would want to use) jQuery, you could use jQuery.each()

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Excellent suggestion. –  cale_b Aug 19 '13 at 21:18
    
The thing is that the console.log() part is different in different areas of the project. I'll add that, sorry –  aNewStart847 Aug 19 '13 at 21:19
    
I would suggest getting the value of the length property and using that instead of re-accessing the property with each iteration. –  Justin Aug 19 '13 at 21:29
    
@smerny I won't deny that is a possibility, but odds are if they are modifying the array, it would be the current element and have no impact on the length and if they are adding to the array during the loop, well that seems dangerous and not very practical. If this is the case, not even the jQuery version would help as it also sets a variable to the value of the length property for use. –  Justin Aug 20 '13 at 13:16
    
@Justin, check this erichynds.com/blog/javascript-length-property-is-a-stored-value –  smerny Aug 20 '13 at 13:38

You'd have to pass in the item and the callback, but of course it's possible.

function loop (item, callback) {
    for (var i = 0; i < item.length; i++) {
        callback(item[i]);
    }
}

Useage:

loop(things, function (item) {
    console.log('do things here with each ' + item);
});

Also note that in more modern browsers you could simply do:

things.forEach(function (item) { 
    /* do whatever */
});
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function forEach(array, func) {
    var i = array.length;
    while(i--) {
        func(array[i]);
    }
}
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Everyone beat my to it, but here is another way to write it

function forEach(collection, callback){
    var e;

    for (var i = 0; e = collection[i++];) {
        callback(e);
    }
}

And its' usage:

var a = ["The", "Brown", "Cow"];

forEach(a, function(e) { console.log(e); });

Should be mentioned that there are tons of implementations of iterator functions. Your exact case my need to improve upon these.

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Why was this downvoted? –  Justin Aug 20 '13 at 12:53

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