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How would I append a file to an existing tar archive in Go? I don't see anything obvious in the docs on how to do it.

I have a tar file that has already been created and I want to add more to it after it has already been closed.

EDIT

Altering the example in the docs and following the answer given, I'm still not getting the expected result. The first three files are being written to the tar but when I close and open up the file again to write to it, the new file is never being written. The code runs fine. I don't know what I'm missing.

The following code gives me a tar file with three files in it: readme.txt, gopher.txt, todo.txt. foo.bar never gets written.

package main

import (
    "archive/tar"
    "log"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    f, err := os.Create("/home/jeff/Desktop/test.tar")
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatalln(err)
    }

    tw := tar.NewWriter(f)

    var files = []struct {
        Name, Body string
    }{
        {"readme.txt", "This archive contains some text files."},
        {"gopher.txt", "Gopher names:\nGeorge\nGeoffrey\nGonzo"},
        {"todo.txt", "Get animal handling licence."},
    }
    for _, file := range files {
        hdr := &tar.Header{
            Name: file.Name,
            Size: int64(len(file.Body)),
        }
        if err := tw.WriteHeader(hdr); err != nil {
            log.Fatalln(err)
        }
        if _, err := tw.Write([]byte(file.Body)); err != nil {
            log.Fatalln(err)
        }
    }
    if err := tw.Close(); err != nil {
        log.Fatalln(err)
    }
    f.Close()

    // Open up the file and append more things to it

    f, err = os.OpenFile("/home/jeff/Desktop/test.tar", os.O_APPEND|os.O_WRONLY, os.ModePerm)
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatalln(err)
    }
    tw = tar.NewWriter(f)

    test := "this is a test"

    hdr := &tar.Header{
        Name: "foo.bar",
        Size: int64(len(test)),
    }

    if err := tw.WriteHeader(hdr); err != nil {
        log.Fatalln(err)
    }

    if _, err := tw.Write([]byte(test)); err != nil {
        log.Fatalln(err)
    }

    if err := tw.Close(); err != nil {
        log.Fatalln(err)
    }
    f.Close()

}
share|improve this question
    
commenting out the trailer section will result in an invalid tar file. It's probably a bad idea. –  Jeremy Wall Aug 20 '13 at 22:11
    
that's what I was thinking but I can still access it like a normal tar file –  Jeff Aug 20 '13 at 22:55
    
@Jeff have a look at the answer I provided. Using Seek is still slightly dodgy, but it does result in a valid tar file. –  Intermernet Aug 21 '13 at 0:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The tar file specification states:

A tar archive consists of a series of 512-byte records. Each file system object requires a header record which stores basic metadata (pathname, owner, permissions, etc.) and zero or more records containing any file data. The end of the archive is indicated by two records consisting entirely of zero bytes.

The Go implementation of adding these two zero filled records happens here .

To get around the tar file format trailer (basically 1024 bytes of nothing) you could replace the lines:

f, err = os.OpenFile("/home/jeff/Desktop/test.tar", os.O_APPEND|os.O_WRONLY, os.ModePerm)
if err != nil {
    log.Fatalln(err)
}
tw = tar.NewWriter(f)

With:

f, err = os.OpenFile("/home/jeff/Desktop/test.tar", os.O_RDWR, os.ModePerm)
if err != nil {
    log.Fatalln(err)
}
if _, err = f.Seek(-2<<9, os.SEEK_END); err != nil {
    log.Fatalln(err)
}
tw = tar.NewWriter(f)

It opens the file read / write (instead of append / write-only) and then seeks to 1024 bytes before the end of the file and writes from there.

It works, but it is a horrible hack.

EDIT: After understanding the tar file spec a little better, I no longer believe this is such a hack.

Full code: http://play.golang.org/p/0zRScmY4AC

share|improve this answer
    
IIRC tar archives are padded to the next block anyway, so this seeking is not neccessary. –  FUZxxl Aug 20 '13 at 9:49
    
@FUZxxl, you're very likely correct. With the test code given it didn't work without dropping the last 1024 bytes before writing to the file. As I said, it's a hack that just reverses the final action of the tar.Close() function. See golang.org/src/pkg/archive/tar/writer.go?s=8343:8486#L305 . –  Intermernet Aug 20 '13 at 10:33
    
If you have a look at the source file writer.go, observe tw.pad. Each file is padded to the next full block. –  FUZxxl Aug 20 '13 at 10:47
    
@FUZxxl, I've updated my answer with a link to the tar file spec explaining why this works. –  Intermernet Aug 20 '13 at 11:06
2  
I don't think it's a horrible hack at all, it's well within the bounds of the specification and would only fail on files wherein the last 1024 bytes are not trailer blocks. Of course, this would only happen if, for example, you created your own tar package (copied the source) and commented out the trailer section on the tw.Close() call. –  kibibu Aug 21 '13 at 5:12

It's just a writer interface so write bytes to it after writing your files header.

import (
  "archive/tar"
  "os"
)

f, err := os.OpenFile(path, os.O_APPEND|os.O_WRONLY, os.ModePerm)
if err != nil {
// handle error here
}

hdr := tar.Header{}
// populate your header
tw := tar.NewWriter(f)
// append a file
tw.WriteHeader(hdr)
tw.Write(content_of_file_as_bytes)

http://golang.org/pkg/archive/tar/#Writer tells you all you need to know.

EDIT: It turns out that tar files get a trailer written to the end when it's closed. So even though you are writing new data to the tar archive it won't be read past that trailer. So instead it looks like you'll have to read in the tar archive first and then rewrite the whole archive to disk which is suboptimal. The package doesn't support the necessary stuff to append to them though so that's the best I can recommend right now.

share|improve this answer
    
it's a good idea that we can look into its implementation : code.google.com/p/go/codesearch#go/src/pkg/archive/tar/… –  nXqd Aug 19 '13 at 23:17
    
Thanks for your time. That's what I was expecting but I can't get it to work. I've edited my question to show the code sample I'm using. –  Jeff Aug 19 '13 at 23:48
    
It looks like the trailer may be a 1KB empty byte slice so shouldn't be too hard to deal with. See golang.org/src/pkg/archive/tar/writer.go?s=8343:8486#L305 ("zeroBlock" is a var currently defined as a 512B byte slice) –  Intermernet Aug 20 '13 at 7:08
    
@Jeff and Jeremy, See my hackish answer for a way around the tar file trailer issue. Hope it helps, it seems to work. –  Intermernet Aug 20 '13 at 8:59
    
yeah I did the same thing when I was investigating but decided that was probably a terrible thing to recommend on stack overflow. Glad someone else did :-) –  Jeremy Wall Aug 20 '13 at 22:10

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