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Consider a code sample.

  1. Is this some pattern which I am not aware of ?

  2. How to clean this clutter ?

    int func1val = func1();
    boolean val = checkIfTrue(func1val);
    if (val) {
        int func2val = func2();
        val = checkIfTrue(func2val);
        if (val) {
            int func3val = func3();
            val = checkIfTrue(func3val);
        }
    }
    
    if (val) {
    // print func1val, func2val, func3val, 
    } 
    
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closed as primarily opinion-based by bmargulies, Nathaniel Ford, Kissaki, danielbeard, SheetJS Aug 20 '13 at 0:03

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It looks like you're printing out those three values if and only if checkIfTrue returns true for all three. Barring some implementation detail of checkIfTrue, couldn't you do something like

int func1val = 0, func2val = 0, func3val = 0; // any value here
if (checkIfTrue(func1val = func1()) && checkIfTrue(func2val = func2()) && checkIfTrue(func3val = func3())) {
    // print func1val, func2val, func3val
}

To be fair, something like

int func1val = func1();
if (checkIfTrue(func1val)) {
    int func2val = func2();
    if (checkIfTrue(func2val)) {
        int func3val = func3();
        if (checkIfTrue(func3val)) {
            // print func1val, func2val, func3val
        }
    }
}

ought to do the same thing, and may be more readable depending on the actual situation.

share|improve this answer

How to clean it is with mid-method returns.

int func1val = func1();
boolean val = checkIfTrue(func1val);
if (!val) return;
int func2val = func2();
val = checkIfTrue(func2val);
if (!val) return;
int func3val = func3();
val = checkIfTrue(func3val);
if (!val) return;

// print func1val, func2val, func3val, 

And then you don't even need val; just inline each occurrence:

int func1val = func1();
if (!checkIfTrue(func1val)) return;
int func2val = func2();
if (!checkIfTrue(func2val)) return;
int func3val = func3();
if (!checkIfTrue(func3val)) return;

// print func1val, func2val, func3val, 
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1  
Downvoters, please leave comments. –  GManNickG Aug 19 '13 at 22:49

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