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  • Platform: x86 Linux 3.2.0 (Debian 7.1)
  • Compiler: GCC 4.7.2 (Debian 4.7.2-5)

I am writing a function that generates a "random" integer by reading allocated portions of memory for "random" values. The idea is based on the fact that uninitialized variables have undefined values. My initial idea was to allocate an array using malloc() and then use its uninitialized elements to generate a random number. But malloc() tends to return NULL blocks of memory so I cannot guarantee that there is anything to read. So I thought about reading a separate processes memory in order to almost guarantee values other than NULL. My current idea is somehow finding the first valid memory address and reading from there down but I do not know how to do this. I tried initializing a pointer to NULL and then incrementing it by one but if I attempt to print the referenced memory location a segmentation fault occurs. So my question is how do I read a separate processes memory. I do not need to do anything with the memory other than read it.

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What's a 'NULL block of memory'? One that is initialized to all bytes zero? Or something else? –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 20 '13 at 0:56
    
Separately from that, people get upset if your process reads their process's memory; you could be reading passwords, credit card numbers, social security numbers, or all sorts of other stuff that the o/s is supposed to keep private to the process. You'd have to be root to read an arbitrary other user's process; you can read your own process's memory if you really want to, but you really don't because you are not dealing with truly random values. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 20 '13 at 0:57
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/dev/[u]random is just so much more random, and so much less problematic. –  nneonneo Aug 20 '13 at 3:05
    
Reading uninitialised memory (as generalisation to variables) provokes undefined behaviour. Do not do this! –  alk Aug 20 '13 at 6:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The idea is based on the fact that uninitialized variables have undefined values.

They are undefined in as far as you cannot predict what they contain. It is mostly OS dependent what they really contain.

Back in old DOS days, you could maybe rely on the fact that if you executed several programs in the current session, there was garbage in the memory. But even then the data wasn't a reliable source of randomness.

Nowadays, things are different.

  • If you have variables on the stack, and in the corrent program run you were never as deep on the stack as now, your local variables are 0. Otherwise, they contain the data from previous function calls.

  • If you malloc() and the libc takes the returned memory from the pool of already used memory, it might contain garbage as well. But if it newly gets it from the OS, it is zeroed.

My initial idea was to allocate an array using malloc() and then use its uninitialized elements to generate a random number. But malloc() tends to return NULL blocks of memory so I cannot guarantee that there is anything to read.

(Not NULL, but 0 or NUL.) See my last point: it depends on the history of the malloc()ed area.

So I thought about reading a separate processes memory in order to almost guarantee values other than NULL.

You cannot, as processes are separated and shielded from each other.

As others said, there are better sources of randomness. /dev/random if you definitely need real entropy, /dev/urandom otherwise.

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The idea is based on the fact that uninitialized variables have undefined values.

No, you can't. They have garbage value, which means whatever happens to be in that memory, they are not random.

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You can't read a separate processes memory, the kernel protects you from doing that because it usually happens because of an error in setting up your pointers. Even if they were possible, you wouldn't be getting anything near a random integer. Why not read from /dev/random instead?

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Random numbers have certain special properties. Computer memory in general doesn't satisfy those properties.

If I sampled computer memory, tons of it would be quite similar, and certain numbers would have such a low probability of existing, that they might not even be found within the entire memory of a computer.

That's not to mention that if I read a bit of memory that's outside of the memory allocated to a program, the OS will kill me dead with a SEGFAULT.

It's a bad idea, on many levels. Use a proper random number generator.

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Generating random numbers in computers by software is HARD (there are hardware random number generators). Memory in a new program is a terrible source, especially early on, as the OS has zeroed all of memory before it starts the program. Any non-zeros you see are left over from initialization code leaving it's dirt behind.

Assuming you want so "do it yourself" numbers, the micro/nano-second digits of the time are an old-style solution... the theory is show below... play with your own numbers. Modulo with a large prime would be good. Just be sure to discard anything above 1/1,000's of a second.

   (long long)(nano * 1E10 ) % 1000

This assume you are starting by a manual command rather than a scheduled job.

If you are running on UNIX look into reading a few bytes from /dev/urandom, or with proper care,/dev/random (read the man page).

Windows has it's own API. In perl,

   new Win32::API "advapi$b32","CryptAcquireContextA",'PNNNN','N' ||
                     die "$^E\n"; # Use MS crypto or die

The serious work good random number generators take to get good numbers is beyond a quick response here; such usually rely on hardware, such as timestamping interrupts.

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