Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying a very simple test query on a forked MPP version of postgreSQL 8.2 and I am trying to figure out if this is expected behavior.

When I do an insert statement for a single row using current_date I get the expected output for the current date:

create table test( t_date timestamp without time zone);

insert into test(  t_date)
VALUES
(
current_date::date
),


 db=> select * from test ;
           t_date        
    ---------------------
     2013-08-19 00:00:00
    (1 row)

But when I add more than one row to the insert statement I get an unexpected result - is this part of the standard?

insert into test(  t_date)
VALUES
(
current_date::date
),
(
current_date::date
);

   db=>  select * from test ;
           t_date        
    ---------------------
     1999-12-31 00:00:00
     1999-12-31 00:00:00
    (2 rows)

My question is : Why does the first insert statement output the correct date when I use current_date::date and the second insert outputs two incorrect dates when I use the same current_date::date cast?

share|improve this question
2  
PostgreSQL 8.2.(what)? On what platform? You're using a pretty ancient and unsupported version. The results I get on 9.2.4 are exactly what you would expect. –  Craig Ringer Aug 20 '13 at 4:17
    
I am working on an MPP database called Greenplum that is forked off Postgresql so I cant control the fact that it is old. I am trying to determine if this is a bug in the platform we are on or genuine expected output. –  user7980 Aug 20 '13 at 4:18
    
Well, it would help if you'd mentioned that - "I'm using Greenplum 4.2, which is based on PostgreSQL 8.2". I've updated the tags. –  Craig Ringer Aug 20 '13 at 4:22
    
I can reproduce the issue on our installation of Greenplum 4.2. –  lucas Aug 23 '13 at 14:02
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That result is incorrect, unexpected, and bizarre.

PostgreSQL 9.2.4 produces the correct result.

regress=> select * from test;
       t_date        
---------------------
 2013-08-20 00:00:00
 2013-08-20 00:00:00
(2 rows)

as does 8.3, the oldest version I can be bothered testing.

Whatever patched / hacked up version of PostgreSQL you're using has introduced a bug.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks that is very helpful I guess the only thing to do is check it on 8.2 and then file a JIRA if all else fails... –  user7980 Aug 20 '13 at 4:21
2  
@user7980 I'd just file a bug with greenplum directly. The result of that query is clearly and obviously incorrect irrespective of how 8.2 behaves. –  Craig Ringer Aug 20 '13 at 4:25
add comment

Yeah, that's a feature of Postgresql to allow "bulk" loading using the VALUES clause. http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.2/static/sql-insert.html

See the section under:

To insert multiple rows using the multirow VALUES syntax:

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but I still expect that output for the second insert statement to be 2013-08-19 00:00:00 like in the first insert. The document you linked to does not resolve my question. –  user7980 Aug 20 '13 at 4:16
    
Oh, my answer was entirely useless, sorry. I somehow skipped over the relevant part of your question entirely. –  bma Aug 20 '13 at 4:19
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.