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I am getting errors on following lines of code.I am trying to pass vector p's element p[0],p[1],p[2],p[3] to the function distance.

typedef struct {
     long long x,y;
} point; 

long long distance (point A,point B)
{
    int d1 = A.x - B.x ;
    int d2 = A.y - B.y ;
    long long d = d1 * d1 + d2 *d2 ;
    return d ;
}

 //in main function I declared vector <point> p and took input and then,
    x1 = distance (p[0],p[1]) ; // this line is causing error
    x2 = distance (p[1],p[2]) ; // this line is causing error
    x3 = distance (p[2],p[3]) ; // this line is causing error
    x4 = distance (p[3],p[0]) ; // this line is causing error

errors generated :

In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_algobase.h:66:0,
                 from /usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/char_traits.h:41,
                 from /usr/include/c++/4.6/ios:41,
                 from /usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:40,
                 from /usr/include/c++/4.6/iostream:40,
                 from d.cpp:19:
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_iterator_base_types.h: In instantiation of ‘std::iterator_traits<point>’:
d.cpp:83:27:   instantiated from here
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_iterator_base_types.h:166:53: error: no type named ‘iterator_category’ in ‘struct point’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_iterator_base_types.h:167:53: error: no type named ‘value_type’ in ‘struct point’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_iterator_base_types.h:168:53: error: no type named ‘difference_type’ in ‘struct point’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_iterator_base_types.h:169:53: error: no type named ‘pointer’ in ‘struct point’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_iterator_base_types.h:170:53: error: no type named ‘reference’ in ‘struct point’

Help is needed.

share|improve this question

It's most likely because you have

using namespace std;

in your code. This makes the compiler think you are referencing std::distance instead of your function.

The obvious solution, and what I really recommend, is to stop with using namespace std; in your code. In the meantime you could try calling your function using the global scope, like

x1 = ::distance (p[0],p[1]);
share|improve this answer
    
yes , It is working now.I have never seen std::distance before. – aroup Aug 20 '13 at 6:10
3  
@aroup It is very important to stress how disruptive using namespace std can be. You should try no tot use it anywhere, except probably in very small scopes, in which case it yields no advantage anyway. Unfortunately, whenever I say it I get into big fights with others who believe it is perfectly safe to use it indiscriminately in implementation files. It is not, as you have found out. – juanchopanza Aug 20 '13 at 6:17

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