Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Ok, so I'm using python to learn socket programming. I'll move on to c in due time.

I thought that I would write a silly game to learn sockets with; feel free to use the source code yourself (.bmp files are 50x50 pixel images that I made in gimp). The server does not work at this point. (I'm pretty sure that it's hanging on the "c, addr = s.accept()")

I think a way to handle this is by using two threads. One thread to handle the communication server-side. And one thread to handle the game loop, also server side. The goal is to be able to play the game on both the server and the client. I've read that the 'twisted module' can handle multi-threading, I've never done multi-threading before, but it's supposed to be fairly non-trivial to do.

Secondly, I want to implement the communication between the server and the client in such a way that I don't overload the network and irritate my ISP (Internet Service Provider, for the less experienced developers). Is there a way that I can test the network and see how much information is actually getting passed between the server and the clients?

Right now, I only have small amount of information being passed between the client and server (information is only passed when players interact with the client or server by pushing a button). Is there a smarter message passing model that I should use instead?

GameServer.py

import pygame, sys, os
from pygame.locals import *
import socket

s = socket.socket()

host = socket.gethostname()
port = 6000
s.bind(('0.0.0.0',port))

s.listen(5)
#while True:
#   c, addr = s.accept()
#   print 'Got connection from', addr
#   c.send('Hi blork, I am not rational either, but this works.  So I am happy!')

#   c.close()


window = pygame.display.set_mode((640,50))

pygame.display.set_caption("My Trivial Network Game:  Get to the right side of the screen!")

class Ship():
    xvel = 0
    yvel = 0
    x = 0 
    y = 0
    image = pygame.image.load('ship.bmp')

    def physics(self):
        self.x += self.xvel
        self.y += self.yvel
        return self

class Bolt():
    xvel = 0
    yvel = 0 
    x = 640
    y = 0
    image = pygame.image.load('bolt.bmp')

    def physics (self):
        self.x += self.xvel
        self.y += self.yvel
        return self


def input(events):
    for event in events:
        if event.type == pygame.KEYDOWN:
            if event.key == pygame.K_ESCAPE:
                sys.exit()
#           elif event.key == pygame.K_f:
#               ship.xvel = 2
            elif event.key == pygame.K_z:
                bolt.xvel = -4
                s.send('zap')
                pygame.display.set_caption("Oh no!  Jon's being a dork!!")
                c.close()
        if event.type == QUIT:
            sys.exit(0)

#def MakeShip():
#   pygame

ship = Ship()
bolt = Bolt()
box = pygame.Rect(0,0,640,50)

loopVal = 0
while True:
    pygame.draw.rect(window,(0,0,0),box,0)

    window.blit(ship.image, (ship.x,ship.y))
    window.blit(bolt.image, (bolt.x,bolt.y))

    if loopVal == 0:
        loopVal += 1
        c, addr = s.accept()
        print "Now have connection from address:  ", addr

    input(pygame.event.get())

    ship.physics()
    bolt.physics()

    pygame.display.update()

    if (ship.x > 640):
        pygame.display.set_caption("You win!")

GameClient.py

import pygame, sys, os
from pygame.locals import *
import socket

s = socket.socket()

host = socket.gethostname()
port = 6000

window = pygame.display.set_mode((640,50))

pygame.display.set_caption("My Small Network Game:  Get to the right side of the screen!")

class Ship():
    xvel = 0
    yvel = 0
    x = 0 
    y = 0
    image = pygame.image.load('ship.bmp')

    def physics(self):
        self.x += self.xvel
        self.y += self.yvel
        return self

class Bolt():
    xvel = 0
    yvel = 0 
    x = 640
    y = 0
    image = pygame.image.load('bolt.bmp')

    def physics (self):
        self.x += self.xvel
        self.y += self.yvel
        return self


def input(events):
    for event in events:
        if event.type == pygame.KEYDOWN:
            if event.key == pygame.K_ESCAPE:
                sys.exit()
            elif event.key == pygame.K_f:
                ship.xvel = 2
#           elif event.key == pygame.K_z:
#               bolt.xvel = -4
#               pygame.display.set_caption("Oh no!  Jon's being a dork!!")
        if event.type == QUIT:
            sys.exit(0)

#def MakeShip():
#   pygame

ship = Ship()
bolt = Bolt()
box = pygame.Rect(0,0,640,50)

s.connect((host, port))
reply = s.recv(1024)

print reply

while True:

    pygame.draw.rect(window,(0,0,0),box,0)

    window.blit(ship.image, (ship.x,ship.y))
    window.blit(bolt.image, (bolt.x,bolt.y))

    input(pygame.event.get())

    ship.physics()
    bolt.physics()

    #reply = s.recv(1024)
    print "He replied with zap!"

    if reply == 'zap':
        bolt.xvel = -4
        pygame.display.set_caption("Oh no!  Jon's being a dork!!")

    pygame.display.update()

    if (ship.x > 640):
        pygame.display.set_caption("You win!")
share|improve this question
1  
You are unlikely to cause problems with your ISP for a simple networked game. I wouldn't worry too much about measuring the bandwidth usage. –  Amber Aug 20 '13 at 6:20
    
That's a relief. Umm... for future reference how would I go about measuring bandwidth usage? –  user2522001 Aug 20 '13 at 6:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are correct: s.accept() blocks until connection is established. The standard way is to use threads. This is the simpliest usage:

from threading import Thread

def server():
    while True:
        c, addr = s.accept()
        print 'Got connection from', addr
        c.send('Hi blork...')
        c.close()

t = Thread(target=server)
t.start()

Note however that once the connection is established you should listen for incoming data from that socket. One of the ideas is to create a separate thread for each connection:

from threading import Thread
from socket import SHUT_RDWR

def client(sock):
    while True:
        data = sock.recv(2048)
        if not data:
            break
        print data
    try:
        sock.shutdown(SHUT_RDWR)
        sock.close()
    except:
        pass

def server():
    while True:
        c, addr = s.accept()
        print 'Got connection from', addr
        c.send('Hi blork...')
        t = Thread(target=client, args=(c,))
        t.start()

t = Thread(target=server)
t.start()

If you are talking about a game (with probably no more then 20 open connections at a time) this should be efficient enough. You don't have to bother with some sophisticated stuff like Twisted (which generally is supposed to be used as a high traffic server).

As for ISP: you should not worry about that at all. One way to test bandwidth is to create yet one more thread which will ping a client (say every second) and the client will pong back the server. Then you just measure the difference in time.

share|improve this answer
1  
Is it really "the standard way"? It is one of two approaches; the other one works with select.select() and only calls accept() if it is proved not to block. –  glglgl Aug 20 '13 at 8:01
    
@glglgl "the standard way" refers to "keep the server in a seperate thread" so that the rest of the code can work without issues. Besides select (or any other asynchronous stuff) is not standard at all. It's difficult to work with it and it should be used only as a last resort (when efficiency matters) when everything else fails. –  freakish Aug 20 '13 at 8:07
    
Thank you, freakish. This is fantastic! There aren't enough kind words that I can use to describe you. –  user2522001 Aug 20 '13 at 16:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.