Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is this:

function Con () {
    var foo = 42;
    this.foo = foo
}

more slow than this:

function Con () {
    this.foo = 42;
}

On subsequent uses of the foo variable on an object returned by an invocation of the 'Con'-constructor? Ie. does it hurt if the variable has first been living in the closure of the constructor invocation?

EDIT: @FakeRainBrigand: Well, here you measure the time of constructing an object using the constructor. Right? I was rather thinking about subsequent uses of a constructed object, like this:

var myObj = new Con();
var bar = myObj.foo;

What is the time usage of the last line only (that is, the accessing of the variable foo) in the two cases?

share|improve this question
2  
it is slower, but nothing that'll hurt your performance –  No Idea For Name Aug 20 '13 at 6:46
    
They're not equivalent. In the first one you have two variables. If foo is not passed by reference (strings, numbers...) then foo and this.foo won't be in sync if you use foo. If you use this.foo then var foo doesn't help. –  elclanrs Aug 20 '13 at 6:48
    
This is one of those cases where the calls are so negligible that you are better off using what is more friendly for code readability than making the optimization. –  ars265 Aug 20 '13 at 11:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's slightly slower. Here's a performance test. It's more or less negligible, and there are nearly definitely other issues you should worry about. We can do this 60 million times per second, so worry about the things you can only do a few times per second.

performance test with code in original question


I changed the tests to not include actually making the constructor, and they became even more identical. This is likely due to internal optimizations. Here, the two fall into the margin of error.

second performance test

share|improve this answer
    
Well, here you measure the time of constructing an object using the constructor. Right? I was rather thinking about subsequent uses of a constructed object, like this: var myObj = new Con(); var bar = myObj.foo; What is the time usage of the latter statement only (that is, the accessing of the variable foo) in the two cases? –  loldrup Aug 20 '13 at 11:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.