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I would like to have my Gradle build to create a release signed apk file using Gradle.

I'm not sure if the code is correct or if I'm missing a parameter when doing gradle build?

This is some of the code in my gradle file:

android {
    ...
    signingConfigs {
          release {
              storeFile file("release.keystore")
              storePassword "******"
              keyAlias "******"
              keyPassword "******"
         }
     }
}

The gradle build finishes SUCCESSFUL, and in my build/apk folder I only see the ...-release-unsigned.apk and ...-debug-unaligned.apk files.

Any suggestions on how to solve this?

share|improve this question

15 Answers 15

This is a reply to user672009:

Gradle scripts can prompt for user input using the System.console().readLine method. The above code rewritten to use this will be:

...
signingConfigs {
    release {
        storeFile file(System.console().readLine("\n\$ Enter keystore path: "))
        storePassword System.console().readPassword("\n\$ Enter keystore password: ")
        keyAlias System.console().readLine("\n\$ Enter key alias: ")
        keyPassword System.console().readPassword("\n\$ Enter key password: ")
    }
}

This will prompt for each of the parameters.

Having said this, in these situations, you are better off setting environment variables for these parameters and using them in the gradle file. Environment variables can be accessed with System.getenv("<VAR-NAME>")

... 
signingConfigs {
    release {
        storeFile file(System.getenv("KEYSTORE"))
        storePassword System.getenv("KEYSTORE_PASSWORD")
        keyAlias System.getenv("KEY_ALIAS")
        keyPassword System.getenv("KEY_PASSWORD")
    }
}

Cheers

share|improve this answer
7  
FYI environment variables are visible to any programs that run as your user. The System.console().readLine option should be more secure. –  dpk Oct 4 '13 at 23:50
2  
Thanks. I most definitely prefer to be prompted. It's not too often that I compile for a release anyway. And @sdqali makes a very valid point. –  user672009 Oct 6 '13 at 22:54
27  
This works on the cli, but when I try to run a debug in Android Studio, I get the error: Cannot invoke method readLine() on null object. Anyone else getting this? –  SteveEdson Oct 30 '13 at 15:14
2  
@SteveEdson I am getting the same error as yours. –  zhaocong Nov 3 '13 at 15:18
9  
To protected password while writing, please use <code>storePassword new String(System.console().readPassword("\n\$ Enter keystore password: "))</code> and <code>keyPassword new String(System.console().readPassword("\n\$ Enter key password: "))</code> instead. –  ThanhHH Nov 13 '13 at 8:13
up vote 92 down vote accepted

I managed to solve it adding this code, and building with gradle build:

android {
    ...
    signingConfigs {
        release {
            storeFile file("release.keystore")
            storePassword "******"
            keyAlias "******"
            keyPassword "******"
        }
    }
    buildTypes {
        release {
            signingConfig signingConfigs.release
        }
    }
}

This generates a signed release apk file.

share|improve this answer
12  
Is there a way to make it prompt me for the passwords? Or other suggestions to keep passwords out of my git repos? –  user672009 Sep 18 '13 at 23:38
2  
I edit my build.gradle to look like yours but running "Built > Generate signed APK... " still gives my that dialog("See the Gradle User Guide for more info." etc.) and no APK. –  Semanticer Oct 5 '13 at 18:21
2  
@Semanticer Execute gradle build or gradlew build in Terminal/Prompt command –  Phillip Kamikaze Oct 5 '13 at 21:50
2  
@user672009 you can put passwords in a properties file and exclude it from repos with .gitignore. You can see this link.gist.github.com/gabrielemariotti/6856974 –  Gabriele Mariotti Oct 6 '13 at 17:51
    
@GabrieleMariotti That still leaves an incomplete repository. A better way would be to create a skeleton signing.properties and after committing issuing "git update-index --assume-unchanged signing.properties". However that prevents futura edits from being committed. Something like the first option sdqali suggests seems even better. –  user672009 Oct 6 '13 at 19:19

Easier way than previous answers:

Put this into ~/.gradle/gradle.properties

RELEASE_STORE_FILE={path to your keystore}
RELEASE_STORE_PASSWORD=*****
RELEASE_KEY_ALIAS=*****
RELEASE_KEY_PASSWORD=*****

Modify your build.gradle like this:

...    
signingConfigs {

   release {
       storeFile file(RELEASE_STORE_FILE)
       storePassword RELEASE_STORE_PASSWORD
       keyAlias RELEASE_KEY_ALIAS
       keyPassword RELEASE_KEY_PASSWORD
   }
}

buildTypes {
        release {
            signingConfig signingConfigs.release
        }
}
....

Then you can run gradle assembleRelease

share|improve this answer
2  
Best method if you ask me. Saves nothing in my project folder/SVN and I can checkout 10 versions of my projects without having to worry about the keys. –  Frank Jan 21 at 10:01
3  
If you're using gradlew on Windows, you need to be sure GRADLE_USER_HOME is defined as an environment variable to make this work. I set it to one directory above my project directory, and put my keystore there. The path to your keystore in gradle.properties should use forward slashes (/) or double backslashes (\\), not Windows single backslashes. To create a keystore from the Windows command prompt, see stackoverflow.com/questions/3997748/how-can-i-create-a-keystore –  Anachronist Feb 6 at 23:15
1  
Is the path relative to where the build.gradle file is located, or relative to the machines root directory? –  Prem Mar 19 at 13:55
    
@Prem, file() always assumes relative paths. Use new File(path) if you want it to be treated as absolute. –  ars-longa-vita-brevis Jul 14 at 9:55
    
+1 Thanks man. Nice touch. Thanks for sharing with us. You saved my day ;) –  Ragnar Sep 8 at 13:04

Note that @sdqali's script will (at least when using Gradle 1.6) ask for the password anytime you invoke any gradle task. Since you only need it when doing gradle assembleRelease (or similar), you could use the following trick:

android {
    ...
    signingConfigs {
        release {
            // We can leave these in environment variables
            storeFile file(System.getenv("KEYSTORE"))
            keyAlias System.getenv("KEY_ALIAS")

            // These two lines make gradle believe that the signingConfigs
            // section is complete. Without them, tasks like installRelease
            // will not be available!
            storePassword "notYourRealPassword"
            keyPassword "notYourRealPassword"
        }
    }
    ...
}

task askForPasswords << {
    // Must create String because System.readPassword() returns char[]
    // (and assigning that below fails silently)
    def storePw = new String(System.console().readPassword("Keystore password: "))
    def keyPw  = new String(System.console().readPassword("Key password: "))

    android.signingConfigs.release.storePassword = storePw
    android.signingConfigs.release.keyPassword = keyPw
}

tasks.whenTaskAdded { theTask -> 
    if (theTask.name.equals("packageRelease")) {
        theTask.dependsOn "askForPasswords"
    }
}

Note that I also had to add the following (under android) to make it work:

buildTypes {
    release {
        signingConfig signingConfigs.release
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
After implementing this, installRelease disappeared from the list of tasks... Why? –  Kaarel Oct 17 '13 at 18:32
1  
I've updated the script; this should fix your problem! –  caspase Oct 18 '13 at 19:11
1  
@caspase Wish I had taken your comment about that fake "storePassword" and "keyPassword" more seriously. Without initialising these properties ("" for example) the signed *-release.apk is not created, no error is displayed and your are left completely puzzled with just the *-release-unsigned.apk in your PROJECT_NAME/build/apk/ directory. Man... :/ –  vizZ Dec 2 '13 at 16:40
    
Thanks for the note about adding signingConfig under buildTypes -> Release. That solved automated signing for me! –  mm2001 Dec 14 '13 at 4:28
    
I made a simple gradle plugin that asks for passwords when building release apk (using mathod described in this post, but you will not need to define fake storePassword & keyPassword). It is also available in maven central. github.com/alexvasilkov/AndroidGradleSignPlugin –  Alex Vasilkov Feb 28 at 7:40

If you want to avoid hardcoding your keystore & password in build.gradle, you can use a properties file as explained here: HANDLING SIGNING CONFIGS WITH GRADLE

Basically:

1) create a myproject.properties file at /home/[username]/.signing with such contents:

keystore=[path to]\release.keystore
keystore.password=*********
keyAlias=***********
keyPassword=********

2) create a gradle.properties file (perhaps at the root of your project directory) with the contents:

MyProject.properties=/home/[username]/.signing/myproject.properties

3) refer to it in your build.gradle like this:

    if(project.hasProperty("MyProject.properties")
        && new File(project.property("MyProject.properties")).exists()) {

    Properties props = new Properties()
    props.load(new FileInputStream(file(project.property("MyProject.properties"))))

    signingConfigs {
        release {
            storeFile file(props['keystore'])
            storePassword props['keystore.password']
            keyAlias props['keyAlias']
            keyPassword props['keyPassword']
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Works great! Thank you. This code must be added before the buildTypes {} section and the section must declare the signingConfig signingConfigs.release as normal. –  theczechsensation Jun 23 at 4:09

This is a reply to user672009 and addition to sdqali's post (his code will crash on building debug version by IDE's "Run" button):

You can use the following code:

final Console console = System.console();
if (console != null) {

    // Building from console 
    signingConfigs {
        release {
            storeFile file(console.readLine("Enter keystore path: "))
            storePassword console.readLine("Enter keystore password: ")
            keyAlias console.readLine("Enter alias key: ")
            keyPassword console.readLine("Enter key password: ")
        }
    }

} else {

    // Building from IDE's "Run" button
    signingConfigs {
        release {

        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a way to have some default values? My keystore is usually the same. The storePassword usually the same as keyPassword and the keyAlias usually the project name in lower case. –  user672009 Oct 10 '13 at 19:03
    
@user672009 you can always use Java code inside of the script. –  AChep Oct 13 '13 at 16:42
1  
you might want to use something like this: keyPassword new String(console.readPassword("Enter key password: ")) to make sure your password is not displayed during input –  Alex Semeniuk Feb 11 at 10:29

(In reply to user672009 above.)

An even easier solution, if you want to keep your passwords out of a git repository; yet, want to include your build.gradle in it, that even works great with product flavors, is to create a separate gradle file. Let's call it 'signing.gradle' (include it in your .gitignore). Just as if it were your build.gradle file minus everything not related to signing in it.

android {
    signingConfigs { 
        flavor1 {
            storeFile file("..")
            storePassword ".."
            keyAlias ".."
            keyPassword ".."
        }
        flavor2 {
            storeFile file("..")
            storePassword ".."
            keyAlias ".."
            keyPassword ".."
        }
    }
}

Then in your build.gradle file include this line right underneath "apply plugin: 'android'"

 apply from: 'signing.gradle'

If you don't have or use multiple flavors, rename "flavor1" to "release" above, and you should be finished. If you are using flavors continue.

Finally link your flavors to its correct signingConfig in your build.gradle file and you should be finished.

  ...

  productFlavors {

      flavor1 {
          ...
          signingConfig signingConfigs.flavor1
      }

      flavor2 {
          ...
          signingConfig signingConfigs.flavor2
      }
  }

  ...
share|improve this answer
    
It is working, it is safe and it is easy to use! –  Morten Holmgaard Jul 23 at 11:05
    
Can you be a little more specific. I can't make it run: "cannot resolve symbol signingConfig". –  zatziky Sep 6 at 13:17

Like @Destil said but allow others who don't have the key to build: Easier way than previous answers:

Put this into ~/.gradle/gradle.properties

RELEASE_STORE_FILE={path to your keystore}
RELEASE_STORE_PASSWORD=*****
RELEASE_KEY_ALIAS=*****
RELEASE_KEY_PASSWORD=*****

Modify your build.gradle like this:

...    
if(project.hasProperty("RELEASE_STORE_FILE")) {
    signingConfigs {    
       release {
           storeFile file(RELEASE_STORE_FILE)
           storePassword RELEASE_STORE_PASSWORD
           keyAlias RELEASE_KEY_ALIAS
           keyPassword RELEASE_KEY_PASSWORD
       }
    }
}

buildTypes {
    if(project.hasProperty("RELEASE_STORE_FILE")) {
        release {
            signingConfig signingConfigs.release
        }
    }
}
....

Then you can run gradle assembleRelease OR gradle build

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android {
    compileSdkVersion 17
    buildToolsVersion "19.0.3"

    defaultConfig {
        minSdkVersion 9
        targetSdkVersion 18
    }

    File signFile = rootProject.file('sign/keystore.properties')
    if (signFile.exists()) {
        Properties properties = new Properties()
        properties.load(new FileInputStream(signFile))
        signingConfigs {
            release {
                storeFile rootProject.file(properties['keystore'])
                storePassword properties['storePassword']
                keyAlias properties['keyAlias']
                keyPassword properties['keyPassword']
            }
        }
    }

    buildTypes {
        release {
            runProguard true
            zipAlign true
            proguardFile rootProject.file('proguard-rules.cfg')
            signingConfig signingConfigs.release
        }
        debug {
            runProguard false
            zipAlign true
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Using Android Studio 0.5.1, Gradle 1.11, and Gradle plugin 0.9. –  Joao Ventura Mar 18 at 16:24
1  
Creating properties on demand (a.k.a. dynamic properties) has been deprecated and is scheduled to be removed in Gradle 2.0 –  Joao Ventura Mar 25 at 16:22
    
About the deprecation: forums.gradle.org/gradle/topics/6caj90zrfqr0l –  cprcrack 8 hours ago

Almost all platforms now offer some sort of keyring, so there is no reason to leave clear text passwords around.

I propose a simple solution that uses the Python Keyring module (mainly the companion console script keyring) and a minimal wrapper around Groovy ['do', 'something'].execute() feature:

def execOutput= { args ->
    def proc = args.execute()
    proc.waitFor()
    def stdout = proc.in.text
    return stdout.trim()
}

Using this function, the signingConfigs section becomes:

signingConfigs {
    release {
        storeFile file("android.keystore")
        storePassword execOutput(["keyring", "get", "google-play", storeFile.name])
        keyAlias "com.example.app"
        keyPassword execOutput(["keyring", "get", "google-play", keyAlias])
    }
}

Before running gradle assembleRelease you have to set the passwords in your keyring, only once:

$ keyring set google-play android.keystore # will be prompted for the passwords
$ keyring set google-play com.example.app

Happy releases!

share|improve this answer

You can also use -P command line option of gradle to help the signing. In your build.gradle, add singingConfigs like this:

signingConfigs {
   release {
       storeFile file("path/to/your/keystore")
       storePassword RELEASE_STORE_PASSWORD
       keyAlias "your.key.alias"
       keyPassword RELEASE_KEY_PASSWORD
   }
}

Then call gradle build like this:

gradle -PRELEASE_KEYSTORE_PASSWORD=******* -PRELEASE_KEY_PASSWORD=****** build

You can use -P to set storeFile and keyAlias if you prefer.

This is basically Destil's solution but with the command line options.

For more details on gradle properties, check the gradle user guide.

share|improve this answer

Yet another approach to the same problem. As it is not recommended to store any kind of credential within the source code, we decided to set the passwords for the key store and key alias in a separate properties file as follows:

key.store.password=[STORE PASSWORD]
key.alias.password=[KEY PASSWORD]

If you use git, you can create a text file called, for example, secure.properties. You should make sure to exclude it from your repository (if using git, adding it to the .gitignore file). Then, you would need to create a signing configuration, like some of the other answers indicate. The only difference is in how you would load the credentials:

android {
    ...
    signingConfigs {
        ...
        release {
            storeFile file('[PATH TO]/your_keystore_file.jks')
            keyAlias "your_key_alias"

            File propsFile = file("[PATH TO]/secure.properties");
            if (propsFile.exists()) {
                Properties props = new Properties();
                props.load(new FileInputStream(propsFile))
                storePassword props.getProperty('key.store.password')
                keyPassword props.getProperty('key.alias.password')
            }
        }
        ...
    }

    buildTypes {
        ...
        release {
            signingConfig signingConfigs.release
            runProguard true
            proguardFile file('proguard-rules.txt')
        }
        ...
    }
}

Never forget to assign the signingConfig to the release build type manually (for some reason I sometimes assume it will be used automatically). Also, it is not mandatory to enable proguard, but it is recommendable.

We like this approach better than using environment variables or requesting user input because it can be done from the IDE, by switching to the realease build type and running the app, rather than having to use the command line.

share|improve this answer
1  
Gradle doesn't compile using this: props = new Properties(); Cannot set the value of read-only property 'props' –  m3n0R Oct 21 at 17:36
    
You are right @m3n0R. I edited a line of my response to reflect the fix we had to introduce in our app so it would still compile using the latest versions of Gradle. Basically, props has to be declared as a local variable. –  Soflete Oct 22 at 2:44
    
^^ Good. Thanks, I already changed the downvote :) –  m3n0R Oct 22 at 8:08
    
how would this be adoptable using cloud CI/CD tools....the /path/to/keystore and /path/to/secure.props is throwing me....thanks for this though. –  sirvon Nov 9 at 5:53

I had several issues that I put the following line in a wrong place:

signingConfigs {
    release {
        // We can leave these in environment variables
        storeFile file("d:\\Fejlesztés\\******.keystore")
        keyAlias "mykey"

        // These two lines make gradle believe that the signingConfigs
        // section is complete. Without them, tasks like installRelease
        // will not be available!
        storePassword "*****"
        keyPassword "******"
    }
}

Make sure that you put the signingConfigs parts inside the android section:

android
{
    ....
    signingConfigs {
        release {
          ...
        }
    }
}

instead of

android
{
    ....
}

signingConfigs {
   release {
        ...
   }
}

It is easy to make this mistake.

share|improve this answer

I had quite a lot of fun figuring this one out. Here is my walk-through.

A to Z walk-through on how to create a gradle build file in IntelliJ (v.13.1.4) This walk-through assumes you know how to make a keystore file. For this tutorial to work you will need your keystore file to be located in your app folder and you will need to have your zipalign.exe file to be located in 'SDK-ROOT\tools'. This file is usually found in 'SDK-ROOT\build-tools' and under this folder it will be in the highest api folder (alpha or beta I recommend the alpha version).

For those of you that wish to jump straight in here is the gradle build file.

buildscript {
    repositories {
        mavenCentral()
    }
    dependencies {
        classpath 'com.android.tools.build:gradle:0.9.+'
    }
}
apply plugin: 'android'

repositories {
    mavenCentral()
}
android {
    compileSdkVersion 19
    buildToolsVersion '20.0.0'
    defaultConfig {
        minSdkVersion 8
        targetSdkVersion 19
        versionCode 1
        versionName "1.0"
    }
    signingConfigs {
        playstore {
            keyAlias 'developers4u'
            keyPassword 'thisIsNotMyRealPassword'
            storeFile file('developers4u.keystore')
            storePassword 'realyItIsNot'
        }
    }
    buildTypes {
        assembleRelease {
            debuggable false
            jniDebugBuild false
            runProguard true
            proguardFiles getDefaultProguardFile('proguard-android.txt'), 'proguard-rules.txt'
            zipAlign true
            signingConfig signingConfigs.playstore
        }
    }
}

dependencies {
    compile fileTree(dir: 'libs', include: ['*.jar'])
    compile 'com.android.support:support-v4:20.0.0'
    compile 'com.android.support:appcompat-v7:20.0.0'
}

You can build part of this build file (above) from menu option: File/Project Structure From here select Facets and click 'Android-Gradle(App). From here you will see tabs: 'Properties', 'Signing', 'Flavors', 'Build Types' and 'Dependencies' for this walk-through we will just be using 'Signing' and 'Build Types'. Under 'Build Types' (in the name section) enter any name that you wish to identify your build type configuration and in the other 4 fields enter your keystore information (setting the keystore path the the one under your app folder).

Under the 'Build Types' enter the value 'assembleRelease' into the name field, 'Debuggable' should be set to false, 'Jni Debug Build' should be false, set 'Run Proguard' to true and 'Zip Align' to true. This will generate build file, but not as depicted above, you will have to add a few things to the build file afterwards. The ProGuard file location here will be set manually in the gradle build file. (as depicted above)

The DSL containers you will have to add afterwards are as follows:

android {
    ....
    compileSdkVersion 19
    buildToolsVersion '20.0.0'
    defaultConfig {
        minSdkVersion 8
        targetSdkVersion 19
        versionCode 1
        versionName "1.0"
    }
    ....
}

You will also have to add:

dependencies {
    compile fileTree(dir: 'libs', include: ['*.jar'])
    compile 'com.android.support:support-v4:20.0.0'
    compile 'com.android.support:appcompat-v7:20.0.0'
}

note this DSL container above('dependencies') should be at the bottom of the config file but not inside the android DSL container. In order to build the dependencies container from the IntelliJ menu, select: File/Project Structure. From there select Facets again and then Android-Gradle(app). You will see the same 5 tabs as mentioned above. Select the 'Dependencies' tab and add the dependencies you require.

After all of this is done you should see a Gradle build file similar to the file at the top of this walk-through. To build your signed zip aligned release you will need to open the Gradle tasks. You can get to this window by selecting View/Tool Windows/Gradle. From here you can double Click 'assembleAssembleRelease. This should generate your deployable APK.

The potential problems that can occur when compiling your release are (but not limited to): Your Gradle build file being in the wrong place. There are two Gradle build files; one in your application root folder and another in the app folder under the application root. You must user the latter.

You may also have lint problems. (Note: Android Developer Studio is much better at spotting Lint problems than IntelliJ you will notice this when trying to generate an signed APK from the menu options)

To get around lint problems you will need to put the following DSL container inside the android container (at the top):

android {
        ....
    lintOptions {
        abortOnError false
    }
    ....
}

putting this inside your android DSL container will cause an error file to be generated in the build folder (directly under your app folder) the file name should be something like 'lint-results-release-fatal.html' this file will tell you the the class where the error occurred. Another file that will be generated is an XML file that contains the 'issue ID' associated with the lint error. The file name should be something like 'lint-results-release-fatal.xml'. Somewhere near the top of the file you will see a node 'issue' inside which you will see something similar to 'id="IDOfYourLintProblem"'

To correct this problem open the file in your project that was listed in the 'lint-results-assembleRelease-fatal.html' file and enter the following line of code in the Java Class file just above the class name: @SuppressLint("IDOfYourLintProblem"). You may have to import 'android.annotation.SuppressLint;'

So your java class file should appear like:

package com.WarwickWestonWright.developers4u.app.CandidateArea;

import android.annotation.SuppressLint;
... other imports

@SuppressLint("IDOfYourLintProblem")
public class SearchForJobsFragment extends Fragment {... rest of your class definition}

Note that suppressing lint errors is not always the best IDEA you may be better off to change your code that caused the lint errors.

Another problem that could potentially occur is if you have not set the environment variable for the Gradle HOME environment variable. This variable is named 'GRADLE_HOME' and should be set the the path of the gradle home directory, something like 'C:\gradle-1.12' Sometimes you may also want to set the environment variable for 'ANDROID_HOME' set this to 'YOUR-SDK-Root\sdk'

After this is done return to the Gradle tasks window and double click the assembleAssembleRelease.

If all is successful you should be able to go to the folder app\build\apk and find your deployable APK file.

share|improve this answer

To complement the other answers, you can also place your gradle.properties file in your own module folder, together with build.gradle, just in case your keystore is specific to one project.

share|improve this answer

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