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I was messing around with some simple JS code and came across the following:

document.body.innerHTML += '<div id="div1">some text</div>';

var my_div = document.getElementById('div1');

document.body.innerHTML += '<div id="div2">some text</div>';

my_div.innerHTML = "some other text"; //doesn't work

It would seem that after manipulating the parent element (the body) the reference to the DOM node is invalidated. What am I doing wrong here?

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Does it work without the third row? –  Niklas Aug 20 '13 at 7:46
    
@Niklas yes and also if you swap the 2nd and the 3rd line around. –  debel Aug 20 '13 at 7:56
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4 Answers

When you do this:

document.body.innerHTML += '<div id="div2">some text</div>';

it's the same as this:

document.body.innerHTML = document.body.innerHTML + '<div id="div2">some text</div>';

which as you can see replaces the whole of the body, recreating all the elements.

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Thanks, RichieHindle! –  debel Aug 20 '13 at 7:51
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You are not "manipulating" the innerHTML, you are overwriting it!

When you use += on .innerHTML the net result is that you end up serialising the entire DOM, appending the new string, and then deserialising the entire resulting HTML string back into DOM nodes. In the process, all existing DOM nodes get destroyed.

IMHO, you should never use .innerHTML to manipulate DOM nodes, you should only use it to create them.

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Thanks, Alnitak –  debel Aug 20 '13 at 7:50
    
I understand the stupidity of what I'm doing. I should not use .innerHTML at all, except if for some reason I need to parse row HTML. For DOM purposes I'm better off using document.createElement –  debel Aug 20 '13 at 8:00
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you can use like this:

document.body.innerHTML += '<div id="div1">some text</div>';

var my_div = document.getElementById('div1');

var div2 = document.createElement('div');
div2.id = 'div2';
div2.innerHTML = 'some text';

my_div.parentNode.insertBefore(div2, my_div);

my_div.innerHTML = "some other text"; //work
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it seems too easy to get it wrong that way. I was not considering how .innerHTML worked behind the scenes and couldn't understand the logic behind my browsers behavior. Thanks anyway :) –  debel Aug 20 '13 at 8:06
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You should use like this, I think it will work fine.

    <body>

    </body>

<script type="text/javascript">
document.body.innerHTML += '<div id="div1">some text</div>';

var my_div = document.getElementById('div1');

document.body.innerHTML += '<div id="div2">some text</div>';

my_div.innerHTML = "some other text"; //doesn't work
</script>
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