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I am attempting to modify the behavior of my objects using the decorator pattern but have hit a bit of a snag where the decorator pattern seems to fail to be able to change the functionality of my objects the way I want.

Here is a simple example of what I am trying to do:

I have a class with a getter for an int and some other "complex" that does some computation using the getter

public class MyClass implements MyInterface {
    private int value = 5;

    @Override
    public int getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    @Override
    public int complexStuff() {
        return 50 + getValue();
    }
}

I have an abstract decorator that just passes all the calls defined by the interface to a MyClass instance

public abstract class MyDecorator implements MyInterface {
    private MyClass decorated;

    public MyDecorator(MyClass decorated) {
        this.decorated = decorated;
    }

    @Override
    public int getValue() {
        return decorated.getValue();
    }

    @Override
    public int complexStuff() {
        return decorated.complexStuff();
    }
}

I want to be able to decorate a MyClass instance to modify the behaviour of the getValue() method in such a way that complexStuff() is also affected.

For example if I decorate a MyClass instance like this:

MyDecorator myDecorator = new MyDecorator(myClassInstance) {
    @Override
    public int getValue() {
        return 100;
    }
};

The way I have currently implemented this a call to myDecorator.getValue() would return 100, but a call to myDecorator.complexStuff() would return 55 as if the MyClass instance had not been decorated. What I want is for the call to myDecorator.complexStuff() to return 150.

Is there a way I can modify my use of the decorator pattern to achieve my desired result? Or some other pattern/solution I can use to get this to work how I want?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
I can't fathom a pleasant way to do this without coding the MyClass class to support a potential switch later. Is this an acceptable approach? –  Duncan Aug 20 '13 at 9:16
    
Im not sure what you mean, can you elaborate? –  Carl Minden Aug 20 '13 at 9:18
    
I've edited my answer below. It involves coding MyClass to support this kind of behavioural change. –  Duncan Aug 20 '13 at 9:26

2 Answers 2

If you can't modify MyClass, maybe you can derive from it and use the subclass instead? Then you can override getValue.

share|improve this answer
    
I want to do this at runtime to an existing MyClass instance –  Carl Minden Aug 20 '13 at 9:22
    
Sorry, not happening. The class is clearly not designed to give you an opportunity to dynamically intercept getValue, so you can't do it (without getting into really nasty things like BCEL). –  Sebastian Redl Aug 20 '13 at 9:47

I don't think you can achieve this goal using a decorator pattern. You are trying to modify the behaviour of an existing instance, which isn't going to be trivial (if even possible).

Something like the following would work:

public class MyClass implements MyInterface {
  private ValueProvider provider = new ValueProvider() {    
    @Override
    public int getValue() {
      return 5;
    }
  };

  // (You may wish to include this method in MyInterface)
  public void setValueProvider(ValueProvider provider) {
    this.provider = provider;
  }

  @Override
  public int getValue() {
      return provider.getValue();
  }

  @Override
  public int complexStuff() {
      return 50 + getValue();
  }
}

You can then substitute a different ValueProvider at runtime. A decorator class could do the substitution for you, if you want.

share|improve this answer
    
As I commented in another answer I want to do this with a MyClass instance I already have not one I construct, I corrected my code in my question –  Carl Minden Aug 20 '13 at 9:04
    
I see. That might be troublesome - I'll give it some thought. –  Duncan Aug 20 '13 at 9:07
    
unfortunately the actual objects I'm using are far more complex than this example and I want to be able to override any of their methods in this way so I don't think this solution would work very well as I would need a "Provider" for every method on the object which seems pretty awkward. –  Carl Minden Aug 20 '13 at 9:32
    
@CarlMinden So there are definitely times where the method will be called normally on that instance, but later you wish to decorate and alter the behaviour at runtime? –  Duncan Aug 20 '13 at 9:39
    
Also I want to be able to apply potentially multiple decorators to the same object affecting the same method. In the decorator pattern I can have 2 decorators that caller super.method() then do whatever they do and they will stack nicely but I don't see a way to do that with this method. –  Carl Minden Aug 20 '13 at 9:40

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