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I'm trying to save a dynamic array to a file but I'm having some issues. This is my current code:

/*********************************************************************
*
* ANSI C Example program:
*    Acq-IntClk.c
*
* Example Category:
*    AI
*
* Description:
*    This example demonstrates how to acquire a finite amount of data
*    using the DAQ device's internal clock.
*
* Instructions for Running:
*    1. Select the physical channel to correspond to where your
*       signal is input on the DAQ device.
*    2. Enter the minimum and maximum voltages.
*    Note: For better accuracy try to match the input range to the
*          expected voltage level of the measured signal.
*    3. Select the number of samples to acquire.
*    4. Set the rate of the acquisition.
*    Note: The rate should be AT LEAST twice as fast as the maximum
*          frequency component of the signal being acquired.
*
* Steps:
*    1. Create a task.
*    2. Create an analog input voltage channel.
*    3. Set the rate for the sample clock. Additionally, define the
*       sample mode to be finite and set the number of samples to be
*       acquired per channel.
*    4. Call the Start function to start the acquisition.
*    5. Read all of the waveform data.
*    6. Call the Clear Task function to clear the task.
*    7. Display an error if any.
*
* I/O Connections Overview:
*    Make sure your signal input terminal matches the Physical
*    Channel I/O Control. For further connection information, refer
*    to your hardware reference manual.
*
*********************************************************************/

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <NIDAQmx.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <windows.h>


#define DAQmxErrChk(functionCall) if( DAQmxFailed(error=(functionCall)) ) goto Error; else
FILE *save_file = NULL;

int main(void)
{
    int32       error=0;
    int32       amount; 
    int32       counter[2]={'0'};
    TaskHandle  taskHandle=0;
    int32       read;
    float64*    i_array;
    int         j;
    char        errBuff[2048]={'\0'};
    char        c = 64;
    char        filename[256];

    char        answer[2];
    const int       ia=0;
    const char      a = 0;

    i_array = (float64*)malloc(j*sizeof(int));

    /*********************************************/
    // DAQmx Configure Code
    /*********************************************/

    printf("Please enter the amount of voltage checks you wish to run.\n");

    while(scanf("%d%c", &amount, &c) !=2) // This is where the user inputs his data. If it isn't a number, it returns false and goes into the while loop.
    {
        getchar();
        puts("Please enter a number.");
    }
    for (j = 0; j < amount; j++) // Loops through the specified amount
    {
        DAQmxErrChk (DAQmxCreateTask("",&taskHandle));
        DAQmxErrChk (DAQmxCreateAIVoltageChan(taskHandle,"Dev1/ai0","",DAQmx_Val_Cfg_Default,1.0,10.0,DAQmx_Val_Volts,NULL));
        DAQmxErrChk (DAQmxCfgSampClkTiming(taskHandle,"",10000.0,DAQmx_Val_Rising,DAQmx_Val_FiniteSamps,1000));

        /*********************************************/
        // DAQmx Start Code
        /*********************************************/
        DAQmxErrChk (DAQmxStartTask(taskHandle));

        /*********************************************/
        // DAQmx Read Code
        /*********************************************/

        DAQmxErrChk (DAQmxReadAnalogF64(taskHandle,1000,10.0,DAQmx_Val_GroupByChannel,i_array,1000,&read,NULL));

        printf("Updating... ");
        printf("Data point %d has %f",j, i_array[j]); // Displays the voltage set number of times
        printf(" volts\n");
        Sleep(200); // ms pause between each reading

        if( taskHandle!=0 )
        {
            /*********************************************/
            // DAQmx Stop Code
            /*********************************************/
            DAQmxStopTask(taskHandle);
            DAQmxClearTask(taskHandle);
        }
    }

    if(j==amount)
    {
        printf("\nVoltage readings aquired. Please specify a filename so the data can be saved.\n");
        goto Save;
    }


Save:
    printf("\nPlease enter a filename...\n");
    gets(filename);
    printf("Name is: ");
    puts(filename);
    save_file = fopen(filename,"w");
    printf("File made");

        for (j = 0; j < amount; j++)
        {           
            fwrite(&i_array[j], sizeof(j), j, save_file);
                    printf("Saving...\nSaved.");
        }       

    getchar();
    free((void*) i_array);
Error:
    if( DAQmxFailed(error) )
        DAQmxGetExtendedErrorInfo(errBuff,2048);    

    if( DAQmxFailed(error) )                
        printf("DAQmx Error: %s\n",errBuff);

    return 0;
}

I'll explain my program. It uses a NI USB 6211 to measure inputs and outputs, and then displays it. This program is used to measure the amount of voltage coming into the ADC. It reads it just fine and my dynamic array also works as it should. Now, when it comes down to the actual writing the file:

for (j = 0; j < amount; j++)
{           
    fwrite(&i_array[j], sizeof(j), j, save_file);
    printf("Saving...\nSaved.");
}

I'm getting the error "Null pointer was passed for a required parameter". Now, I KNOW this is coming from my fwrite code block, but i've tried so many different ways of writing the code, but it just doesn't want to comply. I've tried using pointers and also not, it just won't write the data. (When I say data, I mean the voltage reading).

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you initialize i_array = (float64*) malloc (j * sizeof (int)) there are two issues:

  1. j is uninitialized. It has a garbage value. When you multiply it by sizeof (int) you are multiplying garbage. This will cause the memory allocation to have undefined results. You need to read amount first, then initialize using amount rather than j as the multiplier.
  2. You've declared i_array as a pointer to float64. In that case, your array elements need to be float64, not int.

So: after you get amount from input, allocate your array:

i_array = malloc (amount * sizeof (float64));

A couple of things: first, it is considered un-C-like to cast the return value of malloc; second, do not use gets, it is nonstandard as of C11. Use fgets instead:

fgets (filename, sizeof (filename), stdin);
share|improve this answer
    
Okay. j has been initialised, thank you for the explanation. I've used amount of the multiplier but if I change it to float then I just get more errors. It also won't even make the file if I use fgets –  Johnathan Brown Aug 20 '13 at 9:24
    
Change what to float? Not amount; change the sizeof to reflect the type of the array element. As @unwind suggests in his answer, use i_array = malloc (amount * sizeof (*i_array));. Also, fgets() is to get the filename, not to create the file. You should replace the call to gets() with one to fgets() for security reasons, and also for compliance with the current C standard. What happens when you use fgets()? What error do you get with writing the file? –  verbose Aug 20 '13 at 9:35
    
I modified it a little and followed some documentation from a book and got it to write the data. Thanks. –  Johnathan Brown Aug 20 '13 at 11:50

This:

i_array = (float64*)malloc(j*sizeof(int));

is screaming "broken code" very loudly. Note the mismatch of types, assuming that float64 is the same size as int sounds very dangerous.

It should be:

i_array = malloc(j * sizeof *i_array);
  1. Don't cast the return value of malloc() in C.
  2. Don't repeat the type, use sizeof on the target pointer to "lock" the types together.

Also, you should always check that malloc() succeeds, if j has a non-sensical value it will fail.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, "you should always check that malloc() succeeds" agree whole-heartedly to it –  Binayaka Chakraborty Aug 20 '13 at 9:02
    
Hmmm okay. If I use what you have suggested then I don't get that error anymore, but it still won't actually write anything. I'm fairly new to C, so i'm learning with my mistakes. Thank you for the link, makes a lot of sense. –  Johnathan Brown Aug 20 '13 at 9:08

I think your problem is that you don't initialize j

int j
//...
i_array = (float64*)malloc(j*sizeof(int));

so this is effectively

i_array = (float64*)malloc(0);

Try initialize your array once you know how many times your are going to loop like this:

while(scanf("%d%c", &amount, &c) !=2) // This is where the user inputs his data. If it isn't a number, it returns false and goes into the while loop.
{
    getchar();
    puts("Please enter a number.");
}

i_array = (float64*)malloc(amount*sizeof(int));

for (j = 0; j < amount; j++)
{
    //...
share|improve this answer
    
I think I understand where you are coming from, but without malloc(j*sizeof(int)) then the for loop won't operate. J increases in size j++ when the user enters the amount of voltage checks. –  Johnathan Brown Aug 20 '13 at 8:48
1  
@JohnathanBrown try and initialize the loop after the scanf –  Shane Haw Aug 20 '13 at 8:56

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