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Is there anyway of getting the current full rewritten URL in PHP on IIS.

For instance, I have a URL like:

http://www.domain.com/searchresults.php?section=99&page=1&model=section-name

which is rewritten to: http://www.domain.com/section99/page1/section-name

I've been able to piece together the original URL using :

function selfURL(){
    if(!isset($_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'])){
        $serverrequri = $_SERVER['PHP_SELF'];
    }else{
        $serverrequri =    $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'];
    }
    $s = empty($_SERVER["HTTPS"]) ? '' : ($_SERVER["HTTPS"] == "on") ? "s" : "";
    $protocol = "http";
    $port = ($_SERVER["SERVER_PORT"] == "80") ? "" : (":".$_SERVER["SERVER_PORT"]);
    return $protocol."://".$_SERVER['SERVER_NAME'].$port.$serverrequri.$_SERVER['QUERY_STRING'];   
}
print(selfURL());

Is there anyway I can easily pick the rewritten URL to avoid the overhead of having to work out the friendly URL from a number of different formats and variables depending on the current page type?

share|improve this question
    
Are you using ISAPI_Rewrite for IIS? – Alvaro Aug 20 '13 at 9:03
    
What are you exactly trying to do? Getting the rewritten URL for a non rewrite URL? Why? Why don't you just work with the rewritten URL all the time? – Alvaro Aug 20 '13 at 9:05
    
No. We're on IIS7 and using the built in rewrite module – Fraser Aug 20 '13 at 9:05
    
That's what I'm trying to do. Work with the rewritten URL. I am trying to grab this. My issue is that I can only get the original URL not the rewritten one – Fraser Aug 20 '13 at 9:06
    
I would recommend you to work with the mod_rewrite rules of Apache in a .htaccess file and then importing them to IIS 7. Which will generate the web.config file. – Alvaro Aug 20 '13 at 9:07

I would recommend you to work with the mod_rewrite rules of Apache in a .htaccess file and then importing them to IIS 7. Which will generate the web.config file.

Of course, if you know how to work directly on the web.config, go for it!

share|improve this answer

I can use:

HTTP_X_ORIGINAL_URL

function selfURL(){
    if(!isset($_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'])){
        $serverrequri = $_SERVER['PHP_SELF'];
    }else{
        $serverrequri =    $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'];
    }
    $protocol = empty($_SERVER["HTTPS"]) ? 'http' : ($_SERVER["HTTPS"] == "on") ? "https" : "http";
    $port = ($_SERVER["SERVER_PORT"] == "80") ? "" : (":".$_SERVER["SERVER_PORT"]);
    return $protocol."://".$_SERVER['SERVER_NAME'].$port.$_SERVER["HTTP_X_ORIGINAL_URL"];
}
print(selfURL());
share|improve this answer

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