Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I have this linked list class that does a great job on it's own functionally, however is pretty disgusting when it comes to actual memory usage (leaks, leaks everywhere).

So I'm going through implementing a basic smart pointer class into it so as to better handle memory, however I've hit a few rough points on the actual implementation part of this idea.

I've only specifically included what I think is relevant to the issue, however, if there is any parts not included that may prove useful, ask and I can post the whole thing.

main.cpp:

int main()
{
    smartLinkedList<char*> moo2;
    moo2.insertAtFront("tail");
    moo2.insertAtFront("one");
    moo2.insertAtFront("head");
    for(int j = 0; j < moo2.length() ; j++)
        cout << moo2.goToFromFront(j) << endl;

    cin.ignore(1);
    return 0;
}

smartLinkedList.h:

template <class type>
class smartLinkedList
{
private:
    int size;
    sPtr<node<type>> head; 

public:
    smartLinkedList(): head(NULL), size(0) {}
    bool insertAtFront(type obj)
    {
        sPtr<node<type>> temp(new node<type>);
        temp->data = obj;
        temp->next = head.get();
        //For future reference, &*head = head.get()
        head = temp;

        //delete temp;

        size++;
        return true;
    }
    type goToFromFront(int index)
    {
        sPtr<node<type>> temp = head;

        for(int i = 0; i < index; i++)
        {
            temp = temp->next;

            if(temp->next == NULL)
                return temp->data;
        }

        return temp->data;
    }
};

smartPointer.h:

#pragma once

class referenceCount
{
private:
    int count;
public:
    void add()
    {
        count++;
    }
    int release()
    {
        return --count;
    }
};

//for non-learning purposes, boost has a good smart pointer
template <class type>
class sPtr
{
private:
    type *p;
    referenceCount *r;
public:
    sPtr()
    {
        p = NULL;
        r = new referenceCount();
        r->add();
    }
    sPtr(type *pValue)
    {
        p = pValue;
        r = new referenceCount();
        r->add();
    }
    sPtr(const sPtr<type> & sp)
    {
        p = sp.p;
        r = sp.r;
        r->add();
    }
    ~sPtr()
    {
        if(r->release() == 0)
        {
            delete p;
            delete r;
        }
    }

    type* get()
    {
        return p;
    }

    type& operator*()
    {
        return *p;
    }
    type* operator->()
    {
        return p;
    }
    sPtr<type>& operator=(const sPtr<type>& sp)
    {
        if (this != &sp) //self assignment
        {
            /*if(r->release() == 0)
            {
                delete p;
                delete r;
            }*/ //this will cause an error when you take something with no references and set it equal to something

            p = sp.p;
            r = sp.r;
            r->add();
        }
        return *this;
    }
};

node.h:

#pragma once

template <class type>
struct node
{
    type data;
    node *next;

    node() 
    {
        next = NULL;
    }
};

The line that specifically throws "Cannot read from 0xfdfdfe01" from the if statement in the linked list's goToFromFront(int), where, at the point j = 2 in the main loop the error is thrown. Upon looking at the MSVS2010 debugger, temp->next is unknown (CXX0030: error, expression cannot be evaluated), which to me seems like it should translate to null, but the expression is throwing a cannot be read error first.

I'm not honestly sure what I've done wrong, and as this is all a learning process for me, any critique is highly appreciated. Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
You could probably make things simpler by using intrusive reference counting instead of a separate reference count; more importantly, you should use the copy-and-swap idiom for your operator= implementation. –  Medinoc Aug 20 '13 at 9:14
    
@Medinoc I was actually tempted to go ahead and rewrite the reference count before I posted this, but I figured I didn't want to accidentally add another bug in without being able to fully test it. Thanks for the copy-and-swap reference, I hadn't heard of that before, I'll implement it shortly. –  headlessgargoyle Aug 20 '13 at 9:23
    
You're not missing much code that would make this fully compile. Add reference for node and whatever else is missing and if we can fully build it ourselves we can more likely help. –  Mike Vine Aug 20 '13 at 14:06
    
@MikeVine I added node and some of my more recent changes. It should be able to compile on your end, save the obvious error that I'm here for. –  headlessgargoyle Aug 20 '13 at 18:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

These should fix your issues:

uncomment code in operator= of sPtr or use swap idiom:

sPtr<type>& operator=(const sPtr<type>& rhs)
{
    if (this != &rhs) // self assignment
    {
        sPtr<type> tmp(rhs);
        std::swap(this->p, tmp.p);
        std::swap(this->r, tmp.r);
    }
    return *this;
}

template <class T>
class node
{
public:
    T data;
    sPtr<node<T> > next;
};

bool insertAtFront(type obj)
{
    sPtr<node<type>> temp(new node<type>);
    temp->data = obj;
    temp->next = head;
    head = temp;
    size++;
    return true;
}

in goToFromFront, 'temp = temp->next;' created a refCount with one usage of temp->next. when 'temp' goes out of scope, it destroys its content, and so the 'head->next' points to garbage.

When you do sPtr > = T* , you create a temporary object implicitly you may declare as sTtr constructor as:

explicit sPtr(type *pValue)
share|improve this answer
    
I'm afraid I don't understand. The code you posted was exactly what I had except for the fifth line where I used head.get(), which must be used as head itself is a smart pointer and next is a node*. Regardless of that nuance, the part that would decrement on the = operator is commented out. Unless something else is going on at a lower level, I'm not sure where, or how, refCount would lessen. Can you explain further what you mean? (That being said, I think you're right, I do think that it points at garbage, I just don't understand how/why) –  headlessgargoyle Aug 20 '13 at 10:52
    
I uncomment the part in assign in your code (which should be present or rewritten with swap as suggested) to have the problem (with gcc in c++11). Then I fix 'insertAtFront'. The difference with the use of head.get() is the implicit call to constructor(type*) which creates a temporary object(You may forbid that implicit call by adding keyword 'explicit' before 'sPtr(type *pValue)'). That temporary has its own refcount, and is destroyed. –  Jarod42 Aug 20 '13 at 12:09
    
I think I'm starting to understand what you mean better, and I think I understand where the error is occurring, but I don't understand how to fix it. Trying to do temp->next = head would throw a type mismatch, I can only do type->next = &*head or type->next = head.get(), and I'm simply not sure how to implement explicit without having almost everything turn to error. Could you show me some code snippits or something? –  headlessgargoyle Aug 20 '13 at 20:37
    
Answer updated now we have your 'node' version. I used mine version, so my previous comment didn't apply fully to your case. –  Jarod42 Aug 20 '13 at 21:48
    
That did it perfectly and solved an issue I've been struggling for hours with. Thank you does not show enough appreciation. –  headlessgargoyle Aug 21 '13 at 6:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.