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We're trying to measure the performance between reading a series of files using sync methods vs async. Was expecting to have about the same time between the two but turns out using async is about 5.5x slower.

This might be due to the overhead of managing the threads but just wanted to know your opinion. Maybe we're just measuring the timings wrong.

These are the methods being tested:

    static void ReadAllFile(string filename)
    {
        var content = File.ReadAllBytes(filename);
    }

    static async Task ReadAllFileAsync(string filename)
    {
        using (var file = File.OpenRead(filename))
        {
            using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
            {
                byte[] buff = new byte[file.Length];
                await file.ReadAsync(buff, 0, (int)file.Length);
            }
        }
    }

And this is the method that runs them and starts the stopwatch:

    static void Test(string name, Func<string, Task> gettask, int count)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();

        Task[] tasks = new Task[count];
        sw.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            string filename = "file" + i + ".bin";
            tasks[i] = gettask(filename);
        }
        Task.WaitAll(tasks);
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(name + " {0} ms", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

    }

Which is all run from here:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int count = 10000;

        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            Write("file" + i + ".bin");
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Testing read...!");            

        Test("Read Contents", (filename) => Task.Run(() => ReadAllFile(filename)), count);
        Test("Read Contents Async", (filename) => ReadAllFileAsync(filename), count);

        Console.ReadKey();
    }

And the helper write method:

    static void Write(string filename)
    {
        Data obj = new Data()
        {
            Header = "random string size here"
        };
        int size = 1024 * 20; // 1024 * 256;

        obj.Body = new byte[size];

        for (var i = 0; i < size; i++)
        {
            obj.Body[i] = (byte)(i % 256);
        }

        Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
        sw.Start();

        MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
        Serializer.Serialize(ms, obj);
        ms.Position = 0;

        using (var file = File.Create(filename))
        {
            ms.CopyToAsync(file).Wait();
        }

        sw.Stop();
        //Console.WriteLine("Writing file {0}", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds); 
    }

The results:

-Read Contents 574 ms
-Read Contents Async 3160 ms

Will really appreciate if anyone can shed some light on this as we searched the stack and the web but can't really find a proper explanation.

share|improve this question
    
Your test might be flawed as you are spawning threads to do the reads simultaneously. A better test would be to test on thing, and then test the other. –  Kami Aug 20 '13 at 9:37
    
On a different note, there's a nifty static method on Stopwatch called StartNew, it basically does var s = new Stopwatch(); s.Start(); return s; so you don't have to. :-) –  Patrick Aug 20 '13 at 9:40
    
I think that test is flawed. Did you measure the difference between ReadAllBytes and Read? This could be a first thing, that ReadAllBytes is more efficient - perhaps it's an "atomic" operation? –  Grumbler85 Aug 20 '13 at 10:07
    
Are you testing this in release mode, without the debugger attached? Timing a debug build, or timing with the debugger attached will give unreliable results. Be sure to compile in Release mode and run with Ctrl+F5 (Run without debugging). –  Jim Mischel Aug 20 '13 at 12:54
    
Why do you have this line: using (var ms = new MemoryStream())? It doesn't look like you use ms anywhere. –  user645280 Aug 20 '13 at 15:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

There are lots of things wrong with the testing code. Most notably, your "async" test does not use async I/O; with file streams, you have to explicitly open them as asynchronous or else you're just doing synchronous operations on a background thread. Also, your file sizes are very small and can be easily cached.

I modified the test code to write out much larger files, to have comparable sync vs async code, and to make the async code asynchronous:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Write("0.bin");
    Write("1.bin");
    Write("2.bin");

    ReadAllFile("2.bin"); // warmup

    var sw = new Stopwatch();
    sw.Start();
    ReadAllFile("0.bin");
    ReadAllFile("1.bin");
    ReadAllFile("2.bin");
    sw.Stop();

    Console.WriteLine("Sync: " + sw.Elapsed);

    ReadAllFileAsync("2.bin").Wait(); // warmup

    sw.Restart();
    ReadAllFileAsync("0.bin").Wait();
    ReadAllFileAsync("1.bin").Wait();
    ReadAllFileAsync("2.bin").Wait();
    sw.Stop();

    Console.WriteLine("Async: " + sw.Elapsed);

    Console.ReadKey();
}

static void ReadAllFile(string filename)
{
    using (var file = new FileStream(filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.Read, 4096, false))
    {
        byte[] buff = new byte[file.Length];
        file.Read(buff, 0, (int)file.Length);
    }
}

static async Task ReadAllFileAsync(string filename)
{
    using (var file = new FileStream(filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.Read, 4096, true))
    {
        byte[] buff = new byte[file.Length];
        await file.ReadAsync(buff, 0, (int)file.Length);
    }
}

static void Write(string filename)
{
    int size = 1024 * 1024 * 256;
    var data = new byte[size];
    var random = new Random();
    random.NextBytes(data);
    File.WriteAllBytes(filename, data);
}

On my machine, this test (built in Release, run outside the debugger) yields these numbers:

Sync: 00:00:00.4461936
Async: 00:00:00.4429566
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing this out. I did get the about the same results on my machine which makes a lot more sense now. This is actually a test for a file cache and we're prototyping the best way to read a bunch of small files. –  gcastelo Aug 21 '13 at 10:48

It my be a better test to compare like for like if you simply want to see if asynchrnous code would help.

static void ReadFile(string filename)
{
    var content = File.ReadAllBytes(filename);
}

then run your tests like this,

static async void Main()
{
    var filenames = new List<string>(10000);
    // Populate the list and make the files here.
    ...

    // Warmup up the jitter.
    var syncTimer = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    var asyncTimer = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    ReadFile(filenames[0])
    await Task.Run(() => ReadFile(filenames[0]));

    // Do the timing
    syncTimer = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    foreach (var f in filenames)
    {
        ReadFile(f);
    }
    syncTimer.Stop();

    asyncTimer = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    await Task.WhenAll(filenames.Select(f => Task.Run(() => ReadFile(f))));
    asyncTimer.Stop();

    Console.WriteLine("Sync time: {0}ms", syncTimer.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    Console.WriteLine("Async time: {0}ms", asyncTimer.ElapsedMilliseconds);
}

This performs the same sequence of file read operations first synchronously then asynchronously.

Your code appears to compare a synchrnous sequence of file reads and a synchronous sequence of buffered asynchrnous file reads. That is a very different thing.


Below I describe the limits a asynchroncity.

Doing something asynchronously is inherently slower, you have to spawn and host the activity on a seperate thread and configure some communication mechanism to callback when the activity completes. Therefore the results of your test should be no surprise.

However, the asnychronous activity will not block the calling thread, that is the point. So the asynchronous caller is free to perform some other activity whilst the task completes.

In your case, a more interesting test would be to read multiple files. If written correctly, the asycnrounous implementation could read multiple files at once. The synchronous implementation would have to read them one after the other. Which would be faster? It depends on a number of factors:-


1 The resouces of the hosting environment.

If you're machine has free resources to perform more work then there could be benefits. In your example, file reading is unlikely to trouble a modern cpu, so its likely that an asynchronous task could utilise that spare cpu time. What about disk activity, is the file reading limited by your hard disk controller or other parts of your file system. If you're file system can handle reading multiple files at once there is a likely benefit it asynchronous activity.


2 Shared state.

If the tasks update some variable that is common between then you will have a concurrencey issue. You'll to to implement locking or control of some form around the varaible that will make the tasks queue to access the variable. This is likely to mitigate the benefits of concurrency. The art of creating effecting asynchronous code hinges on minimising these concurrency problems through good design.

In your example all your code uses static void methods so you'll have no problem.

share|improve this answer

All I/O Operation are async. The thread just waits(it gets suspended) for I/O operation to finish. That's why when read jeffrey richter he always tells to do i/o async, so that your thread is not wasted by waiting around. from Jeffery Ricter

Also creating a thread is not cheap. Each thread gets 1 mb of address space reserved for user mode and another 12kb for kernel mode. After this the OS has to notify all the dll in system that a new thread has been spawned.Same happens when you destroy a thread. Also think about the complexities of context switching

Found a great SO answer here

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