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Suppose that I have the following class:

public class IntBagWithLock
{
    private readonly lockObject = new object();
    private bool assigned = false;
    private int data1;
    private int data2;

    public int? Data1
    {
        get { lock (lockObject) { return assigned ? data1 : (int?)null; } }
    }
    public int? Data2
    {
        get { lock (lockObject) { return assigned ? data2 : (int?)null; } }
    }
    public bool Assigned { get { lock(lockObject) { return assigned; } }

    public bool TrySetData(int value1, int value2)
    {
        lock (lockObject)
        {
            if (assigned) return false;

            data1 = value1;
            data2 = value2;
            assigned = true;
            return true;
        }
    }

    public bool IsEquivalentTo(IntBagWithLock other)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(this, other)) return true;
        if (ReferenceEquals(other, null)) return false;

        lock (lockObject)
        {
            if (!assigned) return false;
            lock (other.lockObject)
            {
                return other.assigned && other.data1 == data1 && other.data2 == data2;
            }
        }
    }
}

The problem I am worried about here is that, because of the way that IsEquivalentTo is implemented, I could be left with a deadlock condition, if a thread invoked item1.IsEquivalentTo(item2) and acquired item1's lock, and another invoked item2.IsEquivalentTo(item1) and acquired item2.

What should I do to ensure, as much as possible, that such deadlocks cannot happen?

UPDATE 2: The code sample has been modified to be closer to what I actually have. I think that all answers are still valid.

share|improve this question
    
something strikes me as not right with that; can you tell us your actual use case? – Mitch Wheat Aug 20 '13 at 10:18
    
@MitchWheat: I have a class that holds two data fields (both fields are immutable values), an instance can transition from one state to another, and I would like to operate as much as possible on known states. – Jean Hominal Aug 20 '13 at 10:33
    
Can you make your IntBagWithLock to initialize only through constructor? so that you can get rid of lock – Sriram Sakthivel Aug 20 '13 at 11:36
    
@SriramSakthivel: Yes, Immutability is generally my go-to recipe for thread safety, but in this case I am pretty sure that I want the data to be modified after instantiation. – Jean Hominal Aug 20 '13 at 11:50
    
You have immutable fields that can be changed? I'm not familiar with that particular definition of immutability. – Jim Mischel Aug 20 '13 at 14:20

Normally you give an unique ID to every object, and then lock from lower id to higher id:

public class BagWithLock
{
    // The first Id generated will be 1. If you want it to be 0, put
    // here -1 .
    private static int masterId = 0; 

    private readonly object locker = new object();

    private readonly int id = Interlocked.Increment(ref masterId);

    public static void Lock(BagWithLock bwl1, BagWithLock bwl2, Action action)
    {
        if (bwl1.id == bwl2.id)
        {
            // same object case
            lock (bwl1.locker)
            {
                action();
            }
        }
        else if (bwl1.id < bwl2.id)
        {
            lock (bwl1.locker)
            {
                lock (bwl2.locker)
                {
                    action();
                }
            }
        }
        else
        {
            lock (bwl2.locker)
            {
                lock (bwl1.locker)
                {
                    action();
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

You use it like:

bool equals;

BagWithLock(bag1, bag2, () => {
    equals = bag1.SequenceEquals(bag2);
});

so you pass an Action containing what you want to do inside the locks.

The Interlocked.Increment on a static masterId guarantees an unique id to each class. Note that there will be problem if you create more than 4 billion instances of this class. If you need to do it, use long.

share|improve this answer
    
even if it wraps around you can still order; the chances of comparing two equal numbers is incredibly small (but at the same time: real) – Marc Gravell Aug 21 '13 at 8:07
    
@MarcGravell The classical bugs that you could search for days without finding it :-) At least I would put a check like: if (bwl1.id == bwl2.id) { if (!object.ReferenceEquals) { throw Exception("Equal ID!"); } – xanatos Aug 21 '13 at 8:10

Since OP mentioned data is Immutable, I think no need of locks at all here, `volatile' should do the trick.

public class BagWithLock
{
    private volatile object data;
    public object Data
    {
        get { lock return data; }
        set { data = value;  }
    }
    public bool IsEquivalentTo(BagWithLock other)
    {
        return object.Equals(data, other.data);
    }
}

This should be threadsafe. if am wrong pls correct me.

share|improve this answer
    
I have updated the question so as to better explain why I want to lock - that is, I have a bit of a more complex logic inside of the getter, that checks another field. – Jean Hominal Aug 20 '13 at 11:33

i donno why you lock every time you do get or equal, but you can do:

public bool IsEquivalentTo(BagWithLock other)
{
    object myData;
    object otherData;
    lock (lockObject)
        myData = data;

    lock (other.lockObject)
        otherData = other.data;

    return object.Equals(myData, otherData);
}

that way the items won't change while they are compared.

in general, this kind of locks has some drawbacks, and i think that i would have done a general static lockObject so you could only has on object at a time in a method that could be a race condition


UPDATE according to your update i'll say you should use:

private static readonly object equalLock = new object();

public bool IsEquivalentTo(IntBagWithLock other)
{
    lock(equalLock){
       if (ReferenceEquals(this, other)) return true;
       if (ReferenceEquals(other, null)) return false;
         if (!assigned) return false;
           return other.assigned && other.data1 == data1 && other.data2 == data2;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You should copy the object (assuming it's at all possible), not the reference to it. Otherwise, it won't prevent the objects being modified during the comparison. – Medinoc Aug 20 '13 at 10:21
    
@Medinoc of course, it would have been helpful if we know what object is it... – No Idea For Name Aug 20 '13 at 10:24
    
The objects that I put in as data are immutable. (They are even built-in value types, but who cares). – Jean Hominal Aug 20 '13 at 10:26
    
@JeanHominal because i can take that object using the get, hold it, and change it whenever i want without the locks to take stopping me – No Idea For Name Aug 20 '13 at 10:27
    
@NoIdeaForName: Yes, I know why it is important to know that the objects are immutable. The "who cares" bit was about them being built-in value types. – Jean Hominal Aug 20 '13 at 10:30

Maybe you could use the more costly, WaitHandle-derived locking objects (such as Mutex), and use WaitHandle.WaitAll() when you want several locks at once?

share|improve this answer
    
Using WaitHandle.WaitAll to acquire multiple locks can lead to deadlock. It's possible for two threads to wait on the same set of locks. Each thread gets one of the locks and keeps waiting on the other . . . It gets messy quick. – Jim Mischel Aug 20 '13 at 14:11
    
I thought WaitAll (and the underlying Win32 function, WaitForMultipleObjects) was specifically capable of handling this case by "atomically" acquiring or releasing all locks, like semop in nx... – Medinoc Aug 20 '13 at 14:16
1  
You're right. WaitForMultipleObjects will wait for the mutex to be available, but won't acquire it until they're all available. My mistake. – Jim Mischel Aug 20 '13 at 15:00

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