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I am a newbie to vert.x. I was trying out the vert.x "NetServer" capability. http://vertx.io/core_manual_java.html#writing-tcp-servers-and-clients and it works like a charm .

However , I also read that "A verticle instance is strictly single threaded.

If you create a simple TCP server and deploy a single instance of it then all the handlers for that server are always executed on the same event loop (thread)."

Currently, for my implementation, I wanted to receive the TCP stream of bytes and then trigger another component. But this should not be a blocking call within the "start" method of the Verticle. So, is it a good practice, to write an executor within the start method? or does vertx automatically handle such cases.

Here is a snippet

public class TCPListener extends Verticle {

    public void start(){

        NetServer server = vertx.createNetServer();

        server.connectHandler(new Handler<NetSocket>() {
            public void handle(NetSocket sock) {
                container.logger().info("A client has connected");
                sock.dataHandler(new Handler<Buffer>() {
                    public void handle(Buffer buffer) {
                        container.logger().info("I received " + buffer.length() + " bytes of data");

                        container.logger().info("I received " + new String(buffer.getBytes()));
                        //Trigger another component here. SHould be done in a sperate thread. 
                        //The previous call should be returned . No need to wait for component response.
                    }
                });
            }
        }).listen(1234, "host");
    }
}

What should be mechanism to make this a non blocking call.

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1  
You'll probably get a quicker answer posting this question to the vert.x google group. But so long as you don't need a reply from the second module, you should be able to just send a message on the MessageBus, and ignore the response from that as well –  tim_yates Aug 20 '13 at 10:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't think this is the way to go for vert.x.

A better way would be to use the event bus properly instead of Executor. Have a worker respond to the event on the bus, do the processing, and signal the bus when it's completed.

Creating threads defeats the purpose of going with vert.x.

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The most flexible way is to create an ExecutorService and process requests with it. This brings fine-grained control over threading model of workers (fixed or variable number of threads, what work should be performed serially on a single thread, etc).

Modified sample might look like this:

public class TCPListener extends Verticle {

    private final ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10);

    public void start(){

        NetServer server = vertx.createNetServer();

        server.connectHandler(new Handler<NetSocket>() {
            public void handle(final NetSocket sock) { // <-- Note 'final' here
                container.logger().info("A client has connected");
                sock.dataHandler(new Handler<Buffer>() {
                    public void handle(final Buffer buffer) { // <-- Note 'final' here

                        //Trigger another component here. SHould be done in a sperate thread. 
                        //The previous call should be returned . No need to wait for component response.
                        executor.submit(new Runnable() {

                            public void run() {
                                //It's okay to read buffer data here
                                //and use sock.write() if necessary
                                container.logger().info("I received " + buffer.length() + " bytes of data");
                                container.logger().info("I received " + new String(buffer.getBytes()));
                            }
                        }
                    }
                });
            }
        }).listen(1234, "host");
    }
}
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1  
It sort of defeats the purpose of using vertx if your using an ExecutorService. I think message passing (ie eventbus) is a better solution. –  Adam Gent Aug 21 '13 at 11:10
    
@AdamGent: I can't agree with you here: First of all, EventBus supports only a limited set of message types. Often, it's more efficient to pre-process message on I/O thread and delegate heavy synchronous processing to separate threads without serialization overhead. Secondly, EventBus uses FixedThreadPool under the hood. Explicitly defining ExecutorService allows you to use something faster (like ring queue) if it becomes a bottleneck. Third, single EventBus is not so flexibile: it's not possible to prioritise messages, require serial processing of specific message types, etc. –  Wildfire Aug 21 '13 at 17:12
    
First I think your over confident when you have no idea what his scale is or requirements are. Secondly he cannot easily add another machine to do the work as the ExecutorService is tied to a single JVM which is exactly what Vert.x and its EventBus allows you to avoid. Finally serialization is not really an issue and is dependent on the medium your serializing too. I doubt its going to take longer to serialize than the input of the data as that is probably external. And last time I checked the EventBus supports raw bytes. With your solution he might as well use a plain servlet container. –  Adam Gent Aug 21 '13 at 18:51
    
Thanks Wildfire and Adam. I have to agree with Adam here. I am actually looking at scaling upto 1000 tps or perhaps even more. I am not sure an executorService would be the right way to go. an event bus on the other hand seems kind of right for this purpose. there are other systems as well , which are running based on other technologies. From an integration aspect, event bus perhaps provides the kind of flexibility I need. Thanks for your responses.. really appreaciate all the help –  Raveesh Sharma Sep 10 '13 at 15:53

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