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My DB has three tables. I am tracking the progress of some files (contract_id and contract_no) through a process. Certain steps in the process are assigned a status (status_id and status_name). Below are sample data.

tbl_contracts
contract_id,contract_no
1,string
2,string
3,string

tbl_searches
search_id,contract_id,contract_no,status_id,notes,initials,search_date
489,489,22000,1,string., string.,string,2013-05-13
1242,489,22000,6,string., string.,string,2013-06-13
2292,489,22000,10,string., string.,string,2013-06-14
78,78,50000,1,string. string.,MDD,2013-05-13
1098,78,50000,6,string. string.,MDD,2013-06-13
949,949,14000,1,string.,string,2013-05-13
2573,949,14000,4,string.,string,2013-08-18

tbl_status
status_id,status_name
1,string1.
2,string2.
3,string3.
4,string4.
5,string5.
6,string6.
7,string7.
8,string8.
9,string9.
10,string10.
11,string11.

Right now I want two "report" queries. The first one I have and it returns the MAX status_id for each contract.

SELECT contract_id,contract_no, MAX(status_id)
FROM tbl_searches
GROUP BY contract_id
ORDER BY contract_no ASC;

What I can't figure out is how to pull all the contracts with a Max status_id less than 5. I thought I could use the query above as a sub query but either I'm not doing it correctly or that is the wrong strategy. Below is just one example of many variations I've tried that either fail completely, return every row in tbl_searches or some other incorrect result.

SELECT contract_id,contract_no, status_id
FROM tbl_searches
WHERE status_id
=
(
SELECT MAX(status_id)
FROM tbl_searches
WHERE MAX(status_id) < 5
#GROUP BY contract_id
#ORDER BY contract_no ASC
)
;
share|improve this question
    
Is there only one possible contract_no per contract_id? Your sample data suggests there is. –  Michael Berkowski Aug 20 '13 at 11:09
    
Yes, one possible contract_no per contract_id. –  Matt Dial Aug 20 '13 at 13:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Add the keyword HAVING to your first query. It's similar to WHERE but it works with aggregate function, e.g. MAX.

SELECT contract_id,contract_no, MAX(status_id)
FROM tbl_searches
GROUP BY contract_id, contract_no
HAVING MAX(status_id) < 5
ORDER BY contract_no ASC

EDIT: Oops, added the contract_no to GROUP BY statement. Thanks MichaelBerkowski.

share|improve this answer
1  
This will be ok if contract_id and contract_no always have the same values, that is, if there is only one possible contract_no per contract_id. Otherwise, MySQL will return erratic results for contract_no since it isn't in the GROUP BY. If they are always the same (as the sample data suggests) just add contract_no to the GROUP BY. –  Michael Berkowski Aug 20 '13 at 11:06
    
Here's a fiddle: sqlfiddle.com/#!2/c223ce/2 –  Michael Berkowski Aug 20 '13 at 11:08
    
@MichaelBerkowski, you are right, thank you. I actually thought it was already in the GROUP BY statement :) –  supertopi Aug 20 '13 at 11:08

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