Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

[ThreadStatic] is defined using attribute while ThreadLocal<T> uses generic. Why different design solutions were chosen? What are the advantages and disadvantages of using generic over attributes in this case?

share|improve this question
4  
See reedcopsey.com/2009/11/12/… - I don't see what this has to do with reflection though... –  Jon Skeet Aug 20 '13 at 11:31

2 Answers 2

Something the blog post noted in the comments doesn't make explicit, but I find to be very important, is that [ThreadStatic] doesn't automatically initialize things for every thread. For example, say you have this:

[ThreadStatic]
private int Foo = 42;

The first thread that uses this will see Foo initialized to 42. But subsequent threads will not. The initializer works for the first thread only. So you end up having to write code to check if it's initialized.

ThreadLocal<T> solves that problem by letting you supply an initialization function (as Reed's blog shows) that's run before the first time the item is accessed.

In my opinion, there is no advantage to using [ThreadStatic] instead of ThreadLocal<T>.

share|improve this answer
    
Except perhaps that ThreadLocal<T> is available in .NET 4 and up, and the ThreadStatic attribute is also available in 3.5 and below. –  Jeroen Aug 25 at 11:06

ThreadStatic Initialize only on first thread, ThreadLocal Initialize for each thread. Below is the simple demonstration:

    public static ThreadLocal<int> _threadlocal =
        new ThreadLocal<int>(() =>
        {
            return Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId;
        });

    public static void Main()
    {
        new Thread(() =>
        {
            for (int x = 0; x < _threadlocal.Value; x++)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("First Thread: {0}", x);
            }
        }).Start();

        new Thread(() =>
        {
            for (int x = 0; x < _threadlocal.Value; x++)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Second Thread: {0}", x);
            }
        }).Start();

        Console.ReadKey();
    }

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.