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[ThreadStatic] is defined using attribute while ThreadLocal<T> uses generic. Why different design solutions were chosen? What are the advantages and disadvantages of using generic over attributes in this case?

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4  
See reedcopsey.com/2009/11/12/… - I don't see what this has to do with reflection though... – Jon Skeet Aug 20 '13 at 11:31
up vote 49 down vote accepted

Something the blog post noted in the comments doesn't make explicit, but I find to be very important, is that [ThreadStatic] doesn't automatically initialize things for every thread. For example, say you have this:

[ThreadStatic]
private int Foo = 42;

The first thread that uses this will see Foo initialized to 42. But subsequent threads will not. The initializer works for the first thread only. So you end up having to write code to check if it's initialized.

ThreadLocal<T> solves that problem by letting you supply an initialization function (as Reed's blog shows) that's run before the first time the item is accessed.

In my opinion, there is no advantage to using [ThreadStatic] instead of ThreadLocal<T>.

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5  
Except perhaps that ThreadLocal<T> is available in .NET 4 and up, and the ThreadStatic attribute is also available in 3.5 and below. – Jeroen Aug 25 '14 at 11:06
    
And if you're not using initializers to set the value, but are instead setting it at some later point after initialization, using [ThreadStatic] is syntactically cleaner. – Thought Apr 9 '15 at 19:42
    
[ThreadStatic] has the advantage of not having to change existing references to that field in code. – NextInLine May 20 '15 at 17:08
4  
And except that ThreadLocal<T> implements IDisposable and usually forces you to implement IDisposable as well, which forces your callers to dispose you and therefore implement IDisposable as well ... – Stefan Steinegger Jul 24 '15 at 10:36
1  
@StefanSteinegger: I would be very careful using ThreadLocal or ThreadStatic with pool threads. Those values will remain through the entire life of the pool thread, not just for the task that you assign it. That can cause you trouble in some pretty non-obvious ways. See stackoverflow.com/questions/561518/… and similar questions for more info. – Jim Mischel Jul 25 '15 at 18:02

ThreadStatic Initialize only on first thread, ThreadLocal Initialize for each thread. Below is the simple demonstration:

    public static ThreadLocal<int> _threadlocal =
        new ThreadLocal<int>(() =>
        {
            return Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId;
        });

    public static void Main()
    {
        new Thread(() =>
        {
            for (int x = 0; x < _threadlocal.Value; x++)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("First Thread: {0}", x);
            }
        }).Start();

        new Thread(() =>
        {
            for (int x = 0; x < _threadlocal.Value; x++)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Second Thread: {0}", x);
            }
        }).Start();

        Console.ReadKey();
    }

enter image description here

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Interesting example but I do get the drift. – Eniola Oct 3 '15 at 14:10

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