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My problem is that I don't know where to store data I need to access in the final callbacks for a http request. In jQuery I would just do the following

var token = $.get('/some-url', {}, someCallback);
token.oSomeObject = {data: 'some data'};

function someCallback( data, status, token ){
     token.oSomeObject.data // 'some data'
}

I use the token to store request specific data.

Now the only way I find to acheive the this in Angular is to store the data in the actual config:

var config = {
    url: '/some-url',
    method: 'GET',
    oSomeObject: { data: 'some data' }
};
$http(config).success(someCallback);

function someCallback( data, status, headers, config ){
     config.oSomeObject.data // 'some data'
}

For one this prevents you from using the short-hand calls ($http.get, $http.post) I also find it's much a much more obtrusive way when wrapping the calls in a specific service module.

Is there any other way of doing this?

Updated to clarify

I'm probably just being retarded here not understanding how to properly use the promise API, but just to be sure we're on the same page let me give you a bit more detail to the issue.

I have 2 files: 1) Controller.js 2) AjaxServices.js (all ajax calls are defined here as methods on a service).

AjaxServices.js looks like this:

app.service('AjaxService', function( $http ){
     var self = this;

     this.createUser = function( oUser, fSuccessCallback ){
          return $http.put('/api/user', {oUser: oUser})
                       .success(fSuccessCallback);
     }
}

Controller.js looks like this:

app.controller('MyController', function( $scope, AjaxServices ){
     $scope.saveUser = function( oUser ){
          var oPromise = AjaxServices.createUser( oUser, $scope.onUserSaved );

          oPromise.oUser = oUser // this is how I solve it in jQuery.ajax. The oPromise
                                 // is then sent as the token object in the onUserSaved
                                 // callback
     }
     $scope.onUserSaved = function( oStatus, status, headers, config ){
          oStatus.id // here is the id of the newly created user 
                     // which I want to now hook on to the oUser local object

     }
}

How would you achieve the same thing using the promise API?

share|improve this question
1  
You can set config in short-hand calls: $http.get(url, config). More info: docs.angularjs.org/api/ng.$http#get –  package Aug 20 '13 at 13:32
    
Simply store it in the (variable) scope? You can access the config variable from the callback function as they are declared in the same scope - just omit that parameter which would shadow the outer variable. –  Bergi Sep 11 '13 at 11:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

UPDATE 2. Some notes on your updated code: You don't have to pass the callback to the service. This effectivelly kills the purpose of the promise. Let the service to it's job without coupling it to any consumer of it's data.

app.service('AjaxService', function( $http ){
    var self = this;

    this.createUser = function( oUser ){
      return $http.put('/api/user', {oUser: oUser});
    }
}

Now the service does't care about the the callbacks, meaning you could attach multiple callbacks to same service $http call. Ok, let's move on to the service data consumer, in this case it's the controller:

app.controller('MyController', function( $scope, AjaxServices ){
  $scope.saveUser = function( oUser ){
    var oOriginalPromise = AjaxServices.createUser( oUser );
    //lets modify the orginal promise to include our oUser
    var oModifiedPromise = oOriginalPromise.then(function(response) {
      response.oUser = oUser; 
      return response;
    });
    //in the code above we've chained original promise with .then,
    //modified response object and returned it for next promise to receive
    //at the same time, .then created a new promise

    //finally, after modifying our response, we can pass it to the desired callback. 
    //note, that .success and .error are $http specific promise methods, 
    //in all other cases use .then(fnSuccess, fnError)
    oModifiedPromise.then($scope.onUserSaved); 
  }
  $scope.onUserSaved = function(responseWithUser) {
    responseWithUser.oUser;
  }
}

Of course, it is still a bit awkward, since the oUser could be saved in the controller's scope and could be accessed directly from there in $scope.onUserSaved.

UPDATE. I will clarify my answer. You can chain promises in any scope, anywhere. Here's another example with token being injected by service:

myModule.factory('Service', function($http) {
   return new function() {
      this.getData = function() {
        return $http.get(url).then(function(response) {
          response.token = myToken;
          return response;
        }
      }
   }
});

You could even extend or wrap $http service and inject tokens on responses without your services knowing about it.

If you do this with all your requests, maybe a $httpInterceptor would be more appropriate. Read more about intercepting http calls here

Original answer

Since $http provides you with promise, you can chain it to another promise which would inject token in response:

myModule.factory('Service', function($http) {
   return new function() {
      this.getData = function() {
        return $http.get(url);
      }
   }
});

//in controller or other service:
var myToken;
var tokenizedPromise = Service.getData().then(function(response) {
  response.token = myToken;
  return response;
});

The final consumer of the promise has access to the token as well

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer but correct me if I'm wrong here but issn't the only reason the callback function has access to myToken because it is defined within the parent scope? I have my services located in a different file which I then pass the callbacks ie: ajaxCall( param, successCallback ). Which means that the callback is in a different scope (js terms not angular) from where it is originally called and thus has no access to myToken. –  Hampus Ahlgren Sep 11 '13 at 11:02
    
I've updated my answer with extended clarification. –  package Sep 11 '13 at 11:15
    
Thanks for the answer. I'm still not there but I've added a bit more information if you care to give it another go. –  Hampus Ahlgren Sep 11 '13 at 15:54
    
Thanks for the update. The reason I don't store it in the scope is for the case that another one is created before the call is back. I've got some reading up on how to handle promises properly in angular. Thanks again. –  Hampus Ahlgren Sep 11 '13 at 22:55

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