Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing 2 programs, the first program has an array of integers

vector<int> v = {10, 200, 3000, 40000};

Then it converts the vector into string

int i;
stringstream sw;
string stringword;

for (i=0;i<v.size();i++) 
{
    sw << v[i] << ',';
}
stringword = sw.str();
cout << "Vector in string : "<< stringword << endl;

And then write it in a file

ofstream myfile;
myfile.open ("writtentext");
myfile << stringword;
myfile.close();

The output :

Vector in string : 10,200,3000,40000

The second program will read the file, convert the string back to integer, and then push it back to vector.

The code :

string stringword;

ifstream myfile;
myfile.open ("writtentext");
getline (myfile,stringword);
cout << "Read From File = " << stringword << endl;

cout << "Convert back to vector = " ;
for (int i=0;i<stringword.length();i++)
{
    if (stringword.find(','))
    {
        int value;
        istringstream (stringword) >> value;
        v.push_back(value);
        stringword.erase(0, stringword.find(','));
    }
}
for (int j=0;j<v.size();j++) 
{
    cout << v.at(j) << " " ;
}

The problem is, it can only convert and push back the first element, the rest is erased. Here is the output :

Read From File = 10,200,3000,40000,
Convert back to vector = 10

What did I do wrong? Thanks

share|improve this question
    
skip the string part and just write the vector to a file. –  andre Aug 20 '13 at 13:12
1  
Check what stringword.find(',') returns (en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/string/basic_string/find). If that doesn't make it obvious, run the code through a debugger and you'll see. And while you are at it, check also the documentation for erase: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/string/basic_string/erase. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 20 '13 at 13:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There's problem with your for loop

Consider this:

while(1) //Use a while loop, "i" isn't doing anything for you
{
    //if comman not found find return string::npos

    if (stringword.find(',')!=std::string::npos)
    {
        int value;
        istringstream (stringword) >> value;

        v.push_back(value);

       //Erase all element including comma
        stringword.erase(0, stringword.find(',')+1);
    }
    else 
       break; //Come out of loop
}

Instead, just use std::stringstream to read back from file

std::stringstream ss(stringword);
int value;
while (ss >> value)
{
    v.push_back(value);

    if (ss.peek() == ',')
        ss.ignore();
}

for (int j=0;j<v.size();j++)  //Fix variables
{
    cout << v.at(j) << " " ; // Can use simply v[j]
}
share|improve this answer
for (int j=0;j<v.size();i++) 
{
    cout << v.at(i) << " " ;
}

should be

for (int j=0;j<v.size();j++) 
{
    cout << v.at(j) << " " ;
}

i is not declared in the for loop

share|improve this answer
    
Correct, but this is not the issue –  P0W Aug 20 '13 at 13:17

You can skip the string conversion. All stream can handle int types.

std::vector<int> to output:

#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <vector>

int main() {
    std::vector<int> v;
    v.push_back(1);
    v.push_back(2);
    v.push_back(3);
    v.push_back(4);
    std::ostream_iterator<int> output_iterator(std::cout, ",");
    std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), output_iterator);
}

input to std::vector<int>:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <sstream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    std::vector<int> v;
    int value;

    std::string line;
    while(getline(cin, line, ',')) {
        std::stringstream ss(line);
        ss >> value
        v.push_back(value);
    }
    typedef std::vector<int>::iterator iter;
    iter end = v.end();
    for(iter it = v.begin(); it != end; ++it) {
        std::cout << *it << endl;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

this is only a mistake you did:

for (int j=0;j<v.size();i++) 
{
    cout << v.at(i) << " " ;
}

but the implement is too inefficient here:

for (int i=0;i<stringword.length();i++)
{
    if (stringword.find(','))
    {
        int value;
        istringstream (stringword) >> value;
        v.push_back(value);
        stringword.erase(0, stringword.find(','));
    }
}

you may do like this, just a suggestion:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <stdlib.h>

int ConvertStringToInt(const std::string &str, std::vector<int> &ints)
{
    int count_int = 0;
    std::string string_int;

    size_t start = 0;
    size_t end   = 0;

    while ((end = str.find(',', start)) != std::string::npos)
    {
        string_int.assign(str, start, end - start);
        ints.push_back(atoi(string_int.c_str()));
        start = end + 1;
        ++count_int;
    }
    if (start != str.size())
    {
        ints.push_back(atoi(str.c_str() + start));
        ++count_int;
    }
    return count_int;
}

int main(int argc, char *const argv[]) 
{
    std::vector<int> ints;
    std::string str = "123,456,789 ";
    std::cout << ConvertStringToInt(str, ints) << std::endl;
    for (size_t i = 0; i != ints.size(); ++i)
    {
        std::cout << ints[i] << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

You can make your programs simpler:

#include <algorithm>
#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <vector>

// output
int main()
{
    // my compiler doesn't support initializer lists yet :(
    std::vector<int> v(4);
    v[0] = 10;
    v[1] = 200;
    v[2] = 3000;
    v[3] = 40000;

    std::ofstream fout("mytestfile.txt");
    std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(fout, ","));
    fout.close();
    return 0;
}

// input
struct int_reader : std::ctype<char>
{
    int_reader() : std::ctype<char>(get_table()) {}

    static std::ctype_base::mask const* get_table()
    {
        static std::vector<std::ctype_base::mask> rc(table_size, std::ctype_base::mask());
        rc[','] = std::ctype_base::space;
        rc['\n'] = std::ctype_base::space;
        return &rc[0];
    }
};

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> v;
    std::ifstream fin("mytestfile.txt", std::ifstream::in);
    fin.imbue(std::locale(std::locale(), new int_reader()));
    std::copy(std::istream_iterator<int>(fin), std::istream_iterator<int>(), std::back_inserter<std::vector<int>>(v));
    fin.close();

    std::cout << "You read in:  ";
    std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.