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How do I constantly get user input (strings) until enter is pressed in C just like string class in C++?

I don't know the input size so I can't declare a variable of fixed size or even I can't allocate memory dynamically using malloc() or calloc().

Is there any way to implement this as a separate function?

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4  
while ((c = fgetc(stdin)) != EOF), and realloc() exponentially. –  user529758 Aug 20 '13 at 13:27
1  
@zaibis First, you did write "as you are on windows OS". Then you have corrected "as" to "if" after my comment. Don't pretend you didn't make a mistake whereas you did. –  user529758 Aug 20 '13 at 13:40
1  
You can also use a linked list of buffer! –  Grijesh Chauhan Aug 20 '13 at 13:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use exponential storage expansion:

char *read_a_line(void)
{
    size_t alloc_size = LINE_MAX;
    size_t len = 0;

    char *buf = malloc(LINE_MAX); // should be good for most, euh, *lines*...
    if (!buf)
       abort();

    int c;
    while ((c = fgetc(stdin)) != '\n' && c != EOF) {
        if (len >= alloc_size) {
            alloc_size <<= 1;
            char *tmp = realloc(buf, alloc_size);
            if (!tmp)
                abort(); // or whatever

            buf = tmp;
        }

        buf[len++] = c;
    }

    if (len >= alloc_size) {
        alloc_size++;
        char *tmp = realloc(buf, alloc_size);
        if (!tmp)
            abort(); // or whatever

        buf = tmp;
    }

    buf[len] = 0;
    return buf;
}
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Just a comment on style: You might want to avoid code duplication. –  thejh Aug 20 '13 at 13:56
    
@thejh Sure. But no way I'm writing a separate 4-line extend_buffer() function in a SO answer. I'm doing that in real life, though, when there's stuff needed to be done along with reallocation. –  user529758 Aug 20 '13 at 13:57
    
Have a look at my answer – you just need to change the first len >= alloc_size to len >= alloc_size-1 and you can drop the second block for extending the buffer. –  thejh Aug 20 '13 at 14:04

In C, you have little choice: If you want to input a string of unbounded length, have to use allocations in a loop. Whether you use realloc() or a linked list of buffers, it comes down to reading (usually through fgets()), reading some more, and so on until the buffer you've just read contains a \n.

Then, depending on the method, you either already have a contiguous buffer (the realloc method) or just need to concatenate them all (the linked list method). Then you can return.

If you're lucky, your platform comes with the extension function getline() that does the realloc method for you. If not, you'll have to write it yourself.

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As H2CO3 said, you should allocate a buffer with malloc(), then resize it with realloc() whenever it fills up. Like this:

size_t bufsize = 256;
size_t buf_used = 0;
int c;
char *buf = malloc(bufsize);
if (buf == NULL) { /* error handling here */ }
while ((c = fgetc(stdin)) != EOF) {
  if (c == '\n') break;
  if (buf_used == bufsize-1) {
    bufsize *= 2;
    buf = realloc(buf, bufsize);
    if (buf == NULL) { /* error handling here */ }
  }
  buf[buf_used++] = c;
}
buf[buf_used] = '\0';
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1  
Explaination for the downvote, please? –  thejh Aug 20 '13 at 14:06

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