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I'm trying to estimate the size in memory of a vector of a vector, but it seems I don't get the correct approximation.

Here is the small code I wrote to check :

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
        size_t n = 100;
        size_t m = 1000000;

        float sizeInKB = (sizeof(vector<vector<int> >) + n*sizeof(vector<int>) + n*m*sizeof(int))/1024.0f;
        cout << sizeInKB << " KB" << endl;

        vector<vector<int> > vect(n);

        for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
        {
                vect[i].resize(m);
        }

        while(true)
        {}

        return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

As output, I get 390 630 KB, whereas the application takes 394 588 KB in memory according to the task manager. I agree that this is not the best way to know how much memory is used by the application (and especially by the vector) but it gives a good hint, and 4 MB is not only a few KB.

Now if I try to estimate the size in memory of a vector of vector of vector, it gets more and more messy. With the same code, replacing int by vector<int> :

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
        size_t n = 100;
        size_t m = 1000000;

        float sizeInKB = (sizeof(vector<vector<vector<int> > >) + n*sizeof(vector<vector<int> >) + n*m*sizeof(vector<int>))/1024.0f;
        cout << sizeInKB << " KB" << endl;

        vector<vector<vector<int> > > vect(n);

        for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
        {
                vect[i].resize(m);
        }

        while(true)
        {}

        return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

As output I get 4 687 500 KB, whereas the application takes 6 271 028 KB in memory according to the task manager. There is a difference of more than 1.5 GB ... Where is this overhead coming from ? Is there a way to compute it ?

I'm running all of this on Windows 7 Pro 64 bits, with Visual Studio 2008 ...

Thanks in advance,

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5  
Remember that the operating system needs space for its housekeeping as well, page tables, memory maps, stacks, etc. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 20 '13 at 13:33
    
And even more so in a Debug build, you should compare the Debug and Release results. –  Medinoc Aug 20 '13 at 13:40
    
Looks like you're missing the size of the integer storage in the second code. –  tinman Aug 20 '13 at 13:42
    
@tinman: But each of the inner vector (3rd dimension) contains zero elements. –  Mats Petersson Aug 20 '13 at 13:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In your second case, every single of your n * m elements is a vector<int>, which has to be dynamically allocated. Each such dynamic allocation has an overhead. It is not unusual to find dynamic allocations having a 32-64 byte overhead. This is highly likely part of the reason for your "missing" bytes.

share|improve this answer
    
But even in the first case, if I take size_t m = 50000000 the expected size is 19.531 GB and the memory used is 19.572 GB ... Housekeeping of the operating system then ? –  Ben B. Aug 20 '13 at 13:49
    
In the first case, you have 100 vectors of m vectors of int. There is only 100 vector overheads for this, each containing 1M integers. In the second case, you have 100M vectors of int, which each has it's own storage for int. Without knowing how the internal representation of vector<int> is defined, we can't say how much memory each allocation takes, but it's a fair estimate to say that there will be some overhead. –  Mats Petersson Aug 20 '13 at 13:54
    
Could it be possible that the overhead depends on the size of the allocated vector (cf first case, with m = 50M) ? –  Ben B. Aug 20 '13 at 14:08
1  
Note that 50M means 200MB per allocation, so the overhead would be very small in this case. The overhead consists of two things: the admin block that new/delete or malloc/free uses to keep track of "what was allocated", and a rounding up of the block size to some alignment size, typically 8 or 16 bytes. So for an allocation of 200MB, the percentage overhead is minute. In the case of a small allocation, the percentage overhead is much larger. In your second case, you have LOTS of little allocation. –  Mats Petersson Aug 20 '13 at 15:32
    
It seems the overhead is about 16 bytes per vector indeed (1.6 "missing" GB / 100 M vectors ~= 16 B per vector) ... But I guess this is implementation-based, and is most likely to be different on each system –  Ben B. Aug 21 '13 at 7:39

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