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In my classes I implement IDisposable as follows:

public class User : IDisposable
{
    public int id { get; protected set; }
    public string name { get; protected set; }
    public string pass { get; protected set; }

    public User(int UserID)
    {
        id = UserID;
    }
    public User(string Username, string Password)
    {
        name = Username;
        pass = Password;
    }

    // Other functions go here...

    public void Dispose()
    {
        // Clear all property values that maybe have been set
        // when the class was instantiated
        id = 0;
        name = String.Empty;
        pass = String.Empty;
    }
}

In VS2012, my Code Analysis says to implement IDisposable correctly, but I'm not sure what I've done wrong here.
The exact text is as follows:

CA1063 Implement IDisposable correctly Provide an overridable implementation of Dispose(bool) on 'User' or mark the type as sealed. A call to Dispose(false) should only clean up native resources. A call to Dispose(true) should clean up both managed and native resources. stman User.cs 10

For reference: CA1063: Implement IDisposable correctly

I've read through this page, but I'm afraid I don't really understand what needs to be done here.

If anyone can explain in more lamens terms what the problem is and/or how IDisposable should be implemented, that will really help!

Thanks in advance.

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1  
Is that all the code inside Dispose? –  Claudio Redi Aug 20 '13 at 13:54
1  
There is the IDisposable pattern that you should use / investigate. I am sure you will get lots of answers with details soon but basically it involves GC.SupressFinalize() and destructor etc. –  Belogix Aug 20 '13 at 13:54
19  
You should implement your Dispose() method to call the Dispose() method on any of the members of your class. None of those members have one. You should therefore not implement IDisposable. Resetting the property values is pointless. –  Hans Passant Aug 20 '13 at 13:56
6  
You only need to implement IDispoable if you have unmanaged resources to dispose of (this includes unmanaged resources that are wrapped (SqlConnection, FileStream, etc.). You do not and should not implement IDisposable if you only have managed resources such as here. This is, IMO, a major problem with code analysis. It's very good at checking silly little rules, but not good at checking conceptual errors. –  Jason Aug 20 '13 at 13:59
2  
It's quite upsetting to me that some people would rather downvote and see this question closed than attempt to help a person who clearly has misunderstood a concept. What a shame. –  Ortund Aug 20 '13 at 14:29

8 Answers 8

This would be the correct implementation, although I don't see anything you need to dispose in the code you posted. You only need to implement IDisposable when:

  1. You have unmanaged resources
  2. You're holding on to references of things that are themselves disposable.

Nothing in the code you posted needs to be disposed.

public class User : IDisposable
{
    public int id { get; protected set; }
    public string name { get; protected set; }
    public string pass { get; protected set; }

    public User(int UserID)
    {
        id = UserID;
    }
    public User(string Username, string Password)
    {
        name = Username;
        pass = Password;
    }

    // Other functions go here...

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    public virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (disposing) 
        {
            // free managed resources
        }
    // free native resources if there are any.

}
share|improve this answer
    
I was told when I started writing in C# that it's best to make use of using(){ } whenever possible, but to do that, you need to implement IDisposable, so in general, I prefer to access a class through usings, esp. if I only need the class in one or two functions –  Ortund Aug 20 '13 at 14:05
21  
@Ortund You misunderstood. It's best to use a using block when the class implements IDisposable. If you don't need a class to be disposable, don't implement it. It serves no purpose. –  Daniel Mann Aug 20 '13 at 14:16
    
@DanielMann The semantics of a using block do tend to be appealing beyond the IDisposable interface alone, though. I imagine there have been more than a few abuses of IDisposable just for scoping purposes. –  Thomas Nov 14 at 5:35

First of all, you don't need to "clean up" strings and ints - they will be taken care of automatically by the garbage collector. The only thing that needs to be cleaned up in Dispose are unmanaged resources or managed recources that implement IDisposable.

However, assuming this is just a learning exercise, the recommended way to implement IDisposable is to add a "safety catch" to ensure that any resources aren't disposed of twice:

public void Dispose()
{
    Dispose(true);

    // Use SupressFinalize in case a subclass 
    // of this type implements a finalizer.
    GC.SuppressFinalize(this);   
}
protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
{
    if (!_disposed)
    {
        if (disposing) 
        {
            // Clear all property values that maybe have been set
            // when the class was instantiated
            id = 0;
            name = String.Empty;
            pass = String.Empty;
        }

        // Indicate that the instance has been disposed.
        _disposed = true;   
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, having a flag to make sure the cleanup code is executed only once is way, way better than setting properties to null or whatever (especially since that interferes with readonly semantics) –  Thomas Nov 14 at 5:37

IDisposable exists to provide a means for you to clean up unmanaged resources that won't be cleaned up automatically by the Garbage Collector.

All of the resources that you are "cleaning up" are managed resources, and as such your Dispose method is accomplishing nothing. Your class shouldn't implement IDisposable at all. The Garbage Collector will take care of all of those fields just fine on its own.

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1  
Agree with this - there is a notion of disposing everything when it is actually not needed. Dispose should be used only if you have unmanaged resources to clean up!! –  Chandramouleswaran Ravichandra Mar 25 at 16:25

You need to use the Disposable Pattern like this:

private bool _disposed = false;

protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
{
    if (!_disposed)
    {
        if (disposing)
        {
            // Dispose any managed objects
            // ...
        }

        // Now disposed of any unmanaged objects
        // ...

        _disposed = true;
    }
}

public void Dispose()
{
    Dispose(true);
    GC.SuppressFinalize(this);  
}

// Destructor
~YourClassName()
{
    Dispose(false);
}
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You have no need to do your User class being IDisposable since the class doesn't acquire any non-managed resources (file, database connection, etc.). Usually, we mark classes as IDisposable if they have at least one IDisposable field or/and property. When implementing IDisposable, better put it according Microsoft typical scheme:

public class User: IDisposable {
  ...
  protected virtual void Dispose(Boolean disposing) {
    if (disposing) {
      // There's no need to set zero empty values to fields 
      // id = 0;
      // name = String.Empty;
      // pass = String.Empty;

      //TODO: free your true resources here (usually IDisposable fields)
    }
  }

  public void Dispose() {
    Dispose(true);

    GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
  } 
}
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Idisposable is implement whenever you want a deterministic (confirmed) garbage collection.

class Users : IDisposable
    {
        ~Users()
        {
            Dispose(false);
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            Dispose(true);
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
            // This method will remove current object from garbage collector's queue 
            // and stop calling finilize method twice 
        }    

        public void Dispose(bool disposer)
        {
            if (disposer)
            {
                // dispose the managed objects
            }
            // dispose the unmanaged objects
        }
    }

When creating and using the Users class use "using" block to avoid explicitly calling dispose method:

using (Users _user = new Users())
            {
                // do user related work
            }

end of the using block created Users object will be disposed by implicit invoke of dispose method.

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http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms244737.aspx

public class Resource : IDisposable {

private IntPtr nativeResource = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(100);
private AnotherResource managedResource = new AnotherResource();

// Dispose() calls Dispose(true)

public void Dispose()
{
    Dispose(true);
    GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
}

// NOTE: Leave out the finalizer altogether if this class doesn't own unmanaged resources itself, but leave the other methods exactly as they are. // Finalizer calls Dispose(false)

~Resource() 
{
Dispose(false);
}

// The bulk of the clean-up code is implemented in Dispose(bool)

protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing) { if (disposing) {

        if (managedResource != null)
        {
            managedResource.Dispose();
            managedResource = null;
        }
    }

    if (nativeResource != IntPtr.Zero) 
    {
        Marshal.FreeHGlobal(nativeResource);
        nativeResource = IntPtr.Zero;
    }
}

}

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Just add a new version of dispose:

public virtual void Dispose(bool disposeManagedResourced)

Or, as an alternative, you could mark the class as sealed:

public sealed class User : IDisposable

which means that it can't be inherited.

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