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I was wondering if it is possible to print all lines in a file using AWK and then selecting one of those columns in the file to hash that value using this command:

openssl dgst -sha1 | sed 's/^.* //'

I am using the read command at the moment but it seems to write extremely slow. Here's what I have at the moment:

while IFS="," read -ra line;
do
    if [ "${line[1]}" != "" ]; then
        echo -n "${line[*]}, Hash Value:"; echo "${line[1]}" | openssl dgst -sha1 | sed 's/^.* //'
    else
        if [ "${line[1]}" == "" ]; then
            echo "${line[*]}, Hash Value: None";
        fi
    fi
done

So I guess ultimately what I am saying is, how can I use AWK instead to print all the line and do a command on a specific column? Looking to speed up the process of the read. Also, is it possible to use AWK to print columns of all files in a directory?

Thanks guys!

UPDATE

Below is code containing the conversion to DOS to UNIX format of all text files. Below that is some of the output to unix.txt. Lastly, below that is my script.

dos2unix

$ dos2unix *.txt
dos2unix: converting file unix.txt to Unix format ...
dos2unix: converting file woohoo.txt to Unix format ...

unix.txt Input

7051,95230163,-1,53200703
7051,95230163,-1,53200703
7051,95230163,-1,53200703
53200703,2286,Mon Jul 01 13:30:03 PDT 2013
53200703,2286,Mon Jul 01 13:30:03 PDT 2013
53200703,2286,Mon Jul 01 13:30:03 PDT 2013

unix.txt Output

$ ./trial.sh < unix.txt
7051,95230163,-1,53200703, Hash Value: c9b674deec9973f4d0feb83433d6db0b4ea5012a
7051,95230163,-1,53200703, Hash Value:
7051,95230163,-1,53200703, Hash Value:
53200703,2286,Mon Jul 01 13:30:03 PDT 2013, Hash Value: 2a8db89cc6f4ccdc0ce423011e869cb8b29b1003
53200703,2286,Mon Jul 01 13:30:03 PDT 2013, Hash Value:
53200703,2286,Mon Jul 01 13:30:03 PDT 2013, Hash Value:

Script

gawk -F',' '
function hash(val, var) 
    {
    if (val == "") { 
           var = "None" 
          }
              else {
                    "echo \"" val "\" | openssl dgst -sha1" | getline var
                   sub(/.* /,"",var) 
                    }
              return var 
                    }
{ printf "%s, Hash Value: %s\n", $0, hash($2) } '

As you can see when the script is ran against unix.txt, the values that contain a second column are not hashing. The first few rows are hashing though. Not sure what is happening but it should work.

share|improve this question
    
How slow is "extremely slow"? –  Vaughn Cato Aug 20 '13 at 14:18
    
@Vaughn Well, I have multiple files that need to be processed and one file is 255MB. That one file probably takes 3-4 hours on my machine. I would like to eventually only take 15-20 minutes to complete a file of that size. –  Beardy Aug 20 '13 at 14:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
$ cat input.txt         
7051,95230163,-1,53200703
7051,95230163,-1,53200703
7051,95230163,-1,53200703
53200703,2286,Mon Jul 01 13:30:03 PDT 2013
53200703,2286,Mon Jul 01 13:30:03 PDT 2013
53200703,2286,Mon Jul 01 13:30:03 PDT 2013
$                       
$ cat trial.sh
gawk -F',' '
function hash(val, var) {
    if (val == "") { 
        var = "None" 
    }
    else {
        cmd = "echo \"" val "\" | openssl dgst -sha1"
        cmd | getline var
        close(cmd)
        sub(/.* /,"",var) 
    }
    return var 
}
{ printf "%s, Hash Value: %s\n", $0, hash($2) }
'
$ 
$ ./trial.sh < input.txt
7051,95230163,-1,53200703, Hash Value: c9b674deec9973f4d0feb83433d6db0b4ea5012a
7051,95230163,-1,53200703, Hash Value: c9b674deec9973f4d0feb83433d6db0b4ea5012a
7051,95230163,-1,53200703, Hash Value: c9b674deec9973f4d0feb83433d6db0b4ea5012a
53200703,2286,Mon Jul 01 13:30:03 PDT 2013, Hash Value: 2a8db89cc6f4ccdc0ce423011e869cb8b29b1003
53200703,2286,Mon Jul 01 13:30:03 PDT 2013, Hash Value: 2a8db89cc6f4ccdc0ce423011e869cb8b29b1003
53200703,2286,Mon Jul 01 13:30:03 PDT 2013, Hash Value: 2a8db89cc6f4ccdc0ce423011e869cb8b29b1003

Note that above is GNU-awk specific as it uses coprocesses to pipe the output of the shell command into being read by getline.

Also, now that I see your sample input contains many duplicates, this would probably be more efficient by avoiding the external command and pipes for duplicate key fields by just storing the hash value the first time it's calculated and using it thereafter:

$ cat trial.sh               
gawk -F',' '
function hash(val) {
    if ( !(val in map) ) {
        if (val == "") { 
            map[val] = "None" 
        }
        else {
            cmd = "echo \"" val "\" | openssl dgst -sha1"
            cmd | getline map[val]
            close(cmd)
            sub(/.* /,"",map[val])
        }
    }
    return map[val]
}
{ printf "%s, Hash Value: %s\n", $0, hash($2) }
'

And yes, of course you can use awk to print whatever you want from all files in a directory:

awk '{ print <whatever> }' /dir/*
share|improve this answer
    
This seems to be the closest to what I have been looking to do in a quick manner as of yet. Only issue is that it's not printing the values after the "Hash Value:" part after the first line. Going to see if I can figure out why. –  Beardy Aug 20 '13 at 17:28
    
If you copy/paste your command and it's output into the original question you asked, we can tell you what the problem is. Also run gawk --version. –  Ed Morton Aug 20 '13 at 18:28
    
I just noticed you said "...after the first line" so that tells me there's something wrong with your input file since the awk script won't behave differently between lines. Probably your input file was created on Windows and so has spurious control-Ms at the end of each line. Run cat -v on it to check and dos2unix to fix it. –  Ed Morton Aug 21 '13 at 12:27
1  
Beautiful, works like a charm. Thanks so much for the help. I'll make sure to +1 when I have enough reps. Thanks again for all your help. –  Beardy Aug 21 '13 at 14:20
1  
The update is even faster than the original. Thanks so much! –  Beardy Aug 21 '13 at 14:28

It its possible to run a shell command from awk. You just need proper quoting, like this:

echo "123" | awk '{ print $0 | "openssl dgst -sha1 | sed '"'s/^.* //'"'" }'

output:

a8fdc205a9f19cc1c7507a60c4f01b13d11d7fd0
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help, but used another example for what I need to do. –  Beardy Aug 21 '13 at 14:40

Normally, you'd do something like:

cat file
awk '{print $2}' file | openssl dgst -sha1 | sed 's/^.* //'

This uses cat to copy all lines in the file to standard output, and then uses awk to print the values in column 2, which is piped to openssl and sed. Is there a reason you can't do that?

If the input is coming from a command (so you can't reread it), you have to work harder, but you explicitly say 'from a file' so I assume this isn't a problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your input, used another example though. –  Beardy Aug 21 '13 at 14:41
    
If you want a hash value for each line, then what I gave isn't what you need — but what I gave is one reasonable interpretation of "print all lines in a file using AWK and then selecting one of those columns in the file to hash that value". I suppose 'that value' vs 'those values' might be the clue I missed. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 21 '13 at 14:52

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