Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new to programming and am playing around with Python scripting.

I'm trying to write a Python script that will read a text file and print to screen, search for a word, and every time it finds the word, to split the data of that line.

The test.txt file looks something like:

ape bear cat dog ape elephant frog giraffe ape horse iguana jaguar

I want the end result on screen to look like:

ape bear cat dog
ape elephant frog giraffe
ape horse iguana jaguar

My code so far:

file = "test.txt"
read_file = open(file, "r")
with read_file as data:
    read_file.read()
    print(data)
    word = "ape"
    for word in data:
        data.split()
        print(data)

I made the file a variable because I intend to use it many different times in the script.

When I tested the code, the for loop didn't stop after one loop. It eventually ended, but I'm sure if it was the code or program automatically ends infinite loops.

How do I edit the code so that the for loop will stop once it reaches the end of the file? And is there a more correct way to write this code?

Again, this is just an example file, not my actual file. Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
I see many mistakes in your example: 1. read_file.read() reads and return the whole content of the file but you are doing nothing with it. 2. You assigned word = "ape", but I don't see an use for it. You are not using this value and it's going to be replaced by the for in the next line if there's any data. 3. data.split() return a list of words separated by spaces (doesn't work in place), but you are doing nothing with it. –  KurzedMetal Aug 20 '13 at 14:41

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted
fileName = "test.txt"
read_file = open(fileName, "r")
with read_file as open_file:
    data = open_file.read().rstrip()
    keyword = "ape"
    data = ' '.join(["\n"*(word == keyword) + word for word in data.split()]).strip()
#   data = data.replace(keyword, "\n"+keyword).strip()
    print(data)

OUTPUT:

# ape bear cat dog 
# ape elephant frog giraffe 
# ape horse iguana jaguar
share|improve this answer
1  
Need to be careful if grape appears for instance... –  Jon Clements Aug 20 '13 at 15:03
    
@JonClements Good point - changed implementation to account for that (kept old implementation as a comment). –  Brionius Aug 20 '13 at 15:18
>>> f = open("test.txt")
>>> a = f.read()
>>> f.close()
>>> a = a.replace("ape", "\nape")
>>> print(a)

ape bear cat dog
ape elephant frog giraffe
ape horse iguana jaguar
share|improve this answer
    
This works well, except at the end of each line I get a "\". Is there a way to avoid that? Thanks! –  hjames Aug 20 '13 at 14:31

Try this, it does exactly what you intend:

file = "test.txt"
word = 'ape'
read_file = open(file, "r")
with read_file as data:
    for line in data:
        sp = line.split(word)
        for s in sp:
            if s:
                print(word + s)
share|improve this answer

The test.txt file looks something like:

ape bear cat dog ape elephant frog giraffe ape horse iguana jaguar

I want the end result on screen to look like:

ape bear cat dog
ape elephant frog giraffe
ape horse iguana jaguar

So you want every occurrence of 'ape' to be at the start of a line.

My code so far:

file = "test.txt"
read_file = open(file, "r")
with read_file as data:

There is no point in splitting these two up. If with is done with the file, it is closed and has to be open()ed again.

So just do

with open(file, "r") as data:

BTW, in your code, read_file and data are the same.

    read_file.read()

So you read the whole file into memory and discard the result.

    print(data)

Print the file object.

    word = "ape"

Assigns...

    for word in data:

... and immediately discards it again.

        data.split()

Splits the data and discards the result.

        print(data)

Prints the file object again.

But, as you have read the whole file, the for loop probably didn't run at all.

Improvements:

filename = "test.txt" # file is a builtin function
hotword = "ape"
with open(filename, "r") as read_file:
    for line in read_file:
        parts = line.split(hotword)
        if not parts[0]: # starts with the hotword, so 1st part is empty
            del parts[0]
        print ("\n" + ape).join(parts)

I made the file a variable because I intend to use it many different times in the script.

For the name it is ok, but the open file cannot be recycled, as with closes it.

When I tested the code, the for loop didn't stop after one loop.

Sure? What did it print?

share|improve this answer
    
It printed out the text.txt file and then the correct end result - but it repeated that cycle many times –  hjames Aug 20 '13 at 14:55

Assuming that you're trying to learn about control flow and are not trying anything fancy with regular expressions or replacing the contents...

It looks like you are trying to do something like this (comments inline):

filename = 'test.txt'               # `file` is a Python built-in
with open(filename, 'r') as data:   # Open the file and close it when we're done
    for line in data:               # This will read one line at a time and exit the loop at EOF
        for word in line.strip().split():  # Strip off the newline and split the line into words
            if word == 'ape':       # If we've found our keyword
                print               #     Then Print a newline
            print word,             # Print every word, without a trailing newline

For Python 3, you'll need to change the syntax ever-so-slightly:

filename = 'test.txt'
with open(filename, 'r') as data:
    for line in data: 
        for word in line.strip().split():
            if word == 'ape':
                print()
            print(word, end=' ')
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice, but could you include a python 3 version? It seems like the OP is using python 3. –  flornquake Aug 20 '13 at 14:48
    
@flornquake: I live to give! –  Johnsyweb Aug 20 '13 at 14:57
import re

file = "test.txt"
for line in open(file, 'r'):
    if(re.search('ape', line )):
        print(line)
share|improve this answer

You can use re.sub to escape the any word found not at the beginning of the line, and put a newline character before it, so you can use the following code.

Note that this looks for whole-words - eg, grape won't be matched with ape (unlike the str.replace solution offered):

import re

word = 'ape'
with open('yourfile') as fin:
    line = next(fin, '')
    print(re.sub(r'[^\b]({0}\s+)'.format(re.escape(word)), r'\n\1', line))
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.