Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Soo, first I have to explain my ...

Situation

  • I have this microcontroller code (plain old C) which includes bool.h with the following content since stdbool.h is apparently not available, especially not with Visual Studio 2008, which is my current IDE for VC++ and C# (see below):

    #ifndef CUSTOM_BOOL
    #define CUSTOM_BOOL
    
    #ifdef __cplusplus
    extern "C" {
    #endif // #ifdef __cplusplus
    
    #ifndef bool
    #define bool unsigned char
    #endif
    
    #ifndef true
    #define true 1
    #endif
    
    #ifndef false
    #define false 0
    #endif
    
    #ifdef __cplusplus
    }
    #endif // #ifdef __cplusplus
    
    #endif // #ifndef CUSTOM_BOOL
    
  • Now I need the functionality of that microcontroller code in a C# Project. That's why I created an intermediate Visual C++ Project containing managed classes that wrap the given microcontroller code.

  • Since this wrapper project (VC++) fiddles about the C code, it also has to #include "bool.h" (in an indirect way however, which means that another header is included, which itself includes bool.h - but I think that's an unimportant detail). Now here's my ...

Problem

Due to the fact that bool.h is included in the VC++ project and this project shall provide functions that return a "real" bool ("real" here means a type that is recognized as a bool by C# when using the VC++ project), unfortunately the bool in the VC++ code is also caught by the preprocessor and thus replaced by unsigned char. What happens now is, that C# complains in the end that a conversion from unsigned char to bool is not allowed. This is all okay and I understand why this happens. So here's my ...

Question

How can I solve this issue in a "clean" way. My current solution is, after including bool.h and right before the VC++ code starts, I undefine bool and friends again like this:

#ifdef bool
#undef bool
#endif

#ifdef true
#undef true
#endif

#ifdef false
#undef false
#endif

It works, but it breaks my proper-way-of-programming-heart. Is there a proper way to fix this? Or is the problem maybe happening before? Should I instead define something like BOOL instead of bool? According to my search on the interwebz, there is no general "standard" way to define bool (or BOOL?) in a C project (C99 is not supported) that everybody would agree upon.

Thanks for any hints.

share|improve this question
1  
That bool.h is poorly written. It checks for __cplusplus, but still uselessly defines bool, false, and true. I'd say that the #undefs are the cleanest solution. (And you don't need the #ifdefs; #undef doesn't do anything if the macro isn't defined.) –  Keith Thompson Aug 20 '13 at 16:03

3 Answers 3

So it sounds like the microcontroller project just made up a new data type and called it bool, which happens to conflict now that bool is a keyword (along with true and false)? My suggestions (in order of preference) would be:

Solution 1: Fix the microcontroller project. Do a global search and replace on bool and replace it with something less contentious. Maybe C_Boolean, C_True, and C_False. Unlikely to cause any future conflicts and fairly simple to do using regular expressions.

Solution 2: Convert microcontroller project to C++. This allows direct use of bool, true, and false (as keywords) and you can just eliminate the macros. This may prove difficult if the microcontroller code uses syntax that isn't c++ compatible.

Solution 3: Do what you've already done. Create a wrapper include which cleans up after including your microcontroller code. I've got code that relies on redefining the extern keyword and this ends up being the only safe way for me. It's fragile though...you'll likely have to fix it in the future when something unrelated breaks the include structure.

Also, I'm not sure what the original author believes the extern "C" wrappers are doing but they have no effect on the macros being defined. Maybe you cut out some stuff that it would have an effect on, but the macros are unaffected by the linker name conventions.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the effort. To 1. That's definitely a solution I also thought about. But then, it's also not so nice, to have a sort of boolean type for each project, although they actually all serve the same purpose. To 2. That's unfortunately not an option. 3. Good idea, although fragile as you said. Thanks for the heads-up regarding the extern "C" stuff. –  GT_mh Aug 20 '13 at 16:18
    
If you've got a number of different microcontroller projects that you are working with I'd be more likely to push for #1. Create a shared header file that everyone uses to define compatibility types. Boolean, specifically sized types, standard big/little endian helpers, etc. Collect them all into a single header and push all microcontrollers to using that header and it's types. The value here is that you get better consistency across projects and it's a one-time conversion for each project. –  Speed8ump Aug 20 '13 at 16:40

You could convert the return value (the char) to a boolean value by using an operator. In this case, for instance, you could simply compare the return value this way:

bool b = 0 != functionthatreturnsaboolean();

Note that I'm not using 1 since the usualt definition of a boolean is 0 for false, anything else otherwise.

The other solution would be to simply use another type of return value. An integer should work well.

Edit: In light of the comment - you could also simply create an interface that calls those functions and returns a C# boolean value.

bool interfacefunction()
{
  return function() != 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but the C# project is going to be an API and I don't want the users of the API having to program around my inadequateness. I definitely want to provide an interface that uses the standard C# bool. –  GT_mh Aug 20 '13 at 15:30

Thanks to Keith Thompson (comment under the question) and Speed8ump's answer, I got another idea:

bool.h:

#ifndef CUSTOM_BOOL
#define CUSTOM_BOOL

#ifndef __cplusplus

#ifndef bool
#define bool unsigned char
#endif

#ifndef true
#define true 1
#endif

#ifndef false
#define false 0
#endif

#endif // #ifndef __cplusplus
#endif // #ifndef CUSTOM_BOOL

Works like a charm and I think it's a cleaner solution than the undefining stuff before. But still, feel free to comment or to provide more / better answers.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.