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I wrote code.

I want to save integer using nsuserdefault.

But this code happen EXC_BAD_ACCESS and SIGABRT.


- (void)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView didSelectRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    ...
    [self desave:[newys integerValue] :[newms integerValue]];
    ...
}

...

- (void)desave:(NSInteger*)year :(NSInteger*)month//←EXC BAD ACCESS happened on this row.
{
    NSUserDefaults *defaults = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults];

    [defaults setInteger:year forKey:@"year"];//←SIGABRT happened on this row.

    [defaults synchronize];
}
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closed as off-topic by Josh Caswell, Gabriele Petronella, Nirk, Michael Härtl, Tala Aug 21 '13 at 6:51

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Josh Caswell, Gabriele Petronella, Nirk, Michael Härtl, Tala
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Post the stacktrace (year will almost certainly be nil, which is the problem). –  trojanfoe Aug 20 '13 at 15:20
9  
So you chose to ignore the "incompatible pointer to integer conversion" compiler warnings? –  Martin R Aug 20 '13 at 15:24
    
I think there is some confusion between NSNumber and NSInteger; stackoverflow.com/q/5870867/620197 –  Mike D Aug 20 '13 at 15:29
    
@martin +1 - symbolically since I accidentally undid my up vote and cannot up vote again as it seems :) –  Mario Aug 20 '13 at 15:33
2  
Not related, but please use standard naming conventions and name your parameters. (void)desaveYear:(NSInteger*)year month:(NSInteger*)month is definitely less awkward to read and use. –  Gabriele Petronella Aug 20 '13 at 15:47

4 Answers 4

Based on your desave method signature, you're passing an NSInteger* as an argument where an NSInteger is expected. NSInteger is not an object derived from NSObject, it's a primitive.

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The problem is caused by the needless pointers being used for the NSInteger parameters.

Change:

- (void)desave:(NSInteger*)year :(NSInteger*)month

to:

- (void)desave:(NSInteger)year :(NSInteger)month

NSInteger is not a class type.

You should also name your method a little better. Right now the name is desave::. It would be better if it was:

- (void)desaveYear:(NSInteger*)year month:(NSInteger*)month

Now the name is desaveYear:month:.

And now you can call it with:

[self desaveYear:[newys integerValue] month:[newms integerValue]];
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You are passing a pointer to an NSInteger. The simplest way to solve this is:

- (void)desave:(NSInteger)year :(NSInteger)month
{
    NSUserDefaults *defaults = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults];
    [defaults setInteger:year forKey:@"year"];
    [defaults synchronize];
}
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On your method

- (void)desave:(NSInteger*)year :(NSInteger*)month

You are sending both year and month variables pointers. This sends the memory addresses instead. Try with this instead

- (void)desave:(NSInteger)year :(NSInteger)month
{
    NSUserDefaults *defaults = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults];
    [defaults setInteger:year forKey:@"year"];
    [defaults synchronize];
}
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