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I've tried to use Perl's given / when construct as expression in subroutine which should return a string containing some warning under some circumstances or an empty string otherwise:

sub warn_about_invalid_date {
    my ( $date ) = @_;
    return do {
        given ($date) { # <------------ works only with given, does not with for
            when (not /^\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}$/) {
                'Invalid date format (should be YYYY-MM-DD)';
            }
            when ('0001-01-01') {
                'Use of default date "0001-01-01"';
            }
            when ($_ lt '1900-01-01') {
                'Probably too far in the past (year < 1900)';
            }
            when ($_ gt '2100-01-01') {
                'Probably too far in the future (year > 2100)';
            }
            default {
                '';
            }
        }
    };
}

(Please ignore some redundant / verbose / non-idiomatic Perl code like return do { } or semicolons at the end of each expression, these are coding practices in my company.)

However, because I try to follow Perl good practices, also these from brian d foy's Effective Perl, here Use for() instead of given(), I've swapped given with for in the snippet above and... it didn't work as I expected. Return value for any input was always '' (empty string / false).

I've narrowed down the problem to this case:

use v5.10.1;
use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

sub test_for {
    for (shift) {
        when (1) { 'True' }
        default  { 'False' }
    }
}

sub test_given {
    given (shift) {
        when (1) { 'True' }
        default  { 'False' }
    }
}

sub test_if {
    if (shift) { 'True' }
    else  { 'False' }
}

sub test_given_if {
    given (shift) {
        if ($_) { 'True' }
        else  { 'False' }
    }
}

sub test_for_if {
    for (shift) {
        if ($_) { 'True' }
        else  { 'False' }
    }
}

$Data::Dumper::Indent = 0;
$Data::Dumper::Terse = 1;
say "test_for( $_ ): ", Dumper test_for($_) for 0..1;
say "test_given( $_ ): ", Dumper test_given($_) for 0..1;
say "test_if( $_ ): ", Dumper test_if($_) for 0..1;
say "test_for_if( $_ ): ", Dumper test_for_if($_) for 0..1;
say "test_given_if( $_ ): ", Dumper test_given_if($_) for 0..1;

which outputs

perl-5.10.1
==========
Useless use of a constant in void context at /home/grozn/test3a.pl line 9.
Useless use of a constant in void context at /home/grozn/test3a.pl line 16.
Useless use of a constant in void context at /home/grozn/test3a.pl line 35.
Useless use of a constant in void context at /home/grozn/test3a.pl line 36.
Useless use of a constant in void context at /home/grozn/test3a.pl line 42.
test_for( 0 ): ''
test_for( 1 ): ''
test_given( 0 ): 
test_given( 1 ): 
test_if( 0 ): 'False'
test_if( 1 ): 'True'
test_for_if( 0 ): ''
test_for_if( 1 ): ''
test_given_if( 0 ): 
test_given_if( 1 ): 
test_for_constant( 0 ): ''
test_for_constant( 1 ): ''


perl-5.16
==========
Useless use of a constant ("True") in void context at /home/grozn/test3a.pl line 35.
Useless use of a constant ("False") in void context at /home/grozn/test3a.pl line 36.
Useless use of a constant ("Foo") in void context at /home/grozn/test3a.pl line 42.
test_for( 0 ): ''
test_for( 1 ): ''
test_given( 0 ): 'False'
test_given( 1 ): 'True'
test_if( 0 ): 'False'
test_if( 1 ): 'True'
test_for_if( 0 ): ''
test_for_if( 1 ): ''
test_given_if( 0 ): 'False'
test_given_if( 1 ): 'True'
test_for_constant( 0 ): ''
test_for_constant( 1 ): ''


perl-5.18
==========
when is experimental at /home/grozn/test3a.pl line 9.
given is experimental at /home/grozn/test3a.pl line 15.
when is experimental at /home/grozn/test3a.pl line 16.
given is experimental at /home/grozn/test3a.pl line 27.
Useless use of a constant ("True") in void context at /home/grozn/test3a.pl line 35.
Useless use of a constant ("False") in void context at /home/grozn/test3a.pl line 36.
Useless use of a constant ("Foo") in void context at /home/grozn/test3a.pl line 42.
test_for( 0 ): ''
test_for( 1 ): ''
test_given( 0 ): 'False'
test_given( 1 ): 'True'
test_if( 0 ): 'False'
test_if( 1 ): 'True'
test_for_if( 0 ): ''
test_for_if( 1 ): ''
test_given_if( 0 ): 'False'
test_given_if( 1 ): 'True'
test_for_constant( 0 ): ''
test_for_constant( 1 ): ''

(warning points to test_for_if)
when executed from perls 5.10.1, 5.16.3 and 5.18.1.

My question is:

Is that correct behavior of for / when expression? It's not implicitely documented as such (Given / when's "Return value" subsection is in "Experimental Details on given and when" section and mentions given only) but from what I understood for is a proper replacement for given (for should be as good topicalizer as given here, shouldn't it?).

If this is a correct behavior then is there any reason to use for instead of given in Perl 5.18 which fixes how given treats $_? Or should I fill a bug / send a pull request in Perl's documentation?

If it's broken, should I fill a bug in Perl (I mean should I always treat for as given more comprehensive twin brother)?

EDIT:

I've added three cases with an if after choroba's answer and comment in which he clams that for behaves the same way as if and company. And I've got even more confused after that.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Add the missing returns to the test_for subroutine to get the same behaviour. given returns the value of the last expression evaluated, for does not.

share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't for behave just like given? I mean is there any reason not to add to for this behavior? –  Xaerxess Aug 20 '13 at 16:13
    
for behaves the same way as if and company. The return value of given is docummented. If you think it should be otherwise, you can try to file a bugreport. –  choroba Aug 20 '13 at 16:16
    
Please see edited question, for does not behave exactly the same way as if, using if gives me a warning. Maybe that's the way for should behave here? I think that parser / compiler should be able to tell that use of constants is useless in test_for, too. –  Xaerxess Aug 20 '13 at 16:33
    
@Xaerxess: It behaves the same if you supply a constant to for. You supplied when. –  choroba Aug 20 '13 at 16:35
    
I see... But shouldn't the compiler be able to warn about useless use of constant in when statement which is inside for which ignores constants in last expression? I feel like this inconsistency (comparing to given / when, not to if) should be marked somehow. –  Xaerxess Aug 20 '13 at 16:49

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