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Somewhere in my code I am doing something very bad. I'm getting undefined behavior in my extrema variable when it does run but most of the time it doesn't even run. Any help would be really great.

#include <stdio.h>

void get_extrema(int quadrant, int **extrema)
{
  if (quadrant == 1)
  {
    *(extrema)[0] = 0;
    *(extrema)[1] = 90;
  }
  else if (quadrant == 2)
  {
    *(extrema)[0] = -90;
    *(extrema)[1] = 0;
  }
}

void print(int* arr)
{
      printf("%i",arr[0]);
      printf(",");
      printf("%i\n",arr[1]);
}

int main(void)
{
    int *extrema = (int*)malloc(2*sizeof(int));
    get_extrema(1,&extrema);
    print(extrema);
    get_extrema(2,&extrema);
    print(extrema);
}

I also tried editing the extrema array using pointer arithmetic like the following:

**(extrema) = 0;
**(extrema+1) = 90;

But that did not work either. I really have no clue where this is going wrong and I could really use some help.

share|improve this question
    
printf("%s",arr[0]); is suspect. %s is for strings. –  Bathsheba Aug 20 '13 at 15:24
    
@Bathsheba good point. That was a mistake in my copying over. –  phileaton Aug 20 '13 at 15:25
    
@philaeton ;-) that's one less UB point –  Bathsheba Aug 20 '13 at 15:26
    
@Bathsheba:- That is a possible answer!!! I guess you should post this as an answer!! :) –  Rahul Tripathi Aug 20 '13 at 15:27
    
What OS are you using? –  thejh Aug 20 '13 at 15:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The reason you get undefined behavior is that the subscript operator [] takes precedence over the indirection operator *. The value of extrema is indexed as an array of pointers, which is incorrect, because there's only a single pointer there.

Since you are passing a pointer to a pointer, you need to put the asterisk inside parentheses:

if (quadrant == 1)
{
    (*extrema)[0] = 0;
    (*extrema)[1] = 90;
}
else if (quadrant == 2)
{
    (*extrema)[0] = -90;
    (*extrema)[1] = 0;
}

Demo on ideone.

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect answer. Thank you very much, that did it. –  phileaton Aug 20 '13 at 15:30

a[b] is equal to *(a + b), but has higher precedence than the *. (And like a + b is b + a, so is a[b] equal to b[a]; and 5[a] equal to a[5]).

Thus:

*(extrema)[1] = 90;

// is equal to
*(*(extrema + 1)) = 99;

// When what you want to do is 
*((*extrema) + 1) = 99;

// which is of course equal to
(*extrema)[1] = 99;

However, an even better question is: why are you using the double pointer, when it is not needed.

void get_extrema(int quadrant, int *extrema)
{
    if (quadrant == 1)
    {
        extrema[0] = 0;
        extrema[1] = 90;
    }
    else if (quadrant == 2)
    {
        extrema[0] = -90;
        extrema[1] = 0;
    }
}

void print(int *arr)
{
     printf("%i,%i\n", arr[0], arr[1]);
}

int main(void)
{
    int *extrema = (int *)malloc(2 * sizeof (int));

    get_extrema(1, extrema);
    print(extrema);

    get_extrema(2, extrema);
    print(extrema);
}
share|improve this answer

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