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I'd like to ask this question (also here), but this time about C++.

What is the difference in C++ between

try { /*some code here*/}
catch(MyException& ex)
{ throw ex;}

and

try {  /*some code here*/}
catch(MyException& ex)
{ throw;}

Is it just in the stack trace (which in C++ is in any case not a standard as in C# or Java)?

(If it makes any difference, I use MSVS 2008.)

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7  
throw ex; // out of apartment –  FredOverflow Aug 14 '12 at 11:27
    
@sehe my bad, I totally did miss the point. –  Charles Addis Oct 9 '13 at 2:01
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8 Answers

up vote 26 down vote accepted

throw; rethrows the same exception object it caught while throw ex; throws a new exception. It does not make a difference other than the performance reasons of creating a new exception object. If you have a exception hierarchy where there some other exception classes derived from MyException class and while throwing an exception you have done a throw DerivedClassException; it can be caught by the catch(MyException&). Now if you modify this caught exception object and rethrow it using throw; the type of exception object will still be DerivedClassException. If you do throw Ex; the object slicing occurs and the newly thrown exception will be of type MyException.

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2  
that depends what ex is. In the example it will be the same object as it is caught by reference (which is the standard way) –  philsquared Dec 2 '09 at 16:31
1  
@Naveen, object slicing will not occur if you have caught by reference. If you caught by value the slicing would already have occured although at that point throw; would save you because it rethrows the original exception) –  philsquared Dec 2 '09 at 16:35
2  
@Phil: no, read 15.1/3 and 15.1/6. Even if ex is a reference, throw ex; doesn't (necessarily) throw the referand, it initializes a temporary object using the referand. The temporary may or may not be elided. throw;, on the other hand, is specified to re-use the existing temporary. –  Steve Jessop Dec 2 '09 at 16:42
2  
@Phil: Checked More Effective C++ Item 12, object slicing does occur. Rolled back my answer to the original answer. –  Naveen Dec 2 '09 at 16:50
1  
@Managu - throwing/ catching by pointer does work as expected. The difference is that the value of a pointer is the address, but the value of a reference is what it references (even if it's implemented by pointers under the hood) –  philsquared Dec 2 '09 at 16:51
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[C++ FAQ Lite § 17.9] What does throw; (without an exception object after the throw keyword) mean? Where would I use it?

You might see code that looks something like this:

class MyException {
public:
  ...
  void addInfo(const std::string& info);
  ...
};

void f()
{
  try {
    ...
  }
  catch (MyException& e) {
    e.addInfo("f() failed");
    throw;
  }
}

In this example, the statement throw; means "re-throw the current exception." Here, a function caught an exception (by non-const reference), modified the exception (by adding information to it), and then re-threw the exception. This idiom can be used to implement a simple form of stack-trace, by adding appropriate catch clauses in the important functions of your program.

Another re-throwing idiom is the "exception dispatcher":

void handleException()
{
  try {
    throw;
  }
  catch (MyException& e) {
    ...code to handle MyException...
  }
  catch (YourException& e) {
    ...code to handle YourException...
  }
}

void f()
{
  try {
    ...something that might throw...
  }
  catch (...) {
    handleException();
  }
}

This idiom allows a single function (handleException()) to be re-used to handle exceptions in a number of other functions.

[C++ FAQ Lite § 17.11] When I throw this object, how many times will it be copied?

Depends. Might be "zero."

Objects that are thrown must have a publicly accessible copy-constructor. The compiler is allowed to generate code that copies the thrown object any number of times, including zero. However even if the compiler never actually copies the thrown object, it must make sure the exception class's copy constructor exists and is accessible.

(edited for more clarity on what I thought was obvious...)

catch(MyException& ex) { throw ex; } may copy ex, with all the issues that it entails; catch(MyException& ex) { throw; } may not.

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Sure, but given that I can choose, in the code above, to do one or the other, what is the difference? –  Joshua Fox Dec 2 '09 at 16:40
    
Great answer, I'll add the comment that we've seen a speed up in our code by moving a large block of exception catching into it's own function. The speed up was due to making the functions smaller by putting the catch blocks into a function. –  chollida Dec 2 '09 at 16:41
    
I'd never noticed that "exception dispatcher" idiom before. Interesting. –  Greg D Dec 2 '09 at 17:18
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If you have an exception hierarchy, throw ex can slice your exception, while throw won't. For example:

#include <iostream> 
#include <string> 

using namespace std; 

struct base 
{ 
  virtual string who() {return "base";} 
}; 

struct derived : public base 
{ 
  string who() {return "derived";} 
}; 

int main() { 
  try { 
    try { 
      throw derived(); // throws a 'derived'
    }  
    catch (base& ex)  
    { 
      throw ex; // slices 'derived' object to be a 'base' object
    } 
  } 
  catch (base& ex) 
  { 
    cout<<ex.who()<<endl; // prints 'base'
  } 
}

Change throw ex to just throw, and you'll get an output of derived, which is what you probably expected to get.

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1  
+1 for mentioning slicing –  peterchen Dec 2 '09 at 16:35
    
Thanks. That's surprising. I wouldn't think that slicing can occur in handling an object by reference. –  Joshua Fox Dec 2 '09 at 16:44
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You can use the throw; form with catch(...) (that is it is the only way to rethrow if you caught using catch(...) ).

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The two have nothing in particular to do with each other. throw means to throw the currently processed exception, and catch(...) means to catch any exception. –  David Thornley Dec 2 '09 at 16:36
1  
My point was that if you caught using catch(...) you cannot rethrow any other way. In the example where an exception is caught by reference, and not modified, there is no real distinction. –  philsquared Dec 2 '09 at 16:37
    
updated to reflect that –  philsquared Dec 2 '09 at 16:38
    
Yes, but I'm really wondering -- given code as in the sample, where I can choose either one, which should I choose, and why? –  Joshua Fox Dec 2 '09 at 16:41
    
If you just want to rethrow the original exception, use throw; –  philsquared Dec 2 '09 at 16:57
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throw ex will make another copy and is not recommend use throw only to throw the current exception object.

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1  
That's true, but only if you catch by value - which is not the recommended way anyway –  philsquared Dec 2 '09 at 16:22
    
As in the code sample, I am doing catch-by-reference, so that should not be an issue. –  Joshua Fox Dec 2 '09 at 16:23
4  
Hm, a test shows that indeed a copy is made (even if you catch by reference), and slicing happens in the process. Simple throw rethrows the exception without slicing, even if the real exception type is a derived class of MyException. –  UncleBens Dec 2 '09 at 16:34
    
@UncleBens - as I conceded elsewhere, you are right on this. That is surprising –  philsquared Dec 2 '09 at 16:52
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throw can throw a nonstandard exception type that was caught by catch(...) (eg structured exception)

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Wasn't that documented as "unintended side effect in VC6, fixed in VC7"? –  peterchen Dec 2 '09 at 16:34
    
Yes, that is a good point. In this case, though, I know the exception type (MyException). So, is there a difference? –  Joshua Fox Dec 2 '09 at 16:42
    
@peterchen, I hope not. That was darn useful to catch SEH exceptions, clean up, and rethrow them. –  Joshua Dec 2 '09 at 17:42
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There's a big difference. I wrote about it on my blog, at: http://cplusplus.co.il/2009/08/23/nuances-of-exception-rethrow/

You are more than welcome to have a look

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Additionally, since it sometimes causes confusion, a bare throw; outside of an exception-handling context will abort the program.

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Any throw that isn't caught will call unexpected(), which will call terminate() unless otherwise specified (names from memory). What's the difference between a bare throw and a throw something in that case? –  David Thornley Dec 2 '09 at 17:59
    
@David, i think Adam means a "throw;" while a handler is not being active. That is, outside of any dynamic exception-handler scope it will call std::terminate (it does not need to occur inside the braces of an exception handler, but such an handler has to have been entered before and not left in the current execution sequence). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 2 '09 at 18:04
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