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I have an issue to access a package variable from a thread. It is for a big project so I will try to extract the relevant part of the code.

I am using the threads module and Moose for the OO part.

our $thread2;

around 'new' => sub {
  [...]
  threads->create( \&_thread1Func, $shared_self );
  if (!$thread2) {
    $thread2 = threads->create( \&_thread2Func, $shared_self );
    $thread2->detach();
  }
}

sub _thread1Func {
  $thread2->kill('SIGUSR1');
}

sub _thread2Func {
  $SIG{'USR1'} = sub { [...] };
  while (1) {
    sleep 5;
    [...]
  }
}

I am getting the following error:

Thread N terminated abnormally: Can't call method "kill" on an undefined value at XXXX.pm line n.

with n pointing to the line $thread2->kill('SIGUSR1');

I was thinking that declaring $thread2 with our makes it visible from the whole package.

Any idea on what is going on?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As mentioned in perldoc threads:

Since Perl 5.8, thread programming has been available using a model called interpreter threads which provides a new Perl interpreter for each thread, and, by default, results in no data or state information being shared between threads.

our "makes a lexical alias to a package variable of the same name in the current package for use within the current lexical scope."

That doesn't mean it creates a variable that is shared among threads. For that, you need threads::shared. However, note:

This module supports the sharing of the following data types only: scalars and scalar refs, arrays and array refs, and hashes and hash refs.

Your code looks troublesome to me. We might be able to offer more concrete help if you explain why you are doing what you are doing.

The following might do something close to what you want:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use threads;
use threads::shared;

my $thread2_tid :shared;

sub myfunc {
    threads->create(\&_thread1Func);
    if (!$thread2_tid) {
        my $thread2 = threads->create(\&_thread2Func);
        $thread2_tid = $thread2->tid;
    }
}

sub _thread1Func {
    while (1) {
        next unless defined $thread2_tid;
        last if $thread2_tid == -1;
        my $thread2 = threads->object($thread2_tid);
        $thread2->kill('SIGUSR1');
        sleep 1;
    }
}

sub _thread2Func {
    local $SIG{'USR1'} = sub { print "SIGUSR1 received\n" };
    local $| = 1;
    while (1) {
        sleep 1;
        print '.';
        if (5 < time - $^T) {
            $thread2_tid = -1;
            last;
        }
    }
}

myfunc();
$_->join for threads->list;
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I can see now what my question was silly... thanks for the highlights! –  Titi Aug 22 '13 at 8:30

By default, perl variables are copied across threads at the time of thread creation. Each thread essentially runs in its own interpreter (the 'i' in 'ithreads').

$thread2 is in scope (thanks to our) but undefined at the time that _threadFunc1 is created. The new thread thus gets a copy of $thread2, also undefined, and then, as you know, fatally attempts a method call against the undefined object.

You could initialize $thread2 prior to creating the thread that must reference its initialized value, or share it and coordinate access. However, given the small excerpt you've shown us, I agree with Sinan Ünür that a redesign may be best.

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