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I am in the process of learning c++. I have a struct like this:

struct Info {

const Long rate;
A* ptr;

}

I have a constructor which takes all the arguments as its parameters to initialize the struct. However, this struct is part of another class which will be serialized using boost serialization. In order to serialize that class I would need a default constructor for this struct. However, when I try to write a default constructor such as

Info () {
}

I get an error C2758 that the member rate should be initialized in the constructor. How to get a default constructor for such a struct which I can use to serialize my class.

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1  
You miss a ; after your struct declaration. You should also put your constructor (declaration) inside your struct. Can you provide a better example of what is not working? –  Laurent Aug 20 '13 at 16:44
    
Is Long a user defined type? –  juanchopanza Aug 20 '13 at 16:48
    
Can you show your Long class too? –  Laurent Aug 20 '13 at 16:56
    
const members are generally not a good idea. They tend to bring in more problems than they solve (remind me, what problems do they solve anyway?) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 20 '13 at 17:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to initialize the constant value, so:

Info () : rate(0) {
}
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The error is probably due to the fact that your Long class does not have a default constructor either.

There are two ways of fixing this:

  • Add a default constructor to Long, or
  • Add rate to the initialization list of Info's constructor.
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The compiler would give error C2512 in that case. Long might just be a typedef of a built in type –  Kindread Aug 20 '13 at 17:29

You can see the msdn documentation for C2758 for a description of the error.

In basic term's, a const variable must be initialised in all constructors. The compiler enforces that any built in type or pointer member that is const must be initialised when the object is constructed, as you won't get a chance to give it a meaningful value after construction ( if you could change it after it was created, how is it const ? ).

Also, as a general rule of thumb, it is always a good idea to initialise members that don't have a default constructor ( built in types, pointers, and objects without default constructors ) to something, in all your class constructors. Otherwise they will either be initialised to some random value ( primitives or pointers ), or you will get a compile error ( objects without default constructors ).

Info()
 : rate(0)
 , ptr(nullptr)
{
}

If you are assigning values to some of your parameters from constructor arguments, don't forget to assign a value to the other members as well.

Info( Long rate)
 : rate( rate )
 , ptr(nullptr)
{
}
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try this :

   struct Info {
      const Long rate;
      A* ptr;
      Info():rate(0){} // as Matthew guessed, call the correct Long constructor
                       // or define a default constructor for Long

   };
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@Dukeling if Long were a default constructible user defined type, it would work. –  juanchopanza Aug 20 '13 at 16:49
    
Yes I've just realized that "long" was "Long –  Laurent Aug 20 '13 at 16:49
    
@juanchopanza Probably, but wouldn't it work without Info(){} as well then? –  Dukeling Aug 20 '13 at 16:50
    
@Dukeling Yes, that is right. Except that OP seems to have some kind of constructor which is not declared in the class, so it is hard to figure out what the real problem is. –  juanchopanza Aug 20 '13 at 16:52

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