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The following code doesn't compile:

void swap(void **p, void **q) {
  void *tmp;
  tmp = *p;
  *p = *q;
  *q = tmp;
}

int main(void) {
  char *s[] = {"help" , "please"};
  swap(&s[0], &s[1]);
  return 0;
}

While this code compiles and runs just fine:

void swap(void **p, void **q) {
  void *tmp;
  tmp = *p;
  *p = *q;
  *q = tmp;
}

int main(void) {
  char *s[] = {"help" , "please"};
  swap((void **) &s[0], (void **) &s[1]);
  return 0;
}

Why is the casting necessary ?

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4  
A char ** is not the same as a void**. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 20 '13 at 17:02
4  
Because a pointer to void* is not universal with a pointer to any other pointer type (like a pointer to char*). A void** is a pointer to a specific type: void*. –  WhozCraig Aug 20 '13 at 17:04
1  
c-faq.com/ptrs/genericpp.html –  FatalError Aug 20 '13 at 17:05
    
@WhozCraig your one line explanation is very nice. and I realized my answer is incomplete (actually incorrect answer). –  Grijesh Chauhan Aug 20 '13 at 17:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yeah, so in addition to the already existing answers that point out that void ** is not the same as char **: your code invokes undefined behavior because of the incompatible pointer types. Here's what you actually want:

void swap(void *p1, void *p2, size_t size)
{
    unsigned char buf[size];
    memcpy(buf, p1, size);
    memcpy(p1, p2, size);
    memcpy(p2, buf, size);
}

And call it like this:

const char *s[] = { "help", "please" }; // also note the use of `const' for string literals
swap(&s[0], &s[1], sizeof(s[0]));
share|improve this answer
    
I deleted my answer (I feel not properly answer the issue). I also feel you should explain WhozCraig's point for OP . –  Grijesh Chauhan Aug 20 '13 at 17:20
    
+1 for seeing not only the problem with the code, but seeing problem the OP was trying to solve. I wish I could up-vote it a second time for pointing out the undefined behavior. –  WhozCraig Aug 20 '13 at 17:23
1  
@WhozCraig and Grijesh: Thank you both! –  user529758 Aug 20 '13 at 17:29
2  
@GrijeshChauhan your answer wasn't wrong, and in fact it may be the "answer" that H2C03 refers to as "existing answers" in his opening comment. Your third and fourth paragraphs are essentially what my comment was about: pointer type incompatibility. Undelete it and I'll up-vote it. It should be here as well. H2C03's answer drives home the UB nature of what the OP was trying, but your answer should be in the list. –  WhozCraig Aug 20 '13 at 17:32
    
@GrijeshChauhan Yeah, ^^ that. –  user529758 Aug 20 '13 at 17:34

You have incompatible pointer assignment error in first code. In C type of a string literal is char[N] Where N is number of chars. Note in most of expressions char[N] easily decays into char*

According to your declaration char *s[] = {"help" , "please"}; type of s[i] is char* (actaully char[N] decayed into char*).

When you pass &s[i] then you are passing char** that is incompatible with void**. Second code works because you typecast into void** in function calling.

void* can be assigned any address type but its void** that has to be assigned address of void* type variable.

If you only having array of strings then in first version of swap function you can replace void by char then you can all without typecast.

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The casting makes the example compile because of what you are passing the function.

char *var[]; is in many ways the same as char **var;

With that being said, you are passing the function a reference/address one of the members of the array (s[0]).

Another more prominent issue, is that the function accepts void pointers, and is passed character pointers (without the casting).

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The function as the OP declared it doesn't accept void pointers; it accepts pointers to void pointers. They are not the same (though one can, in fact, pass a pointer to a void pointer to a function that takes a void pointer as a parameter). –  WhozCraig Aug 20 '13 at 17:22
    
right, I was also trying not to get confused in the area of pointer to pointers vs pointer arrays vs pointer to pointer arrays etc... The list goes on... –  Shade Aug 20 '13 at 17:27

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